Skip to main content

Full text of "The Minerals of North Carolina"

See other formats


Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



The Branner Geological Library 




UEiAND "SmNPOSW dVMOK'WRTERSlLinf 



The Branner Geological Library 




lELASD-SlMWOWDi 'JVNIOM-VNTOEKSilTT 



DEPARTMENT 01' T'HB^-lH'I^BftlOK- . 



BULLETIN 



UNITED STATES 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



No. 74 




WASHINGTON 

GOTBBHMENT PBINTIKO OFFICE 

1S91 



• • •»• •• •• 

• ••••• • ■ I 

• «•• •••• 



• • •• 

_ • 



* • 



ft • » 






8045 



UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SUEVEIT 

J. W. POWBLI.. DIKBCTOK 



THE 



MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA 



FREDERICK AUGUSTUS GBNTH 




WASHINGTON 

aOVEBHMBNT PEIMTIHQ OPKIOB 

1891 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Letter of transmittal 9 

Preface 11 

Native elements ••.. 13 

Gold 13 

Silver 14 

Platinum • 14 

Palladium 14 

Copper 14 

Iron, including meteorite? « 14 

Lead 20 

Antimony •. 20 

Solphnr 21 

Diamond 21 

Graphite 22 

Snlpbides, etc 22 

Sulphides and tellnrides of metals of the sulphur and arsenic groups 22 

Stibnite 22 

Bismuthinite 22 

Tetradymite 22 

Molybdenite 23 

Sulphides, etc., of the iron, gold, and tin groups 23 

Argentite 23 

Galenite - 23 

Altaite 23 

Bomite 23 

Sphalerite or zinc blende 24 

Chalcocite ^ 24 

Troilite 24 

Pyrrhotite 24 

Schreibersite ; 24 

Pyrite 24 

Chalcopyrite 25 

Bamhardtite 25 

Maroasite 26 

Leueopyrite 26 

Aisenopyrite 26 

Nagyagite 26 

Covellite 27 

Salpharsenides, sulphantimonides, etc 27 

Proustite 27 

Aikinite 27 

Tetiahedrite 27 



6 CONTENTS. 

Fftgeu 

Compoands of chlorine, etc 28 

Halite 28 

Cerargyrite 1 28 

Ferrous chloride 28 

Flaorine componnds 28 

Fluorite 28 

Yttrocerite 28 

Oxygen comj^nnds 28 

Oxides 28 

Cnpritd 28 

Melaconite 29 

Curandam 29 

Hematite 31 

Menaccanite 31 

Spinel 32 

Gahnite 33 

Magnetite 33 

Chromite 34 

Cassiterite 35 

Uraninite 35 

Entile 36 

Auatase 37 

Brookite 37 

Pyrolusite 37 

Brannite 38 

Hansmannite 38 

Diaspore , 33 

Gothite 38 

Limonite 38 

Gnmmite 38 

Psilomelane 39 

Wad 39 

Senarmontite or valentinite 40 

Bismite 40 

Molybdite •. , 40 

Qnartz 40 

Opal 42 

Ternary oxygen compounds — silicates 42 

Anhydrous silicates 42 

Enstatite 42 

Pyroxene 43 

Spodumene 43 

Amphibole 44 

Smaragdite 45 

Arfvedsonite 45 

Crocidolite 46 

Beryl 46 

Chrysolite 47 

Garnet 48 

Zircon 49 

Yesuvianite 49 

Epidote 50 

AUanite 50 

Zoisite , 51 

Phlogopite 52 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 
Oxygen compoands—ContiDned. 

Ternary oxygen componnds— silicates— Continaed. 

Anhydrous silicates— Continued. 

Biotite 52 

Muscovite 52 

Labradorile 54 

Andesite 55 

Oligoclase 55 

Albite 56 

Ortboclase 66 

Tourmaline 57 

Fibrolite 58 

Cyanite 58 

Topaz 59 

Euclase 59 

Titanite 60 

Staurolite 60 

Hydrous silicates 60 

ChrysocoUa 60 

Calamine 61 

Talc 61 

Pyrophyllite 62 

Stilpnomelane 62 

Glauconite ; 62 

Serpentine 62 

Deweylite v 63 

Cerolite 63 

Genthite , 63 

Kaolinite 63 

Saponite 64 

Halloysite 64 

Finite 64 

Paragonite 64 

Hisingerite 64 

Culsageeite 65 

Eerrite 65 

Maconite 66 

Lucasite 66 

Penninite. 66 

Prochlorite ard chlorite 67 

Chloritoid 68 

Willcoxite 68 

Margarite , 69 

Dudleyite 69 

Uranotil 70 

Thorite 70 

Auerlite 70 

Xanthitane 71 

Tantalates, columbates 71 

Pyrochlore or microlite 71 

Hatchettolite 72 

Tantalite...... 72 

Columbite 72 

Yttrotantalite .' 73 

Sanmrekite .o ,.•••*•••— T<i 



8 CONTENTS. 

Oxygen compounds— Con tinned. Page. 

Tantalates, colnmbates — Continned. 

Butherfordite 74 

Fergosonite 74 

Polycrase 75 

Kogersite 75 

Phosphates, arsenates, etc 76 

Xenotime .' 76 

Apatite 76 

Pyromorphite 77 

Monazite 77 

Vivianite 78 

OUvenite 78 

Psendomalachite «. 78 

Lazalite 78 

' Soorodite 79 

Wavellite 79 

Pharmacosiderite 79 

Dafrenite 79 

Phosphnranylite A 79 

Autunite 79 

Niter : 79 

Tnngstates, molybdates, etc 80 

Wolframite 80 

Bhombic tnngstate of lime * 80 

Scheelite 80 

Cnproscheelite 80 

Stolzite 80 

Sulphates, chromates, etc 81 

Barite 81 

Anglesite ., 81 

Crocoite 81 

Melanterite 81 

Goslarite 81 

Chalcanthite 81 

Alanogen 82 

Misy 82 

Montanite 82 

Carbonates 82 

Calcite 82 

Dolomite 83 

Magnesite 83 

Siderite 83 

Bhodochrosite 84 

Cernssite 84 

Malachite 84 

Azarite 84 

Bismntite 84 

Mineral coal 85 

Anthracite 85 

Bituminous coal 85 

Lignite 85 

Organic compounds 85 

Amber 85 

Synopsis of minerals and mineral localities by counties 86 

Index. 117 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Department of the Interior, 

XJ. S. Geological, Survey, 

Division of Chemistry, 
Washington, J>. 0., July 31, 1890. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith the manuscript of a re- 
port by Prof. F. A. Genth, of Philadelphia, upon the minerals of North 
Carolina. I request that it may be published as a bulletin of the 
U. S. Geological Survey. 
Very respectfully, 

F. W. Clarke, 

Chief Chemist 
Hon. Ji W. Powell, 

Director. 

9 



PREFACE. 



The present bulletin is essentially a new edition, revised, corrected, 
and much enlarged, of a report published by the Geological Survey of 
l^orth Carolina in 1881'. Since that time there has been great activity 
in developing the mineral resources of the State; and by the reopening 
of old localities and the discovery of new deposits, a goodly number of 
species have been added to the old lists. To mineralogists North Caro- 
lina has become classic ground, especially as regards the mines of mica 
and corundum ; the localities for modified quartz ; the gold sands of 
Burke, McDowell, and Eutherford Counties; and the emerald andhid- 
denite discoveries. Minerals formerly supposed to be rare are now 
found abundantly, and through the recent developments of chemical 
industry even such unusual species as samarskite, monazite, and zircon 
have acquired commercial importance. For example, in response to 
an industrial demand, !North Carolina has supplied zircon and mona- 
zite by the ton, and samarskite by the hundredweight; and the output 
can be increased almost indefinitely. The State has also contributed 
to science several new species as yet not found elsewhere, and some of 
these, notably among tbe vermicyulites, are significant for the light 
which they shed upon other associated minerals. 

In the former edition of this report due credit was given to several 
industrious workers whose enthusiasm had done much for the com- 
pleteness of the record. The late Prof. J. T. Humphreys, and Dr. C. L. 
Hunter, Mr. J. A. D. Stephenson, and Mr. G. B. Hanna were there 
especially named. Mr. William Earl Hidden, of Newark, New Jersey, 
was also mentioned, but since then his continued labors have added 
largely to our knowledge of the mineraftgy of the State. Mr. G. F. 
Knnz, also, in a number of separate papers and in his large work upon 
" The Gems and Precious Stones of North America,'' has done excellent 
service to the mineralogy of North Carolina. To Prof. J. A. Holmes, 
of Chapel Hill,1fHflmb much credit is also due, particularly for per- 
fecting the list of localities. 



'In an earlier form it appeared in 1871 as Appendix C of W. C. Kerr's report. A new edition waa 
printed in 1875 as ohap. I of vol. II of the Geology of Noi tL Carolina. 



12 PREFACE. 

In the present memoir tbere will be fonnd many new analyses, the 
greater namber having been made by the author or under his direct 
supervision. Several very important analyses, however, were furnished 
by the chemists of the United States Oeological Survey. To the field 
geologist or the collector of minerals the table of localities at the end 
of the report will be of especial value. 






• ■ 



• • -• • • • • 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA.' 



By Fredeeiok A. Genth. 



NATIVE ELEMENTS. 

GOLD. 

Gold occurs in numerons localities throughoat the State, generally 
in quartz veins of gneissic, granitic, and dioritic rocks, also in those of 
talcose, chloritic, and argillaceous slates, and in beds of the slates 
themselves, and in gravel deposits, the d6bris of the decomposed rocks 
and veins. The principal counties in which it has been found in suffi- 
cient quantity for exploitation are Franklin, Kash, Granville, Ala- 
mance, Chatham, Moore, Guilford, Davidson, Randolph, Montgomery, 
Stauly, Union, Cabarrus, Bowan, Mecklenburgh, Lincoln, Gaston, Ca- 
tawba, Caldwell, Burke, McDowell, Kutherford, Polk, Cleveland, 
Cherokee, Jackson, Transylvania, and Watauga. 

It is generally more or less alloyed with silver, varying from pure 
gold on the one side to pure silver on the other. Near the surface it is 
usually associated with limonite and at a greater depth of the deposits 
with pyrite, chalcopyrite, galenite, zinc blende, tetradymite, arsenopy- 
rite, rarely with altaite and nagyagite. Specimens of gold, remarkable 
for their size, have been found at the Eeid mine in Cabarrus County, 
the Crump mine and the Swift Island mine in Montgomery County 
(at the latter place in plates, covered with octahedral crystals), at the 
Oansler & Shuford mine in Gaston County, the Little John mine 
in Caldwell County, and Pax Hill in Burke County. Very beautiful 
arborescent gold has been obtained from the Shemwell vein in Euther- 
ford County. The variety '* electrum," containing from 36 to 40 per 
cent of silver, has been met with in octahedral crystals at Ward's mine, 
in Davidson County ; also, in Union County, at the Pewter mine, and 
associated with galenite and zinc blende at the Stewart and Lemmond 
mines, and in the neighborhood of Gold Hill, Bowan County. 

According to the late Dr. Asbury, very interesting specimens have 
been found at Silver Hill, when the mine was first opened, consisting 
of lumps of several inches in length, one end of which was pure gold. 
while the other was pure silver, If one of them have been preserved, 



14 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 



SILVER, w 






Silver is, on the whole, ^rfl^e'' ih *K6'rtli Carolina. It has been ob- 
tained in considerable (ftid^ntfties at Silver Hill, in its native state, 
foliated and tn pfales^m cerassite, also awssociated with argentite, gale- 
nite^a'U^ ^k^ blende in small lumps, and arborescent and filiform masses; 
it li9>s^lsb been fonnd in small plates and reticulated masses, associated 
with tetrahedrite and zinc blende, at the McMakin mine, in Cabarrus 
County ; two specimens of laminated silver have been observed by Dr. 
Asbury at the Asbury mine, in Gaston County; it has also been found 
by Hon. 0, J. Cowles, of the Charlotte Assay Office, associated with 
chalcocite, at Gap Creek mine, Ashe County, and rarely with the gold 
ores of Scott's Hill, Burke County. 



PLATINUM. 



The occurrence of grains of platinum among the sands of the gold- 
washings of Eutherford and Burke Counties was first brought to notice 
by General Clingman, who sent half a dozen grains from a mine near 
Jeanestown to Prof. C. U. Sbepard. It has also been found on Brown 
Mountain, in Burke, northwest of Morganton, on Gen. E. F, Hoke's land. 
It is reported as having been found near Burnsville, Yancey Countyi. 
Hidden, after much searching, failed to discover platinum at any of tho 
reported localities. 



PALLADIUM. 



General Clingman sent a specimen to Prof. C. U. Shepard, which 
came probably from Burke or Eutherford County, which the latter pro- 
nounced *' native palladium." Very doubtful. 

COPPER. 

Copper is found in small quantities in several mines, principally 
near the surface, in minute distorted crystals with limonite at the 
McCuUoch mine, in Guilford County; arborescent and in crystalline 
plates at the Union Copper mine, in Cabarrus County, near Gold Hill. 
One lump of copper, about two inches in size, much resembling that 
from the Cliff mine. Lake Superior, said to have been found in Stokes 
County, is in the museum at Ealeigh. It also occurs in quartz and epi- 
dote rock at Harris Mountain, one half mile east of Gillis mine, Person 
County, at Wolf Creek mine, Jackson County, and Ore Knob, Ashe 
County. A very interesting association is that of native copper 
in quartz crystals from lower Mecklenburg County, as observed by Mr. 
E. Bisseli. 

IRON. 

Terrestrial native iron has been found by Mr. W. F. Page associated 
with monazite, zircon, etc., in the auriferous gravel of Burke County. 
It was in the form of small malleable grains of almost pure iron, with 
jnere traces of cobalt. Apart from this, a great number of highly in- 



GKNTH.) NATIVE ELEMENTS — IRON. 15 

terestiug meteoric masses have been found in the State. Many of them 
have been preserved throagh the industrious perseverance of Gen. 
Olingman, and were described by Prof. Shepard. The meteorites found 
were both irons and stones. They are : 

1. The Caswell County iron, which fell on January 30, 1810; it 
weighed 3 pounds, and was described by Madison. 

2. The Guilford County iron was found in 1820 ; weighed 28 pounds, 
and was described by C. U. Shepard in 1841. Analysis gave: 

Iron 92-750 

Nickel 3145 

Iron sulphide 0*750 

3. The Bandolph County iron was found in 1822, and weighed about 
2 pounds. It was described by C. U. Shepard. It is highly crystalline, 
distinctly foliated,, and presents thin, much interlaced laminae. When 
polished and etched it shows very fine almost invisible feathery lines, 
much resembling hoar frost on a window pane. It is, according to 
Shepard, pure iron with cobalt only in traces. It has a hardness like 
the best tempered steel, and a sp. gr. 7*618. 

4. The Black Mountain iron, from the head of the Swannanoa Eiver, 15 
miles east of Asheville. It weighed 21 ounces and is evidently a frag- 
ment from a larger mass. It is highly crystalline, laminated, the lamiuda 
being about one-tenth of an inch in thickness and arranged parallel to 
octahedral planes. Sulphide of iron being inclosed between the laminae 
renders it subject to rapid weathering. The analysis by C. U. Shepard 
gave: 

Iron ,. 9604 

Nickel, with trace of cobalt 2'52 

Insoluble sulphur and loss 1*44 

Sp. gr., 7*261. 

It was discovered in 1835. 

5. The Asheville iron, discovered in 1839 on Col. Baird's plantation, 
near the French Broad River, 6 miles north of Asheville. It weighed 
about 30 pounds. Analysis by C. IT. Shepard : 

Iron .' 96-5 

Nickel 2-6 

Silicon 0*5 

Chlorine ^ 0-2 

99-& 
With traces of chromium, sulphur, cobalt, and arsenic. * 

6. The Buncombe County iron, found in 1845 and described by C. U. 
Shepard in 1846, weighed about 27 pounds. 

7. The Hominy Creek iron, near the base of Pisgah Mountain, 10 
miles west of Asheville. It weighed between 5 and 6 pounds. It is 
vesicular near the surface, and is said to contain chrysolite, and becomes 
more compact towards the central portion. The polished and etched por. 
tionaof the compact meteorite show most delicate W\dm^\x\^s^:^«^\^^ 



16 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. Ibull.74. 

figures, consisting of very minate and thickly interspersed triangles. 
Sp. gr. 7*32. Tlie analysis by Clark gave : 

Iron 93-225 

Nickel (cobalt) 0-236 

Iron, nickel, phosphoras, and graphite 4 -765 

Copper and tin 0*099 

Sulphur 0-543 

Silicon 0'501 

Magnesium, manganese traces. 

99-369 

8. The Madison County iron, from Jewel Hill. Several masses have 
been found. One of 8 pounds 13 ounces, described by J. L. Smith, was 
presented to him by Hon. T. L. Clingman, in 1854. It was covered 
with thick rust, and it deliquesces on account of the presence of fer- 
rous chloride. The etched surface shows the most beautiful fine Wid- 
mannstadtian figures. 

The analysis by Smith gave : 

Iron 91-12 

Nickel 7-82 

Cobalt 0-43 

Phosphorus 0*08 

Copper trace. 

99-45 

Another mass, which weighed about 40 pounds, was found in 1857; 
part of it is in the collection of Amherst College. 

Still a third mass, found in 1873, is known to collectors aslihe Duel 
Hill iron. It weighed 25 pounds, q^nd shows Widmannstadtian figures 
with octahedral structure, inclosing bright nickel iron. Deliquesces on 
account of inclosed ferrous chloride. Sp. gr. 7*46. The analysis by B. 
S. Burton gav^ : 

Iron 94-24 

Nickel 5-17 

Cobalt 0-37 

Copper trace. 

Insoluble^ 0-15 

99.93 

9. The Haywood County iron, described by^Shepard, weighed only 
one-eighth of an ounce. It is highly crystalline. When polished and 
etched shows brilliant Widmannstadtian figures. It is also irregularly 
veined by a filack mineral, which appears to be magnetite. Sp. gr. 7*419. 
Contains iron, nickel, chromium, and phosphorus. 

10. The Rockingham County iron, from Smith's Mountain, 2 miles 
north of Madison; found in 1866 in an old field grown up with pines, 
but cultivated 10 or 15 years previously. It fell probably in the interval. 
The original weight was 11 pounds, the greater portion of which is pre- 
served in the museum at Raleigh. It is highly crystalline and on etching 

^Silica, iron, Dickel, chromium, and phosphorus. 



QKNTH.] 



NA.TIVE ELEMENTS — IRON. 



17 



gives fine WidmannstSdtian figures, showiDg that it consists of probably 
three different kinds of iron. Contains also schreibersite in short, very 
minute quadratic crystals ; the so-called rbabdite ; and, according to J. 
L. Smith, solid chloride of iron. Sp. gr. 7*78. It has been analyzed by 
me (I) and J. L. Smith (II) as follows : 



I. 



II. 



Iron ... 
Nickel. 
Cobalt . 
Copper 



Insoluble phosphide 



firon 

Xickol (cobalt) 
.Pho8i)horU8 



90-41 i 90-88 
8-08 



8-74 

0-11 
0-27 
0-33 
0-14 



io-50 
003 



003 



100 00 



99-46 



II. A second mass of iron from near Old Mansion House, on Deep 
Spring Farm, Eockingham County, now in the State museum at lialeigh, 
has recently been analyzed by F. P. Venable. Eesults as follows : 

Iron 87-01 

Nickel 1169 

Cobalt 0-79 

Chlorine , ^ 0*39 

Phosphorus 0*04 

Silica 0-53 



100-45 



12. A small meteoric iron, weighing only 428 grammes, was found on 
Linnville Mountain, in Burke County, about 1882, It came into the 
possession of Mr. I^orman Spang, of Etna, Pennsylvania, from whom 
it was obtained by Mr. G. F. Kunz, who described it. Its dimensions 
are 65 mm. long, 35 mm. high, and 38 mm. wide. It is rough on one 
side, with very shallow pittings on the other 5 it shows traces of a black 
crust, and although the mass has not rusted, small drops of ferrous 
chloride have collected in crevices. It contains some troilite, but does 
not show the Widmannstadtian figures. A partial analysis was 
made by W. D. Weikel (I) in 1886, in the laboratory of the University 
of Pennsylvania; and later a more complete analysis was reported by 
J. E. Whitfield (II) : 



Iron 

Nickel 

Cobalt 

Copper 

Snlphar 

Carbon 

Phosphorus. 
Silicon 



J 



I. 

85-83 


II. 


84-56 


13-44 


14-95 


•73 


•33 




( none 




•12 


uudet. 


<J trace 




trace 




[ none 


100-00 


99-96 



Bull. 74 2 



18 • THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

The iron is now with the Kunz collection in the imperial cabinet at 
Vienna. 

13. Another iron from Barke County was found by a plowman aboat 
2 miles from Bridgewater Station, near the McDowell County line. 
It was broken by some laborers into two pieces, weighing lOt^ and 18^ 
pounds respectively. Traces of crust are still visible upon its surface, 
which is very much oxidized. The iron is highly octah.edral in struc- 
ture, and between the plates schreibersite is visible. On the etched 
surface Widmannstadtian figures are shown similar to those on the 
Cabin Creek and Glorieta meteorites. Sp. gr. of a tragment 6-617. 
Analysis by F. P. Venable : 

Iron 88-90 

Nickel 9-94 

Cobalt 0-76 

Phosphorus 0'35 

Chlorine 0-02 

99-97 

For the foregoing particulars I am indebted to Mr. G. F. Kunz, the 
present owner of the meteorite. 

14. In the latter part of 1880 a meteoric iron weighing 72 troy ounces 
was found on a farm near Ellenboro, in Eutherford County. Some- 
what over one-half of the mass was given to Mr. S. W. Cramer, of the 
United States assay office at Charlotte, who recognized its character, 
and by him a liberal portion was given to the U. S. National Mu- 
seum. The iron is highly crystalline, and shows Widmannstadtian 
figures upon its polished surface even before etching. It contains 
small patches of troilite. From its description by Mr. L. G. Eakins 
the following analysis is taken : 

Iron, 8805 

Nickel 10-37 

Cobalt * 0-68 

Copper 0*04 

Phosphorus 0*21 

Sulphur 0*08 

Silicon 0-02 

99-45 

15. An iron from Davidson County, identified by Mr. W. E. Hidden, 
is described by him as follows : 

On the 19th of July, 1879, while Mr. Gray W. Harris was prospecting for gold on 
his plantation near Lick Creek, Davidson County, he found in a ditch a nugget of 
what appeared to him to be silver. It was covered with a thick, scaly crust of iron 
oxide; weighed 2f pounds; was pear-shaped; measured 4| by 2| inches over its 
broadest surface, and about I inch in thickness. Wherever cut or hammered it 
showed a white metallic mass underlaying the red crust. 



.> 



OBNTH.] NATIVE ELEMENTS — ^IRON. 19 

This iron has been analyzed by Dr. J. Lawrence Smith and J. B. Maokintodi. I 
here give the average of four closely agreeing analyses : 

Iron 93*00 

Nickel 5-74 

Cobalt 0-52 

Phosphorus 0*36 

99-62 
Traces of snlphnr, chlorine, and copper ; carbon not determined. 
This iron does not show the customary Widmannstadtian figures. 

Apart from the meteoric irons, the following meteoric stones have 
fallen in l^orth Carolina, and may properly be noted at this point: 

16. The Cabarrus County stone fell on October 31, 1849. It weighed 
18^ pounds and was an irregularly shaped mass, resembling a truncated 
four-sided pyramid; on the base a rounded, undulatory surface, coated 
with a black, coherent crust; tough; color, dark bluish gray, mottled 
with grains and crystals of lighter color; in structure, subporphyritic. 
Sp. gr. 3-60-3-66. 

According to C. TJ. Shepard it contains : 

Nickeliferous iron ( with chrome) 6*320 

Sulphide of ii-on 3-807 

Silica 56-168 

Ferrous oxide 18*108 

Magnesia 10*406 

Alumina 1*797 

Lime, soda, potash, and loss 3*394 

100*000 

17. The Kash County stones fell May 14, 1874, near Castalia. Per- 
haps a dozen or more stones fell, of which 3 have been found, 1 of over 
12 pounds, the others of 2^ and 1 ^^o pounds. They have a dull black 
coating and consist of darker and lighter portions. Sp. gr, 2«601. The 
analysis by J. L. Smith shows that it is composed of — 

Nickeliferous iron 15*21 

Stony mineral 84*79 

The nickeliferous iron contains :. 

Iron 92.12 

Nickel 6*20 

Cobalt 0*41 

Copper and phosphorus not determined. 

98*73 



20 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BULL. 74. 



The stony portion is partly solable in acids, leaving 47-2 per cent 
undissolved: 





Insoluble 
part. 

52-61 

4-80 

13-21 

27-31 

1-38 


Soluble 
part. 


Silica 


38-01 

0-46 

17.51 

41-27 


Alamina , 


Ferrous oxide .,.. 


Magnesia 


Soda with traces of ooi-ash 


Sulphur 


101 






99-31 


98-26 



The insolable portion is mostly bronzite; the solublq, chrysolite, with 
small particles of anorthite. 

18. The Haywood County stone was seen to fall by Mr. W. A. Har- 
rison of Ferguson, about 6 p. m., July 18, 1889, and was picked up 
hot. It weighed about 8 ounces, and very closely resembled the stones 
from M6cs, Transylvania. In shape it was slightly oblong, and was 
covered with a deep black crust, which, broken at one end, showed a 
perfect chondritic structure, with occasional specks of iron. It was sent 
to "New York to Mr. G. F, Kunz, who furnishes its description ; but in 
December, 1889, it was unfortunately lost. 

19. A peculiar substance, consisting principally of iron and silicon, 
supposed to be of meteoric origin, has been found near Butherfordton. 
Shepard described it and called it '* ferrosilicine." 

In a recent "List and Description of the Meteorites of North Oaro- 
lina,'' by Prof. F. P. Venable, published in the " Journal of the Elisha 
Mitchell Scientific Society," three other occurrences are noted, of which 
little is known. An iron weighing 66 grammes found in Alexander 
County in about 1875, is now owned by 8. C. H. Bailey, of Oscawana, 
New 7ork. Another fragment of iron marked as being from Caldwell 
County is in the State Museum at Ealeigh. Also a fragment of a mete- 
oric stone has been reported from Ashe County, but it may be identical 
with the Grayson County, Virginia, fall. 



LEAD. 



A few small irregular lumps of what has been alleged to be " native 
lead'' were received from Messrs. Bechtler, of Morganton. They were 
said to have been dug up 4 miles north of Morganton, in making a road 
near the Catawba Biver. 



ANTIMONY. 



A small piece of native antimony was received from Dr. Hunter. It 
is quite pure and free from arsenic, but coated with a crust of antimonic 
oxide. From a small vein in Burke County. 



OKHTH.J NATIVE ELEMENTS — SULPHUR, DIAMOND. 21 

SULPHUR. 

It is frequently met with iu minate crystals in cellular quartz, filling 
the cavities, formerly occupied by pyrite, in Cabarrus, Mecklenburg, 
Gaston, Caldwell, Surry, and Stokes Counties ; it also occurs diffused 
through the interstices of a white quartzose sandrock in Lincoln County. 

DIAMOND. 

This rare gem has been repeatedly found in North Carolina, and the 
following occurrences are well established. In every instance it was 
found associated with gold and zircons, sometimes with monazite and 
other rare uunerals,»in gravel beds resulting from gneissic rocks, but 
it has never been observed in the !North Carolina itacolumite or any 
debris resulting from its disintegration. The first diamond was found 
in 1843 by Dr. M. F. Stephenson, of Gainesville, Georgia, at the ford 
of Brindletown Creek. It was an octahedron, valued at about $100. 
Another from the same neighborhood came into possession of Prof. G. 
W. Featherstonhaugh, while acting as United States geologist. 

The third diamond, at Twitty's Mine, Eutherford County, was ob- 
served in 1846 by Gen. Clingman, in D. J. Twitty's collection, and has 
been described by Prof. Shepard. Its form is a distorted hexoctahedron 
and its color yellowish. 

The fourth came from near Cottage Home, in Lincoln County, where 
it was discovered in the spring of 1852, and was recognized by Dr. C. 
L. Hunter. It is greenish and in form similar to the last, but more 
elongated. 

A very beautiful diamond was found in the summer of 1852 in Todd's 
Branch, Mecklenburg County. It was nearly of the first water and 
a perfect crystal. It Avas in possession of the late Dr.Andrews, of 
Charlotte. Dr. Andrews informed me that a very fine diamond of 
about the size of a small chinquapin, and of a black color, had been 
found at the same locality by three persons while washing for gold. In 
their ignorance, believing that it could not be broken, they smashed 
it to pieces. Dr. Andrews tested the hardness of a fragment, which 
scratched corundum with facility, proving it to be a diamond. 

A vfery beautiful octahedral diamond of first water was found many 
years ago at the Portis Mine, Franklin County. There is a report that 
a second one has been found at the same locality. 

A small diamond was found a few years ago in McDowell County, on 
the head waters of Muddy Creek. 

Dr. C. Leventhorpe, of Patterson, North Carolina, reports that a 
small, poor diamond was found in a placer mine in Rutherford County 
a number of years ago 5 it was given to Prof. C. U. Shepard, who put 
it in his collection. 

G. F. Kunz states that a diamond weighing 4J carats, or 873 mg., 
was found on the Alfred Bright farm, in Dysortville, McDowell County, 
in the summer of 1886. It is quite perfect, but not \)\ir^ ^lv\t^^\\^.^\\i%^ 
fittnt gTBjiab green tint In form it ia a diatotteil \i^xQeX>^^^^w^ ^^'v^ 



22 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BULL. 74. 



partial twinning. Its specific gravity is 3*549, and it measures 10mm. 
in IcDgth and 7mm. in width. 

According to W. B. Hidden another diamond was fouod in 1877 by 
a small boy in the same region as the one abdve mentioned. It weighed 
2f carats, was shaped very much like a smooth, flat field-bean, and 
was very well polished naturally. It was white, but somewhat flawed. 
The crystal planes were very obscure. It was finally sent to New York 
and cut into a small gem. 

GRAPHITE. 

Graphite has been found at numerous localities. It forms large beds 
in the gneissic and micaceous schists. Sometimes very minute scales 
are disseminated through the gneissic and micaceous, and occasionally 
the limestone rocks. In most places it is impure and gritty, at others 
purer and better varieties have been obtain ed. The largest beds occur 
m Wake County, others in Lincoln, Cleveland, Catawba, Alexander, 
Stokes, Surry, Wilkes, Person, Alleghany, Johnston, and Yancey 
Counties. 

SULPHIDES, ETC. 

SULPHIDES AND TELLURIDES OP METALS OF THE SULPHUR AND 

ARSENIC GROUPS. 

STIBNITE. 

Found in the northern part of Granville County, on the land of Maj. 
N. A. Gregory. 

BISMUTHINITE. 

In very minute crystals and specks in chloritic slate associated with 
gold, chalcopyrite,and pyrite at the Earnhardt vein of Gold Hill, Eowan 
County. 

TETRAD YMITE. 

This rare mineral has been found associated with gold in quartz at 
David Beck's mine, 5 miles west of Silver Hill, and at the Allen mine, 
in Davidson County 5 also, in minute scales in Cabarrus County, at the 
Phoenix mine, Boger mine, Cullen's mine, at the Asbury vein in Gaston 
County, at Capt. Mills's mine in Burke County, and Capt. Kirksey's, 
McDowell County. 

I have analyzed the tetradyn^ite from Davidson County and that 
from the Phoenix mine, Cabarrus County 5 after deducting quartz and 
gold found : 





Davidson 
County. 


Phcenix 
mine. 


Tellurium 


33*84 
6-27 
trace 
61-35 


36-28 
5-01 


Sulphur 


Selenium 


Bismuth 


57-70 
0-31 
0-54 


Copper 


Iron 




/ 




100 46 


99-94 



GKMTH.I SULPHIDES — ARGENTITE, ETC. 23 

MOLYBDENITE. 

In granite and quartz Teins, in fine scales in the neighborhood of the 
Pioneer Mills mine, Cabarrus County ; also, in Guilford County, and at 
Peach Bottom miue^ Alleghany County; at Haskett's, Macon County ; 
and in many other places west of the Blue Eidge. 

SULPHIDES, ETC., OF METALS OF THE IRON, GOLD, AND TIN aEOUPS. 

AR6ENTITE. 

In small grains, associated with native silver, in the ores of Silver 
Hill, Davidson County, and the McMakin mine, in Cabarrus County; 
also in slates of Montgomery County. (Emmons.) Found, also at the 
Cheek mine, Moore County, at Higdon's mine, in the Cowee Mountains, 
and in Swain County. 

GALENITB. 

At Silver Hill sometimes, in highly argentiferous, crystalline, bluish 
gray masses, also coarsely and finely granular. In coarse-grained 
masses at the Hoover mine and Boss mine, in Eandolph County, and 
the McMakin mine, Cabarrus County ; in small quantities at Miller's 
mine. Baker mine, and Little John mine, in Caldwell County; at Pax 
Hill, in Burke County ; in Alexander County ; at Cansler & Shuford 
mine, the Asbury mine, the &ng's Mountain mine, the Crowder's Mount- 
ain barite mine, and the Oliver mine, in Gaston County ; highly aurif- 
erous and argentiferous galeuite occurs at the Stewart mine, Lemmond 
mine, Phifer mine. Smart mine, Moore mine, and Crowell miue, and 
elsewhere in Cabarrus; and at Long mine in Union County; at the 
Cheek mine, Moore County; with copper ores it is found at the Clegg's 
and Williams's mines, in Chatham County; the Peach Bottom mine, 
in Alleghany County; at Marshall, in Madison County; with gold at 
Murphy, Cherokee County, and in Lincoln, Macon, Swain, and Surry. 
Specimens of fine-grained galenite have also been obtained from Beech 
Mountain^ in Watauga; on Elk Creek, Wilkes County; and at the 
Steele mine, Montgomery County. 

ALTAITK. 

This exceedingly rare mineral occurs associated with gold, nagya- 
gite, galenite, etc., at King's Mountain mine, Gaston County. 

BORNITE OR VARIEGATED COPPER ORE. 

I have crystalline specimens of boruite from Guilford County, prob- 
ably from the Gardner Hill mine ; it is of somewhat rare occurrence in 
North Carolina, but has been found with other copper ores at Clegg's 
mine, in Chatham County; Marshall, in Madison County; Peach Bot- 
tom, Alleghany County; the Gap Creek mine, Ashe County; near 
Concord, Cabarrus County, and at Well's farm in Gaston. 



24 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. | bull. 74. 

SPHALERITE OR ZINC BLENDE. 

This mineral occurs in quantities sufficient for exploitation only at a 
few mines. The principal localities are Silver Hill and Silver Valley, 
in Davidson County, and the McMakin mine, in Cabarrus County, 
where it is found associated with silver ores; associated with gold ores 
at Stewart, Lemmonn, Long, and Moore mines, and rarely at the Union 
mine, in Union County ; in limestone at Dobson's mine. Cedar Cove, 
McDowell County, and in Macon County; in small quantities with 
other ores at King's Mountain mine in Gaston County ; at Claytco), in 
Johnston County, near Marshall; in Madison County, and on Uwharie 
River, Davidson County; at the Steele mine, Montgomery County; at 
Peach Bottom mine, Alleghany County ; Crowder's Mountain, Gaston 
County ; and the Smart mine. Union County. 

CHALCOCITE. 

This is also a copper ore, but rarely met with in the State. The 
massive variety has been found at the Ore Knob mine, in Ashe County ; 
also associated with bornite at Gap Creek mine, Ashe County; the 
Waryhut and Wolf Creek mines, in Jackson County ; the Gillis mine, 
and Mill Creek mine, in Person County; also at the Pioneer Mills 
mine, in Cabarrus; at A. Nichol's, in Swain; and in Guilford County, 
as a product of the alteration of other copper ores and rarely with silver 
ores at Silver Hill. 

TROILITE. 

Interlaminated with the meteoric iron from the Black Mountain, 
Buncombe County, and in other meteorites, q. v. 

PYRRHOTITE. 

Compact pyrrhotite is found at the bottom of the Asbury shaft in 
Gaston County; also associated with chalcopyrite at the Elk Knob 
mine, Ashe County, on East Fork and West Fork of Pigeon River, 
Haywood County, in Transylvania County, near Hickory in* Catawba 
County, at Thorn Mountain mine, Macon County, and in Surry and 
Wilkes (Trap Hill). 

8CHREIBER6ITE (RHABDITE). 

This mineral, of meteoric origin, has been observed in minute quad- 
ratic prisms of great brilliancy in the meteoric iron of Smith's Moun- 
tain, Rockingham County, and in less distinct particles in many of the 
meteoric irons. 

PYRITE. 

Pyrite is one of the most common minerals of North Carolina. It 
is not only found in globular and irregularly shaped crystalline masses 
in many of the marl beds of the eastern counties, but many of the 
^eissic rocks and slates and the traps contain it in considerable quan- 



GMPPH.! SULPHIDES — CHALCOPYBITE, BARNHARDTITE. 25 

titles, and besides it is foand in almost every mine of the State. In 
Cleveland and Butherford it is a common constituent of the feldspathic, 
slaty gneisses, disseminated in minute grains, and its ready oxidation 
rapidly disintegrates the rocks, so that during the late war copperas 
was extensively and cheaply manufactured here by simply breaking 
and heaping the half decomposed fragments of rock in hoppers, leach 
ing and crystallizing. In the gold mines the associated pyrite is gen- 
erally auriferous. Cubical crystals occur at Hickory, Catawba County ; 
Asbury mine, Oaston County ; Soapstone quarry, ] 2 miles northeast 
of Statesville ; Silver Hill, Gold Hill, and many other localities. Com- 
"binations of cubes and octahedra are found in Clegg's mine, Chatham 
County, and in the Guilford County gold and copper mines; the 
pyritohedron, 'often in combination with cubical and octahedral planes, 
is found at the Stewart mine, in Union County ; : )ambridge mine, 
Guilford County ; Long Creek mine, Gaston County ; Budesill mine, 
Mecklenburg County, etc. Large veins of compact pyrite occur in 
Gaston County. 

CHALCOPYRITB. 

This is very abundant, and, indeed, is the only reliable copper ore 
in Korth Carolina. It has been found in fine crystals at the Gardener 
Hill mine, probably also at other copper mines of Guilford County. It 
is very abundant and largely mined at Ore Knob, Ashe County, and 
promises to be the ore of all the gold mines, which in depth change 
into copper mines in Guilford, Cabarrus, and Mecklenburg Counties ; 
also at the Clegg mine, in Chatham County; the Conrad Hill and the 
Emmons and other mines in Davidson County; Peach Bottom and 
elsewhere, Alleghany County ; and at Gap Creek, Ashe County ; New- 
lin's mine, Alamance County; in Alexander; in the gold mines of Union, 
Bowan, and Gaston Counties; at Macpelah Church, in Lincoln County ; 
in Granville and Chatham Counties ; near Hillsboro ; near Chapel Hill, 
Orange County ; near Baleigh, in Wake County ; in Surry, Wilkes (Trap 
Hill), Yadkin, Watauga, and Swain counties; and some of the mica 
mines of Mitchell County ; the copper mines of Macon and Jackson 
Counties — in more than thirty counties, and hundreds of localities ; at 
many of them it is found associated with other ores. 

BARNHARDTITE. 

A peculiar and rich copper ore, first noticed on Daniel Earnhardt's 
land and then at the Pioneer Mills mine, in Cabarrus County. It also 
occurs at the Cambridge mine, in Guilford County; at the Wilson mine 
and the McGinn mine, in Mecklenburg County ; and at Elk Knob, Wa- 
tauga County. The true barnhardtite occurs in compact masses — hav- 
ing, on a fresh fracture, a very pale bronze yellow color, but rapidly 
t^arnishing with brownish pinchbeck, also with rose red and purplish 
tiolors. That from Barnhardt's land has been analyzed by W. J. Tay- 
lor (I), that from Pioneer Mills by me (II) aud by P% K^^«.^\: ^\tL\. 



26 



THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. 



[bull. 74. 



Copper.. 

Iron 

Salphnr 
SUver.. 



1 

I. 

47-61 
22-23 
29-40 
traco 


II. 

46.60 
22-41 

29-76 


III. 

4840 
21*08 
30-50 




99-24 


98-80 1 99-98 



There occurs at the Pioneer Mills, associated with the barnhardtite, 
another copper ore, which appears to be uniform in composition and 
does not look like a mixture.- It is paler than copper pyrites and eon- 
tains, according to the analyses of W. J. Taylor (I) and Oharles Proe- 
bel (II) : 





I. 


II. 


Copper 


40-2 
28-4 
32-9 


405 
28-3 
311 


Iron 


Sulphur 


• 


101-5 


99-9 



MARCASITB. 



According to the information received from Dr. Asbury, of Charlotte^ 
this mineral occurs in Iredell County. 



LEUCOPYRITE. 

It has been observed by the late Dr. Asbury, at the Asbury mine, in 
Gaston County; in nodular masses almost completely altered into scoro- 
dite at Dr. Halyburton's, in Iredell County; and at Drum's farm, on 
White Plains, Alexapder County. 

ARSENOPYRITE OR MISPICKEL. 

It occurs sparingly in North Carolina, and has been observed in minute 
crystals, associated with gold ores, at theLemmond and Stewart mines, 
Union County, and at the Barringer mine and George Lud wick's mine 
in Cabarrus County. It has been found by Gen. Clingman in Cleve- 
land County, and by Dr. Asbury, at Ore Knob mine in Ashe County, 
the Honeycutt vein at Gold Hill, and highly auriferous at the Asbury 
mine, in Gaston County. It also occurs near Cooke's Gap, Watauga 
County, in fine crystalline particles, disseminated through siliceous 
rock; and, according to Hidden, at Brindletown (?). 

NAGYAGITE. 

This exceedingly rare mineral, which previous to its discovery in 
North Carolina was known only from Transly vania, in Hungary, occurs 
sparingly in minute crystals and foliated particles at the King's Moun- 
tain mine, where it is associated with altaite, gold, etc. 



OMTB.1 S0IjYTa.kB,8ETSIDES, 8ULPHANTIM0»IDjBS, ETC. 



B7 



COVELLITK. 

Besalting from the decomposition of chalGox)yrite and associated 
with it, covellite occurs at several of the North Carolina copper mines, 
for instance at the Phoenix mine, etc., in Guilford County ; and in fine 
scales at the Gillis mine and Mill Creek mine, in Person County. 

STJLPHABSENIDES, SULPHANTIMONIDES, ETC. 

PROUSTITK (?). 

Microscopic crystals of a bright aurora red color occur with talc, 
rhodochrosite, etc., at the Mc\Iakin mine. As they are rich in silver 
they are probably proustite. 

AIKINITB OR CUPREOUS COSAUTB (?). 

A mineral containing sulphur, bismuth, lead, and copper, and there- 
fore probably aikinite or cosalite, has been observed in small particles 
in quartz associated with chalcopyrite at Col. White's mine, Cabarrus 
County. 

TETRAHEDRITE. 

Two varieties of tetrahedrite are found in North Carolina, the highly 
argentiferous (freibergite), in small compact patches of subconchoidal 
fracture and a dark gray color, associated with silver, sphalerite, gale- 
nite, talc, magnesite, etc., at the McMakin mine, Cabarrus County, 
and the other in the same county at George Lud wick's mine, 14 miles 
northeast of Concord, rarely crystallized, but mostly massive and of a 
dark lead- gray to iron color. It is associated with chalcopyrite, scoro- 
dite, arseniosiderite, etc., in a quartz vein. 

The tetrahedrite from the McMakin mine has been analyzed by my- 
self (I) and by Mr. J. S. de Benneville (II) in ray laboratory. The sec- 
ond sample was very pure, and was collected about twenty years ago, 
and twenty years after the first. 





I. 


II. 


Sd. ct - ,. 


4-776 


Salphnr 




25-48 
17-76 
1165 
30-73 
1-42 
2-53 
10-53 


26-55 
6-99 
13-49 
37-46 
2-05 
567 
647 
0-45 


Antimony 


Arsenic 


Copper. , 


Iron ••••.... -. 


Zinc 


Silver \ .' 


Manganese 






100 00 


9912 



28 THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

There is probably an occasional small admixture of argentiferous 
tetrahedrite with the minerals associated with the native silver of Silver 
Hill, as they sometimes give before the blowpipe incrustations of anti- 
mony. 

COMPOUNDS OF CHLORINE, ETC. 

HALITE OR COMMON SALT. 

Found in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, from which it can be 
obtained by evaporation, and in wells and springs at several points in 
the Triassic beds, e. g., in Chatham, Orange, and Rockingham Counties. 

CEBARGTRITE. 

In some of the gold ores of Scott's Hill, in Burke County, silver is 
found after roasting; a specimen, which I had an opportunity to ex- 
amine, makes it probable that it is present as chloride of silver or 
cerargyrite. 

FERROUS CHLORIDE. 

It has been observed in the meteoric irons from Asheville and from 
Jewel Hill, Madison County, which are wet from the deliquescence of 
this salt. In the Eockingham County iron it has been found in the 
solid state. 

FLUORINE COMPOUNDS. 

FLUORITE. 

According to Gen. Clingman, fluorite occurs at Brown Mountain, 
Burke County; also in Watauga; with barite and hematite below Mar- 
shall, Madison County, and at King's Mountain, Gaston County. In 
pseudomorphs after apatite rarely at Ray's mine, Yancey County. 

YTTROCERITB (?). 

A few minute, deep violet-blue spots were observed in association 
with pyrochlore, black tourmaline, orthoclase, quartz, etc., at Hay's 
mica mine. Hurricane Mountain, Yancey County, which are probably 
yttrocerite. 

OXYGEN COMPOUNDS. 
OXIDES. 
CUPRITE. 

Cuprite or the red oxide of copper occurs near the-surface in some of 
the copper mines. It is rarely found in small cubical crystals at CuUen's 
mine and in octahedra upon native copper at the Union Company copper 
mine in Cabarrus County. It has been observed at Clegg's mine, Chat- 



OKNTH.J OXIDES — MELACONITE, CORUNDUM. 20 

ham County; at Silver Hill, at the Harris mine, iu Person County; jn 
Caldwell, Lincoln, Alleghany, and Ashe Counties, and upon the gossan 
of the Wary hut mine, Jackson County. At the McGinn mine, in Meck- 
lenburg County, and several of the Guilford County copper mines, cuprite 
in acicular and capillary crystals ^so-called chalcotrichite) was formerly 
found in beautiful specimens. 

MELACONrrE. 

It is found occasionally as a black coating or a powder associated with 
cuprite at the McGinn mine, and with zincblende, etc., sparingly at Silver 
Hill; also at CuUowhee mine, Jackson County. 

CORUNDUM. 

One of the most interesting minerals, which occurs in the Slate of 
North Carolina in a great many varieties, is corundum. In was first 
noticed when, in the spring of 1847, a large mass of a dark blue cleav- 
able variety was found 3 miles below Marshall, in Madison County. 
Gen. Clingman's attention having l3een called to it, he searched for 
more, and obtained in 1848 a second piece of about half the size. It 
has since been found 2J miles north of Marshall, at Haynie's, associated 
with margarite and rutile. It was afterward found by Dr. C. L. Hunter, 
in small quantity, in reddish and bluish masses, sometimes crystallized, 
at Crowder's Mountain, and afterward at Clubb's Mountain and King's 
Mountain, Gaston County. About 20 years ago large beds of corundum 
were discovered by Hiram Crisp, near Franklin, in Macon County, at 
Culsagee or Corundum Hill. Here it is from 10 to 14 feet thick, em- 
bedded in prochlorite, between chrysolite and hornblendic gneiss. The 
corundum itself presents many varieties. Beautiful hexagonal pyramids 
with basal and rhombohedral planes and of many shades of color, from 
almost colorless to yellow and deep red, rarely to green, have been found. 
Some of the crystals are very large, one, for instance, measured 5 feet 
2 inches in length. Usually it occurs massive, often in large cleavage 
masses, frequently of variable colors; some are red and semitransparent 
and in small fragments even transparent and form a fair ruby; other 
specimens of reddish or gray corundum have disseminated through the 
mass the most beautifully colored azure-blue sapphire. Unfortunately 
the particles of the red and blue are usually too small to have any value 
as gems. A very peculiar variety is that consisting of white and blue 
bands. At this locality corundum is associated with prochlorite, black 
and greenish black spinel, tourmaline, small quantities of rutile, etc., 
and where it occurs in the mica schist, with muscovite and margarite. 

Other localities in Macon County where corundum is mined are 
Jacob's and Haskett's mines, on Ellijay Creek, and at Kobinson's mine, 
on Sugartown Fork. It is also found at Houston's mine, and at Moore 
& Higdon's. At West's mine *^ruby" corundum occurs in small, irreg- 
ular crystals and crystalline masses associated with cyanite. 



30 THK MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA, [bull. 74. 

At the Hogback mine, in Jackson Gonnty, corundum associated with 
muscovite, margarite, and tourmaline is embedded in chlorite. At the 
hanging wall feldspar with crystals of corundum is met with. A small 
quantity, not exceeding a few ounces, of corundum has been found near 
the chrysolite outcrop at Webster, Jackson County, and also on Scott's 
Creek. At Cullakenee mine, in Clay County, a grayish white and blae 
corundum is found associated with margarite, zoisite, ^ctinolite, etc., 
and a red variety, sometimes of a deep ruby color, associated with zoi- 
site, smaragdite, cyanite, and a feldspar. 

At Penland's, on Shooting Creek, in Clay County, corundum is found 
associated with margarite and willcoxite. It also occurs in Cherokee 
County, on Valley Eiver. 

In Haywood County, 2 miles northeast of the Pigeon Eiver, where 
the Asheville road crosses it near a serpentine outcrop, a small quantity 
of corundum has been found, also on the west fork of Pigeon. About 2 
miles north of this is located the Presley mine, which has furnished the 
most beautiful specimens of blue and grayish blue corundum largely 
altered into muscovite and albite. 

About 20 miles northeast of this mine, in Madison County, is the 
Carter mine, which yields a white and pink variety of corundum, both 
in crystals and laminated masses. It is associated with greenish black 
spinel and prochlorite. Very rarely crystals of asteriated sapphire, 
implanted on a micaceous rock, are found at this locality. 

Corundum is found also in Mitchell County, near Bakersville, in 
chrysolite- 

In the broad-bladed cyanite of Wilkes County, corundum is met with 
in small reddish brown particles, aud in the cyanite of the Swannanoa 
Gap, in Buncombe County, blue, bluish, white, and reddish corundum. 
Also at N. P. Watkins's, in the same county. 

It is found in the gravel 2 miles west of Statesville, in Iredell 
County, associated with cyanite, but rarely imbedded in it. Highly 
iuterestiug crystals and crystalline masses of grayish white corundum 
more or less altered into muscovite and tourmaline have lately been 
found by Mr. J. A.D. Stephenson, at Belt's Bridge, and beautiful hexa- 
gonal prisms of a pale brownish corundum, with a partial alteration 
into soda margarite, at Hendrick's farm near Belt's Bridge, Iredell 
County. 

Above Lock's Bridge, on the south side of the South Yadkin Eiver, 
red corundum occurs largely tiltered into greenish fibrous and compact 
muscovite; at the Chipley Farm and Austin's Farm, 3J miles above 
Lock's Bridge, gray corundum partly altered into margarite ; at Liberty 
Hill, 3 miles above Austin's Farm, it is altered into margarite and pro- 
chlorite; and at Hunting Creek, north of Statesville, blue corundum is 
partly altered into the rhaetizite — variety of cyanite. 

Crystals of corundum surrounded by fibrolite occur at Shoui)'8 
Ford in Burke County, and Iliddon. reports corundnni of three colors, 



GBMTH] OXIDES HEMATITE, MENACCANITE. 31 

including the "ruby ^ variety, from Brindletown. It is also reported 
from Stokes County. In the neighborhood of Morganton corundum is 
found in muscovite schist, and in the gravel deposits of Burke, Mc- 
Dowell, and Eutherford Counties small grains and crystals, often partly 
altered into muscovite, are frequently met with. The granular variety 
of corundum, " emery," has been observed at Crowder's Mountain and 
also in the titaniferous iron ore belt near Friendship, Guilford County. 
At Brackettstown, McDowell County, massive grayish white corun- 
dum has been found, and in Mitchell County, at Plum Tree Creek, well 
developed crystals of a brownish color. Barely small remnants of 
corundum are found in the pyrophyllite slates of Chatham County. 
The associated minerals of corundum are mostly the result of the al- 
teration of corundum, which latter has furnished the alumina neces- 
sary for their formation. 

HEMATITE. 

Bed oxide of iron or hematite is one of the most important iron ores 
of l^orth Carolina. The compact ore, sometimes more or less mixed 
with the specular variety, forms large beds in Chatham County, at ' 
!Evaus's and Kelley^s ore beds, Ore Hill, Buckhorn, etc.; also in Moore 
County, 12 miles east of Carthage, in Orange County, at Chapel Hill, 
6 miles south of Hillsboro; and at J. Woods's, Knap of Beeds; and 
in Macon, Swain, Buncombe, and many other counties. Foliated and 
micaceous hematite occurs at Buckhorn, Ore Hill, 7 miles west of Lock- 
ville, in Chatham County ; Snow Creek, Stokes County ; 4 miles south 
of Salem, in Forsyth County; at Mount Tirzab, in Person County; 
near Gudger's, 9 miles below Marshall, on the French Broad River, 
and near Franklinville, Randolph County, and elsewhere. A very 
fine variety of slaty hematite with crystals of magnetite is found at 
Cooke's Gap, Watauga County ; and both here and at Richlands, in 
Caldwell County, and near Fisher's Peak, in Surry County, martite 
occurs. Other localities are: Smith's River, 2 miles east of Morehead's 
factory, in Rockingham County; a granular variety 1 mile east of Gas- 
ton, at House's mill, Cabarrus County; at Hickory, Catawba County; 
in Lincoln, Gaston, and Mecklenburg Counties, etc. The ocherous 
variety has been observed in Buncombe County, 4 or 6 miles west of 
Asheville, at Valley Town, on Peachtree Creek, Cherokee County, and 
in a great many gold mines. Hexagonal scales of hematite in crystals 
of quartz occur at King's mill, Iredell CountVi 

MENACCANITE. 

Many of the titaniferous iron ores are mixtures of true magnetite and 
menaccanite, otherb belong to this species, and others again are really 
magnetites, in which a portion of the iron is replaced by titanium. 
Our present knowledge of these ores is too limited to put all the varie- 
ties occurring in the State with certainty in the place where they belong. 



32 



THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BUXX, 74. 



Those from the following localities appear to belong under this head: 
Franklin, in Macon County ; Big Laurel, in Madison County ; on Ivy, 
Yancey County; Crab Orchard, Cane Creek, Flat Bock, and Grassy 
Creek, in Mitchell County; Damascus, Iredell County; Old Harris 
mine, 12 miles southeast of Charlotte, south end of Crowder's Moun- 
tain, and at Wills's, Gaston County; Yadkin Biver, near Patterson, in 
Caldwell County, and the neighborhood of Baleigh. Menaccanite in 
quartz occurs at Fisher Hill, Guilford County. Iserite is frequent in 
the gold sands of Eutherlord, Burke, and McDowell Counties, etc, 
Menaccanite also occurs at Shoup's Ford, Burke County ; at Huffman's, 
Catawba County; at Culsagee, Macon County; at Haynie's, Madison 
County, and in Person, Watauga, and Lincoln Counties. 

Associated with oligoclase, forming cross fissures in the corundum 
vein at the Carter's mine occur two varieties of menaccanite (ilmeuite): 
(1) of a brownish black color with a somewhat purplish hue, in small 
masses with indistinct crystalline structure and basal cleavage ; (2) in 
rounded nodules, 1^ to 2 inches in diameter, irregular shape, very 
fragile, and breaking into small fragments without regular form, and a 
subconchoidal fracture, resembling the slag-like magnetite from Unkel 
on the Rhine. Neither variety is magnetic. Mr. Harry F. Keller has 
analyzed them (1) and (II). I have also analyzed a variety of black, 
somewhat granular menaccanite (ilmenite) from near Franklin, Macon 
County (III): 





I. 


II. 


in. 


Sd. ffr k, ............ 


4-67 


4 08 




kjp. gt . ......... ..................... ...... ... 

Titanic oxide 




52-73 
8-08 

33-08 
5-33 
014 


52-64 

1007 

31-11 

5-83 


48-61 

9-76 

40-22 

1-38 




Ferric oxide 


Ferrous oxide 


Mamiesia 


Silica 







99-36 


9915 


100-00 



Menaccanite is also named by Hidden among the minerals occurring 
at Brindletown. 



SPINEL. 



The only spinel which has been found in IN^orth Carolina is that 
which results from the alteration of corundum, and it is usually a mix- 
ture, in variable proportions, of the varieties pleonaste and hercynite, 
sometimes with an admixture of that called picotite. In the chlorites 
of the Culsagee mine it is found in octahedral crystals with dodecahe- 
dral planes, but usually massive, coarsely to finely granular. Its color 
is black, but by an incipient alteration on the surface it generally 
becomes of a peculiar greenish gray color and satin like luster. Some 
varieties are blackish green, but so dark that the green can be observed 



6KHTH.] 



OXIDES— GAIINITE, MAGNETITE. 



33 



ouly ia thin spliatersj it is rarely found at the Gnllakence mine in 
Clay County^ bat frequently met with at the Carter mine in Madison 
County, where it is mostly of a very dark green color. Several varit ties 
from the Culsagee mine have been analyzed. (I) A fine grained vari- 
ety of 3'766 sp. gr., by G. A. Koenig; (II) a coarser grained variety of 
3*797 sp. gr., by the same; and (III) the coarse-grained crystallized dark 
green, of 3*695 sp. gr., by myself. IV is an analysis of a greenish black 
spinel from the Carter mine, sp. gr. 3*77, made by Mr. J. S. de Beune- 
ville in my laboratory. In I, II, and III some mechanical admixtures 
have been deducted : 





I. 


II. 


in. 

66-63 

trace 

1-80 

11-35 

19-86 

0-11 

0-25 


IV. 
67-54 

13-38 
18-62 


Alumina ..•.•••.«•«••...•••. .to. ..•• 


54-32 
396 
11-51 
11-16 
19-05 


66-68 

2-28 

966 

14-60 

16-88 


Chromic oxide 


Ferric oxide ....................... 


FeiTODB oxide ..................... 


Maffnesia .......................... 


Ciinric oxide ............. .... 


Xickelons oxide 












100-00 


100-00 


100 00 


99-54 



Black octahedral crystals of vitreous luster from the Tibbets mine, in 
Macon County, -are probably pleonaste. 

GAHNITE. 

Gahnite, or automolite, is mentioned by Gen. Clingman as occurring 
in Cleveland County; also in Mitchell County, at the Deake mine, 
where it occurs in small, compact, dark green masses, in part altered 
into and surrounded by fibrous muscovite. 

I have made an examination of it and found: 

Copper oxide 0*30 

Zinc oxide 38*05 

Manganese oxide 0-29 

Magnesia 0*79 

Ferrous oxide 1*14 

Ferric oxide 4*50 

Alamina 54*86 



99*93 



Sp.gr-. 4*576 



MAGNETITE. 



This is the most abundant and most valuable iron ore in North 
Carolina. It occurs in small octahedral crystals in the granite at Dunn's 
Mountain, in Bowan, and in the granites and gneisses and (especially) 
the syenites very commonly in many counties, and in the slates at 
Fisher's Peake and Chestnut Mountain, in Surry County ; also at Bull's 
Head, in Alleghany County, in quartzose saudrock and hematite at 
Cooke's Gap, Watauga County; at Capp'sHill, in MecklenburgCouutYs 
Bull. 74 3 



34 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bulu74 

and Fisher Hill, in Guilford. It occurs in its granular variety, mixed 
with muscovite, manganiferous garnet, etc.^ at Buckhorn, in Chatham 
County, and mixed with menaccanite and occasionally with corundum, 
in a succession of beds, passing through the gneissic rocks of David- 
son, Guilford, Forsyth, and Rockingham Counties. There appear to be 
several isolated outcrops northwest of this band and between it and the 
Dan Biver, and also in Randolph and Montgomery Counties. A band of 
granular magnetite* free from titanic acid, mixed with actinolite, tremo- 
lite, and a little epidote, passes from near Danbury in Stokes County, 
and also from Surry County, through Yadkin, Forsyth, Davie, Lincohi, 
and Gaston Counties. It contains some of the most valuable ore beds. 
It is also found in large beds near Newton, in Catawba County; at 
Comb's farm. Summer's farm, and Thomas Payne's farm, in Iredell 
County; also in Orange, Mecklenburg, and Cabarrus Counties. Some 
very valuable ore beds of crystalline magnetite occur id Swain, Madi- 
son, Macon, Haywood, Burke, Alexander, Wilkes, Orange, Mitchell,, and 
other counties, .the most extensive probably at Cranberry. A granular 
ore, similar to the ores of Surry County, has been worked at the north 
fork of New River, near the mouth of Helton Creek, and on Horse 
Creek, in Ashe County. There are many other localities in which mag- 
netite occurs, but they are of less importance than those enumerated, j 

CHROMITE. 

Occurs in the chrysolite beds, which form lenticular masses in the 
hornblende slates, etc.; in minute octahedral crystals and granular 
masses at Culsagee ; also at Higdou's, Ellijay's Creek, and at Moore's 
mine, in Macon County; near Webster, at Hogback, at Alnslie's, 
and on Scott's Creek, in Jackson County; on Mining Creek, near Hamp- 
ton's, in Yancey County ; at Cullakeuee, in Clay County ; Carter's mine, 
in Madison County ; in small quantities near Bakersville, Mitchell 
County ; on South Toe River, on Rich Mountain, Watauga County ^ 
and in Ashe County. Where it is found in abundance, it may becoin.e 
a valuable ore when it can be brought to market at a low freight. -A. 
small admixture of chromite is found in the titaniferous magnetite belt 
of Guilford, Rockingham, and other counties. Crystals of chromite aire 
frequently met with in the gold sands of Burke, McDowell, Ruthor- 
ford, etc. 

The analysis which I have made of a compact variety of chromite 
from near Franklin, Macon County, gave : 

Chromic oxide 44*15 

Alamina 22*41 

Ferric oxide 5'78 

Ferrous oxide 11*76 

Magnesia 15*67 

09-77 
Sp. gr., 4*319. 



«»Tii.] OXIDES — CA8SITERITE, UEANINITE. 35 

The pare octahedral crystals of chromite washed oat of gravel at 
OalsageCfMacoa Coaoty, have been aaalyzed in my laboratory by Mr. J. 
S. de Beuneville, Sp. gr. 4*79. Deducting 2*70 per cent of silica, the 
mineral contains : 

Chromic oxide 5^*60 

Alamina 5*31 

Ferriooxide 10-98 

Ferrons oxide 19*91 

Magnesia 7'20 

100-00 

GASSITSRITE. 

Foand in 1882, near King's Mountain, Gaston County, by Mr. R. T. 
Olay well. It was first recognized as cassiterite by Hidden, and the 
mineral was afterward more fully investigated by Prof. C. W. Dabney, 
jr. It generally occurs in irregular cryptocrystalline and massive lumps 
of a dark brown color, but also in many shades from colorless to black. 
The largest piece yet found weighed about 14 ounces. Specific gravity, 
6*0 to 6-9. According to Hidden, the ore is sparsely disseminated over 
a very considerable area in and about King's Mountain Village, but no 
paying deposits have yet been discovered. Analyses by Dr. Dabney 
gave for two varieties : 



stannic oxide .' 

Tungstic oxide 

Sulphur 

Arsenic 

Iron and manganese oxides 
SiUca 

Metallic tin 



Light 
grayish. 


Dark 
brown. 


9470 


82-99 


92 


1-14 


trace 


0-46 


trace 


trace 


undet 


nndet 


1-76 


2-36 


97-38 


86-95 


74-41 


65-21 



URANIXITB. 



It was found by Prof. Kerr at the Flat Eock mine, Mitchell County, 
^ 1877, in small nodules of gummite and uranotil, forming tbe nucleus 
of these minerals, both of which are resulting from its decomposition, 
It has since been found at one or two other mines in Mitchell, especially 
*t the Deake mine, in cubes and cnbo-octahedrons, of sp. gr. 8*9G8 to 
^•218; color, iron-black to brownish, according to the extent of the 
alteration. The uraninite from the Flat Eock mine has lately been 



36 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [BULu7i 

analyzed by W. F. Hillebrand in the laboratory of the U. S, Geological 
Survey, as follows: 

Uranic oxide .- •. 50*83 

Uranous oxide 39*31 

Tboria 2-78 

Cerons oxide 0*26 

Lanthana and didymia 0*50 

Erbia and yttria 0*80 

Lead oxide 4*20 

Ferrous oxide trace 

Lime 0*85 

Magnesia and alkalies 0*30 

Water 1*21 

Silica 0*08 

Phosphoric acid t 

Nitrogen 0*37 

Insoluble 0*10 



100*99 

Sp. gr., 9*086. 

The material, which was received from Mr. W, E. Hidden, was 
slightly altered, containing minute crevices tilled with gammite. 

RUTILE. 

.In beautiful crystals at Orowder's and Clubb's Mountains, Gaston 
County; also granular at the same localities ; rarely in small grains or 
crystals with the corundum of the Culsagee mine in Macon County 
and the Hogback mine in Jackson County; in acicular crystals, some- 
times over 1 inch in length, near Beattie's Ford, Mecklenburg County; 
in long crystals in quartz on a hill near Buckhorn Falls, in Chatham 
County, at the head of Cane Creek, Mitchell County; in beautiful 
acicular crystals at Mrs. Daniel's farm near Mount Pisgah, at Mrs. 
Jordan's near King's mill, at Alex. Lackley's, Misses Bennett's, Thomas 
Adams's, and Mrs. Smith's farm, all in Iredell County; acicular crys- 
tals in limonite and quartz on John Lackey's farm near Liberty Church, 
and Wilson's near Poplar Springs; geniculated crystals at White 
Plains, at Crouch's, and at Milholland's mills, all iu Alexander County. 
The first-named locality furnishes the most magnificent crystals, some- 
times 3 or 4 inches in length, fully developed, with numerous brilliant 
planes, often geniculated and transparent, with a beautiful red color. 
According to Hidden, Alexander County must be credited with having 
produced the most beautiful rutile crystals known to science. He says: 

Entile is found there in a similar sitnatioa to the gems and quartz crystals, i. e., 
in open pockets; in fact, it is found intimately associated with and implanted npon 
the gems, and often preponderates over all the other crystal contents. The particu- 
lar points of difference over the same product from other regions are their mode of 
occurrence, beautiful natural polish, and crystailographic features. Their color ranges 
from jet black to clear ruby red and pale yellow. They range from those of minnte 
aiises to rare osawples 3 inches long and one-half inch diameter. Their luster ia some 



A OXIDES — ^ANATASE, BROOKITE, PYEOLUSITE. 37 

easee approaches that of polished steel, (jenis have been cut from the most solid 
crystals and the result compares favorably with the rare black diamonds from Brazil, 
Only experts coald tell them apart. 

Carionsly jointed, mitered, and reticulated crystals and also masses of crystals thus 
nnited have been commonly met with ; all of which are found to follow certain arbi- 
tary twinning laws and are not accidentally brought together into such strange shapes 
as a cursory examination might seem to indicate. 

This description applies in particular to crystals found in or near 
the emerald and hiddenite mine. Butile is also abundant in coarse 
crystals near Bryson City, Swain County ; in acicular crystals in brown- 
ish amethyst, at the head of Honey Creek, Wilkes County ; in dark, 
almost black, crystals iii Clay County ; in quartz in Yancey County ; 
in small grains and crystals in the gold sands of Burke, McDowell, 
Bntherford, and Polk ConntiegL; acicular crystals in quartz at Dietz's, 
Van Horn's, and Hildebrand's, and in large crystals also at the latter 
point, Burke County ; in large crystals at E. Batch's, H. Balch's, Widow 
Balch's, Huffman's, and D. Lutz's, and in amethyst at the last two 
points — all in Catawba County; in amethyst in Cabarrus near Con- 
cord, and in Randolph near Pilot Mountain; penetrating corundum 
near Bakersville, Mitchell County; at Bay's mine, and elsewhere in 
Yancey County ; in reticulated acicular crystals in the northwest cor- 
ner of Lincoln County (Hunter). 

Under the name of edisonite. Hidden describes a supposed fourth 
form of titanic oxide firom the Whistnant gold mine in Polk County, 
It has been shown by Mtlgge to be only a variety of rutile. 

ANATASE. 

Anatase has been found in small, brilliant, tabular crystals, in the 
gold sands of Burke County, by myself and Mr. Hidden. The latter 
also reports it from Alexander County, in quartz, and from McDowell 
and Rutherford Counties. At Brindletown, in Burke County, the crys- 
tals were of unusual size; some were highly modified, and a few were 
transparent and glassy, and of a pale green or blue color. 

BBOOEITB. 

In the gold sands of Rutherford, McDowell, and Burke- Counties, 
brookite occurs in small, short, slender, rhombic prisms. At Brindle- 
town Hidden found it varying in color from dull yellow to brown, a few 
crystals being of a fine red with highly modified terminations. 

PYROLUSTTE. 

It is found near Murphy, Cherokee County ; also 2 miles north of 
Hickory, Catawba County, and with silver ores at the McMakin mine, 
Cabarrus County; also in tine crystalline masses at Beck's ore bank, 3 
miles from Ellison's ore bank, Gaston County; near Danbury, Stokes 
Coanty; near Webster, Jackson County; in Surry Govmt,^^\3kfea?t \^<^V 



38 THE MINERALS OV NORTH CAROLINA. Ibxjll.1L 

son ; and in Alexander, Swain, and Mitchell. No large deposits have 
yet been discovered in North Carolina. 

BRAUNITB (?). 

Found in qnartz near Hillsboro, Orange County. K. 

HA.U8MANNITE (f). 

Recently reported from near Dobsou, Surry County, by H. 0. Lewis; 
and it also occurs in Chatham. K. 

DIASPORE. 

Oen. Clingman observed this rare mineral associated with blue 
corundum from near Marshall, Madison.County. I have not been able 
to distinguish it with certainty from ^.ny other of the corundum locali- 
ties, but it was observed in very minute but beautiful acicular crystals 
of the usual form in a cavity of massive corundum &om Culsagee, by 
John C. Trautwine, of Philadelphia. 

GOETHITE AND LIMONITE. 

I put these two species of hydrated sesquioxide of iron together, as 
without fuller examination it is impossible to distinguish the majority 
of the specimens. Large beds of hydrated sesquioxide of iron are 
found at Ore Hill and elsewhere in Chatham County, and in Johnston, 
5 miles west and northwest of Smithtield; near the High Shoals, in 
Gaston County; in Lincoln and Catawba Counties; near Murphy and 
along Valley Eiver and Notteley, in Cherokee; in Mitchell, Buncombe, 
Watauga, McDowell, Burke, Caldwell, Alexander, Wilkes, Surry, Hay- 
wood, Macon, Henderson, Transylvania, Davidson, Wake, and other 
counties ; and superficial beds of it are also frequently found in the 
eastern counties — Xash, New Hanover, Pender, Jones, Duplin, eta 
Brown hematites accompany in small quantities many of the magnetite 
and hematite beds, and form the upper part of many of the gold and 
copper mines ; they are often the result of the alteration of siderite and | 
pyrite, and show frequently the form of the original mineral: for in- , 
stance, at Conrad Hill, in Davidson County; Cabarrus County, Gail- 
ford County, Gaston County, and at Beam's farm, near Center Pointy • 
Iredell County. 

GUMMITE. 

Discovered by Prof. Kerr in 1877, at Flat Rock, Mitchell Conntgr- . 
Sometimes found in distinct cubical crystals with octahedral planeSy i 
usually in amorphous, compact, nodular masses of a faint resinons I 
luster and of shades between reddish yellow and deep orange red. j 
Fracture uneven to subconchoidal. Sp. gr. 4*840. The mean i>f three 
analyses which I have made gives its composition as follows : 



OBITH.1 OXIDE — ^PSILOMELANE, WAD. 39 

Silica 4-63 

Alumina 0-53 

Baryta 0*98 

Strontia 005 

Lime 2*05 

Plumbic oxide 5*57 

Uranic oxide 75*20 

Phosphoric acid • 0*12 

Water 1054 

99-77 

These analyses show that the so-called gammite is not a distinct min- 
eral species bat a mechanical mixture, the IN'orth Carolina variety 
being — 

Per cent. 

Uranic hydrate 40*10 

Uranotil 33-38 

Lead nranate 22*66 

Barium nranate 4*26 

100-40 

Besults from the alteration of uraninite. Found also at the Deake 
and Lewis mines, Mitchell County. A similar mineral is found in small 
quantity at Buchanan mine, Mitchell County. 

The largest mass of gummite with uraninite found in the State 
weighed 6 pounds 6 ounces. The nodules often contain black urani- 
nite at the center. 

PSILOMELANB. 

It is often an associate of gold and iron ores in coatings of the quartz 
at Scott's Hill, Burke County, together with pyrolusite at Beck's ore 
bank, on the High Shoals, Gaston County, and in botryoidal masses in 
a vein, said to be 4 feet wide, near Lenoir, in Caldwell County, near 
Bakersville, at Gillespie's Gap, in Mitchell County, on Cove Creek, and 
Bichmond Creek, Haywood County, and at Buckhorn in Chatham. In 
Gaston County at the Long Creek mine, on Cross Mountain, Ormond 
ore bank, etij.^ a variety occurs, which contains a small quantity of 
cobalt and nickel. Also fouiid in McDowell and Lincoln Counties. 



WAD. 

There is often an imperceptible change from pyrolusite into psilome- 
lane and wad, so that, without analysis, it is often difficult to know to 
which a specimen may belong. The earthy varieties are generally 
called wad. A brownish black, earthy wad occurs near Murphy, Chero- 
kee Ooanty, also near Franklin, in Macon County, and Webster, in 
Jacksou County, at Gillespie Gap, Mitchell, in Burke, Catawba, Surry 
and Mecklenburg, and at the Ormond ore bank in Gaston County. 



40 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. Ibui,u.74. 

SENARMONTITE OR VALENTINITR. 

. The incrustation upon the native antimony of Burke County, which 
does not show any crystalline planes, belongs to either one or the other 
of these species. 

BISMITE. 

An earthy, greenish yellow and straw yellow mineral has been ob« 
served at the King^s Mountain mine and the Asbury vein in Oaston 
County. It is probably bismite. 

MOLYBDITE. 

Found associated with molybdenite as a yellow, earthy powder, near 
Pioneer MUls, Cabarrus County. 

QUARTZ. 

As a constituent of n^ost of the rocks of North Carolina, and the 
gangue rock of almost every vein, it occurs nearly everywhere throagh- 
out the State. Several of its varieties, however, are of more than usual 
interest. Eock crystal is found in numerous most beautifully modified 
forms on the farms of the Lackey family and others near Mahoffey's 
mill, Alexander County. These have been the subject of a highly im- 
portant crystallographic investigation by Prof. Gerhard vom Bath, of 
Bonn. Unusually large masses of rock crystal from near Jefferson, 
Ashe County, were sent to New York in 1887. One perfect crystal 
weighed 20 J pounds; another crystal weighed 188 pounds, and a third 
weighed 285 pounds. The last named was 29 inches long, 18 wide, and 
13 thick. Some of the masses found would yield perfectly pellucid 
crystal balls of 5 inches in diameter. This occurrence has been de- 
scribed by G. F. Kunz. 

Good doubly terminated crystals occur at Sugar Mountain, Burke 
County. Eock crystals are also found in Rutherford County; near 
Morganton, Burke County ; near Hickory, Caldwell County; Catawba 
County, Iredell County; Mountain mine, in Cleveland County; at Hamp- 
ton's, on Mining Creek, Yancey County; Stokesburg, in Stokes County; 
Macon County, Swain County, Rich Mountain, head of Cove Creek, in 
Watauga County; Mitchell and Transylvania, in Wilkes, Guilford, 
Lincoln, Gaston, Burke, Anson, Granville, Wake, Moore, Warren, and 
other counties. Quartz crystals, inclosing liquid (hydrolite, Hum- 
phreys), in beautiful specimens, are found on Isaac Price's farm. White 
Plains, Alexander County, also found by Prof. Humphreys, in pockets 
and drift veins in Catawba County, and in the South Mountains, Burke 
County, one with a bubble which moves nearly 2 inches, and a group of 
13 crystals having 50 bubbles. He also found crystals with the basal 
l)lane in Burke, Catawba, and Alexander Counties. At the emerald 
locality, in Alexander County, some 7 years ago, Mr. Hidden discovered 
a remarkable *' pocket" which yielded over 400 pounds of crystals, 



GWfTH.1 OXIDES — QUARTZ. 41 

many of them containiug water babbles of nnasaal size. Nearly all of 
these were destroyed by freezing, which shattered the crystals to frag- 
ments. Batilated quartz crystals of great beauty are met with at 
several localities in Randolph, Gatawba, Burke, Iredell, and Alexander 
Counties (enumerated under Butile). Quartz crystals with scaly crystals 
of hematite occur at King's Mill, Iredell County. Quartz between 
laminsB of muscovite, occurs at the Deake mine, on Toe Eiver, Mitchell 
County. Badiated quartz is found at Dillahay's gold mine, in Person 
County and in Wake County. Amethyst, in very fine crystals and 
clusters of crystals, and of a good violet or pink color, but mostly of a 
dark, smoky color, is found at Bandleman's, Lincoln County, also at the 
lead mine, Alexander County, at Hickory, Catawba County, in Buther- 
ford, Chatham, and Wake Counties ; amethyst of a deep purple color 
with rutile occurs in Catawba County, and a smoky amethyst with 
rutile, at the head of Honey Creek, Wilkes County. Bose quartz is 
found at Highlands, in Macon, near Franklin ville, in Bandolph (with 
acicular rutile), White Plains, Alexander County, and near Concord, 
Cabarrus County, likewise penetrated with rutile. Smoky quartz is 
found 3 miles from Taylorsville, Alexander County, on Cavin's and also 
on Pritchard's and Patterson's farms ; it also occurs in large crystals 
on Brush Creek, Mitchell County, In the drift of Brindletowu, Burke 
County, at the mouth of Beaver Dam Creek,.Cherokee County, and in 
Alleghany County. 

Milky quartz is found at Boseman's farm, Alexander County, at the 
forks of the Laurel, Madison County, and at War Hill, Surry County; 
opalescent quartz at Dan Biver, Stokes County. Quartz pseudomorphous 
after calcite, both crystallized and fibrous, is found 2 or 3 miles north- 
west of Butherfordton, Eutherford County; the irregularly shaped frag- 
ments frequently contain water. Similar pseudomorphs occur at Craw- 
ford's farm, 6 miles east of Statesville, in Iredell County ; and a peculiar 
variety of pseudomorphous quartz, after feldspar perhaps, occurs at 
Shooting Creek, Clay County. Concerning the quartz at Crawford's 
farm, Hidden says : 

From a Qurefal study of the rock in situ and of many specimens from the localities, 
I am forced to conclude that these forms of qaartz are pseudomorphs of the inter- 
stices between crystals of some mineral that crystallized in thin, flat, tabular forms. 

Sections of these water-bearing forms present an interior of bright transparent 
crystals, oj of mammillary chalcedony, while the structure of the walls is serai- 
radiated from the exterior. Careful examination of the surfaces shows a series of tri- 
angular markings (angles 60^) on all sides. Now these markings are exactly what we 
would expect by the slow deposition of quartz on the basal pinacoid of a uuiaxal 
crystal (rhombohedral), or of the deposition of quartz from solution in a vein filled 
up with meshed and netted crystals, which being thin, presented only basal planes 
for contact surfaces. What the original mineral was is not shown by the specimens. 
The casts of crystal cavities in the larger masses show an unmistakable hexagoual 
prism with a large development of the basal pinacoid (those two planes identified by 
striations on the quartz), and this characteristic is persistent. 

Chalcedony is found near Frankliu, Macon County; near Webster, 
Jackson County; at Ham])ton's Mining Creek, X^we^^ VjViw\\\.^\ ^ 



42 THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. [buu*74. 

Martin's limestone quarries, in Stokes Goanty; on Alamance Greek, 
Alamance Goanty; and in Lincoln, Iredell, and Ghatham Gountita. 
Hornstone occurs at Martin's quarry, Stokes Goanty; near Asheville, 
Bancombe Gonnty; in Madison Gounty and Iredell Gonnty; and in 
Montgomery, Randolph, and elsewhere. Drusy quartz is frequently 
found on the decomposed outcrops of the chrysolite beds in Macon, Jack- 
son, Glay, Buncombe, and Madison Gounties. Itacolumite or flexible 
sandstone forms a stratum in the quartzite at Linville, Burke Gounty; 
Sauratown Mountains, in Stokes Gounty, and Bending Bock Mountain, 
in Wilkes Gounty. Fossil wood is abundant in th^ Triassic beds in 
Anson Gounty, and near German ton, in Stokes Gounty; near Gheek's 
Greek, in Montgomery Gounty, and in Johnston Gounty; and in the 
quaternary gravels of Halifax, Moore, Gumberland, Wayne, and other 
counties. Agate is found in many places; at D. Galdwell's, Mecklen- 
burg Gounty; near Harrisburg and near Goncord, Gabarrus Gounty; 
in Granville, Orange, and elsewhere. , Jasper occurs biEinded (red and 
black) in Person Gounty, in Granville (Knap of Eeeds Greek), in 
Madison Gounty (near Warm Springs and on Shut In Greek), in Moore 
County, in Wake, and elsewhere. 

A peculiar purplish brown variety of quartz from Uwharie, Mont- 
gomery Gounty, partially analyzed by me, gave : 

Ignition 0*70 

Silica 91-53 

Ferric oxide , 5'16 

Magnesia 0*14 

Lime 0-66 

Undetermined... 1*81 

100-00 
Sp gr., 2-663. 

OPAL. 

The only variety of opal which has come to my notice from North Car- 
olina is '^ hyalite" in bluish white mammilary coatings upon the quartz 
of gold veins in Gabarrus Gounty, and at the Culsagee mine, Macon 
Gounty. It is rarely found in beautiful, colorless, and white botryoidal 
incrustations upon foliated chlorite. A peculiar yellowish to brownish 
hyalite, incrusting quartz, was collected by F. W. Glarke in 1883, at 
Foster's mica mine, near Jefferson, Ashe Gounty. 

TEBNABY OXYaEN COMPOUNDS. 

SILICATES. 

ANHTDR0V8 SILICATES. 

ENSTATITE. 

Forms beds at the corundum mine of Gulsagee, in Macon Gounty, 
in coarsely crystalline masses of a brownish gray, yellowish color 5 in 
coarsely granular masses with chrysolite, at Webster, Jackson Gounty; 



r 



OAWTH.] SILICATES — ^PYROXENE, SPODUMENE. 43 

also in small crystnlline particles, dissemiuated throagh chrysolite, at 
Hampton's, Mining Greek, Yancey County, and 2^ miles south of Bak- 
ersville, in Mitchell County. Bronzite is found at Bald Creek, Tancey 
County, and near Kernersville, Forsyth County. I had this mineral 
from the Culsagee mine analyzed in the laboratory of the University of 
Pennsylvania by Frank Julian, who found: 

Water 1-21 

Silica 57-30 

Alamina trace 

Ferrons oxide 7*45 

Magnesia.... > 34*G4 

100-60 

PYROXENE. 

Black and brownish black, cleavable masses, with magnetite, at 
Cranberry, Mitchell County, and of pale greenish color, with magnetite, 
on Ivy Eiver, Madison County, and on Horse Creek, Ashe County ; in 
" traps '^ at Greensboro, Guilford County ; green coccolite, in calcite, 2 
or 3 miles from the mouth of Bear Creek, in marble, at Walnut Creek, 
1 mile from French Broad Biver, Madison County, and at Gx)shen, Macon, 
County. Dark brownish black and black pyroxene is one of the con- 
stant constituents of the numerous " trap ^ rocks found in North Caro- 
lina. 

SPODUMENE. 

/ 
Occurs in Sharpens Township, in Alexander County. The first crystals 
obtained were pale yellowish green, and were thought to be diopside. 
They had been found loose in the surface soil by some children living 
on a farm near Salem Church, and were shown to Mr. William Earl 
Hidden by Mr. J. A. D. Stephenson, of Statesville. The former gen- 
tleman sent specimens to Dr. J. Lawrence Smith, who, by analysis, 
proved them ^o be spodumene. The mineral has since been extensively 
mined under the direction of Mr. Hidden ] and the new emerald green 
variety of spodumene has received the name of hiddenite. As a gem 
it ranks equal in beauty and value to the emerald, which latter stone 
occurs with the hiddenite. In color it ranges from fine emerald green 
through yellow to nearly white. It occurs almost invariably im- 
planted upon the walls of open pockets, associated with a number of 
other minerals of considerable beauty. The emerald green variety has 
been analyzed by Dr. J. L. Smith (I) and myself (II), as follows : 



44 



THE MINERALS- OF NORTH CAROLINAr 



[BTTLUli, 





I. 

314 


II. 


Sd. firr. .b.... ..................................... ...... 


3166 


Silica 


64-5 
27-0 


63 05 
26-58 
018 
111 
6-82 
1-54 
007 


Alnmina < — 

Chromic oxide ^ 


Ferrous oxide 


1-9 
7-5 


Lithia 


Soda i 


Potash 








100-9 


100-25 



The sp. gv. of the yellowish hiddenite I fouud to be 3-177 ; that of the 
darkest green variety was determined by Smith to be 3-191 to 3.194. 



AMPHIBOLE. 



Amphibole is represented in North Carolina by namerons varieties. 
We find white and gray tremolite associated with talc at Marble Greek 
and Murphy, Cherokee County ; also on the Tennessee Creek, Jackson 
County, in talc and chrysolite ; at Webster, Jackson County j the White- 
side Mountains, Sugartown, 8^ miles from Franklin ; at the Culsagee 
mine, Macon County, 2J miles south of Bakersville, in Mitchell County; 
at Hampton's Mining Creek, Yancey County ; on Toe River ; at the 
Carter mine, Madison County ; gap of Black Mountain, and the south- 
east slope of Three Top Mountain, in Ashe County. Gray and brown- 
ish grammatite occurs near the Tennessee Creek; anthophyllite oc- 
curs at Culsagee mine and at Gregory Hill, in Macon County; actin- 
olite lias been observed in talc near Belt's Bridge, Iredell County ; at 
Shooting Creek, Clay County; Swannanoa River, near Asheville; and 
with chrysolite at Webster, Jackson County ; Hampton's Mining Greek, 
in Yancey County, 2J miles south of Bakersville, Mitchell County ; in 
talcose rocks near Tennessee Creek, on the Bast Fork of Tuckasege IJ 
miles from its mouth, Mecklenburg County; Rich Mountain, Wa- 
tauga County; Franklin, in Macon County; at Bolejack's limestone 
quarry, in Stokes County ; at Rogers's ore bank, near Danbury, in Stokes 
County; near Morganton, Burke County; and Ellison's, in Gaston 
County. Asbestos has been found at Webster, and at the head of Cul- 
lowhee Creek, Jackson County ; on Sugartown Greek, near Franklin ; at 
the Nantehaleh River, in Macon County; the Brushy Mountains; at 
Baker mine and on John's River and on King's Greek, Caldwell County; 
and on Smith's River, Rockingham County, in Franklin and Wilkes 
Counties; at Hampton's Mining Creek, in Yancey County; at Buchan- 
an's and Cane Creek, near Bakersville, in Mitchell County ; also in quartz 
crystals at J. W. Warren's farm. White Plain's, Alexander County. 
Black and greenish black hornblende is abundant throughout the State 
in the hornblende slates, hornblende rocks, syenite, and diorite. It has 
been found in rather large cleavage pieces 23 miles below Franklin, 
on the Swannanoa, Eiver, near Asheville ; at the CvxUowhee and Savan- 



OKNTH.] SILICATES — SMABAGDITE, ARPVEDSONITE. 45 

Dali mines, in Jackson Ooanty ; at Jarrett's, on the I^antehaleh, in Cher- 
okee Goanty; and at Polecat Greek and near Oreensborough, in Gnil- 
ford Gounty. 

Trne orthorhombic anthophyllite, well crystallized and transparent, 
has been described by Penfield from the Jenks comndnm mine at 
Franklin, Macon Gounty. Sp. gr. 3.093. Analysis (Penfield) as fol- 
lows : 

Silica 57-98 

Ferroosoxide 10':59 

Manganese oxide 0*31 

Magnesia \ 28-69 

Lime 0-20 

Alamina 0-63 

Water 11-67 

Loss at 100 012 

99-99 
BMABAGDITE (f); KOKSCHAROWITE. 

A beautiful mineral, which may be a variety of hornblende, occurs 
at the GuUakenee mine, Glay County. It has a bright color between 
emerald and~^ grass green, gradually passing into grayish green and 
greenish gray. Sp. gr. of the grass-green variety, 3'120. It is associ- 
ated with pink and ruby corundum and a feldspathic mineral. The 
analysis of the pure material gave Thomas M. Ghatard — 

Silica 45-14 

Alamina 17-59 

Chromic oxide 0-79 

Ferrous oxide 3-45 

Nickelons oxide 0-21 

Magnesia 16-69 

Lime 12-51 

Boda 2-J5 

Potash 0-36 

Ignition (water) 1-34 ^ 

100-33 

ARFVED80NITE. 

A brownish black or greenish black hornblende-like mineral, is found 
associated with the andesite, zoisite, and corundum of the Gullowhee 
mine and Shooting Greek, Glay Gounty, and rarely at Gulsagee, Macon 
County, It is easily fusible and gives a strong yellow flame, and is 
thwefore probably arfvedsonite. An analysis of a black variety by 
J. L. Smith places it rather under the aluminous hornblende. He 
found : 

SiUca 45-90 

Alamina 13-34 

Ferric oxide 11-46 

Lime 12-20 

Magnesia 12-53 

Soda 3-39 

Water 0-66 



46 THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

CROCIDOLITE (f j 

This mineral I have received from Col. Joseph Willcox, and it is said 
to come from one of the western coanties of North Carolina. The physi- 
cal properties and the chemical tests which I have made indicate that it 
is crocldolite. .It consists of long, delicate fibers of a blae color, is 
insoluble in acids^ and fuses easily to a black glass, coloring the flame 
yellow. 

BBBTL. "^ 

Found in six-sided prisms, sometimes doubly terminated, from about 
half an inch to 4 inches in thickness, and from 1 to 6 inches in length; 
color yellowish and bluish gr^en, small pieces of the latter color some- 
times transparent enough to be cut for gems (aquamarine), associated 
with orthoclase, muscovite, tourmaline, etc., at Eay's mine, on Hur- 
ricane Mountain, Yancey County. Yellowish green crystals have been 
found at Buchanan mica mine, and elsewhere in Mitchell County. 
Clear green crystals occur at Balsam Gap mine, Buncombe County. 
Found also at the Carter mine, Madison County ; Thorn Mountain mine, 
Macon; Casher's Valley, Jackson; on Green Eiver, Henderson County; 
at B. Balch's, Catawba; Fort Defiance, Caldwell; at WelPs, Gaston 
Copnty. Some very large crystals were found (one 2 feet long and 7 
inches in diameter), 4 miles south of Bakersville, and at Grassy Creek 
mine of still larger size. Green crystals appear at Point Fizzle mine 
and elsewhere in this county, and on Green Eiver, Henderson County. 
The most beautiful varieties, similar to occurrences in Siberia, are found 
in Sharpe's Township, near Salem Church, at White Plains, Alexander 
County^ also in pale green or bluish green modified hexagonal prisms 
and pale bluish crystals. This is the locality of the emerald and hid- 
denite mine, and here for 8 years past have been found most magnificent 
crystal^of emerald as regards color, perfection of form, ai\,d crystallo- 
graphic interest. Beryl in yellowish green, hexagonal prisms is also 
found at Lackey's farm, near Liberty Church, and Isaac Price's farm, 
White Plains, Alexander County. It also occurs in yellowish green 
crystals in Catawba County; one bluish green, transparent crystal, im- 
planted in quartz, has been found at Capt. Mills's gold mine, in Burke 
County, and another of 1 inch diameter and 4 inches length, with 
a tourmaline crystal of the same length embedded in it. In greenish 
yellow and deep green crystals, similar to Siberian, in the South Moun- 
tains, 9 miles southeast of Morgan ton, Burke County, and in the Sugar 
Mountains; also at Shoup's Ford, at Dietz's, Huffman's, and Hilde- 
brand's. In smaller crystals it is found in Jackson County. 

I have analyzed a rounded, water worn, greenish pebble of beryl ex- 
hibiting an uncommonly perfect basal cleavage (for this species) from 
Alexander County, with the following results: 






OKNTH.] SILICATES— CHEYSOLITE. 

Silica 66-28 

Alumina 18.60 

Glucina 13-61 

Ferrous oxide ^ 0*22 

Alkalies undet. 

Ignition •• 0*83 

99-54 
Sp. gr., 2'703. 

CHRYSOLITB. 



47 



This is one of the most interesting minerals of North Carolina, where 
it forms large beds between the hornblende and granite rocks. It is 
unnecessarily called dnnyte, from the Dun Mountains in New Zealand 
where it occurs under hke cireum stances. It is generally of a yellow 
ish green color, but also greenish white, gray, and brownish green 
mostly finely granular, rarely foliated, occasionally in larger grains dis 
seminated through the fine-grained mass. Associated with chromite 
eustatite, actinolite, tremolite, asbestus, talc, chromite, and corundum 
at Gulsagee mine, near Franklin, Macon County; in Haywood County 
near Webster and Hogback, in Jackson County ; at Bald Creek aud 
at Hampton's^ Jack's Creek, and South Toe Eiver, 7 miles from Burns 
ville, Yancey County; 2^ miles south of Bakersville, in Mitchell County 
at Shooting Creek and Cullakenee mine. Clay County; at Bich Moun 
tain, Watauga County; at the Carter mine, in Madison County; on 
Ivy, Buncombe County ; near the forks of New Eiver, Ashe County 
on Little Eiver, Alleghany County ; and 4 miles south of Morgauton, 
Burke County. It is also found with bronzite, in hornblende rock, in 
Guilford County, and near Ealeigh, Wake County. I have analyzed 
two specimens from Webster, Jackson County, one (I) which was finely 
granular and of a pale greenish color, with a sp. gr., 3*280, the other 
(II) of a yellowish olive green color, and 3*252 sp. gr., and Thomas M. 
Ghatard onp from the Culsagee mine (III) : 



Loss by ignition 

Chromite 

SiUca 

Alumina , 

l*errotiB oxide.. 

Kiccolous 

Magnesia 

Lime 



I. 


II. 


lU. 


0-82 


0-76 


1-72 


0-58 
41-89 


1-83 
40-74 




41-58 


trace. 


trace. 


014 


7-30 


7-26 


7-49 


0-35 


0-39 


0-34 


4913 


49-18 


49-28 


006 


0-02 


0-11 


100-22 


100-18 


100-66 



The chrysolite is subject to extensive alterations, forming serpentine 
and talc with their usual associates. 



48 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



{BULL. 74. 



GARNET. 

Widely distribnted through the State, and a coustaDt constituent of 
many of the mica and hornblende slates, in which it occurs in minate 
dodecahedral and trapezohedral crystals of a brownish or brownish red 
color ; it also occurs in many of the talcose and chloritic slates ; larger 
trapezohedral crystals of a brownish red color, and sometimes almost 
black, are,frequently met with in the mica mines of Mitchell and Yan- 
cey counties ; imperfect dodecahedral crystals at Weaver's, Jeanstown, 
Rutherford County, and in talcose slate, in Eockingham, Oherokee, 
Madison, Surry, and msii/y other counties. The most beautiful and 
perfect crystals are large trapezohedra, of a brownish red color, from 
Burke, Caldwell, and Catawba counties. A very excellent locality is 
about 8 miles southeast of Morganton, in Burke County, where very 
bright red crystals are found, some weighing nearly 10 pounds. Several 
tons of garnet from this locality have been crushed into different grades 
of fineness and sent to market for the manufacture of '' sand-paper.?' 

Another good location is 4 miles from Marshall, where large crystals 
are found embedded in chlorite slate. Some of these garnets are nearly 
transparent, and when cut show a peculiar play of colors. 

In Alexander County, on Marshall's farm and elsewhere, garnets are 
found several inches in diameter. Large crystals and crystalline masses 
of a reddish brown garnet -are found near Franklin, Macon County, and 
on Toe River, Mitchell County. Of good red color it has been observed 
in the sands from gold washings in Burke, McDowell and Warren 
counties. The massive manganese garnet or spessartite is abundant 
at Jeanstown,Eutherford County; at Buckhorn, Chatham County; near 
Moore's mills, Stokes County; near Gold Hill, in Cabarrus County; near 
Brevard's forge, 1^ miles from the Vesuvius furnace; near Macpelah 
church, Lincoln County ; near the High ShoalS; and at Clubb's Moun- 
tain and Crowder's Mountain, Gaston County; near Madison, Booking- 
ham County; near Salem, Forsythe County; on Horse Creek, Ashe 
County; Linville Mountains and Bridgewater, Burke Coupty ; in Guil- 
ford County; at Thorn Mountain mine, Macon County; near Marion, 
McDowell County; at Buchanan mine, Mitchell County; OH Pacolet 
River, Polk County; at Weaver's, Rutherford County, and near Dob- 
son, Surry County. 

Mr. G. A. Koenig has analyzed a variety of manganese garnet or 
spessartite from Yancey County (I), and I that from near Salem^ For- 
syth County (II), which contain: 



Silicia 

Alumina 

Ferric oxide 

Manganoas oxide. 

Ferrous oxide 

Magnesia 

Lime 



Sp. gr., 4*14. 



I. 



35 80 

1906 

6-25 

28-64 

4-4d 

0-60 



99-84 



II. 



36-74 

16-55 

undet. 

25 80 

1426 

2-56 

4 09 

100-00 



GMTHl SILICATES — ^ZIRCON, VESUVIANITE. 49 

ZIBCON. 

Abundant with the gold sands of Barke^ McDowell, Polk, Buther- 
ford, Caldwell, Mecklenbarg, ifash, Warren, and other counties, in.very 
minute yellowish brown and brownish white, sometimes amethystine 
and pink crystals with many planes; large grayish brown crystals of 
zircons are found so abundant on the south side of the Blue Eidge near 
Green River, Henderson County, that Gen. Clingman easily obtained 
in a few weeks in 1869, 1,000 pounds of crystals. More recently, a com- 
mercial demand for zircons having arisen, over 30 tons of the mineral 
have been taken from this region. It is found here embedded in feld- 
spathic gneiss, and also in a similar association at the Jones's mine, near 
Coleman's station. Found also by Dr. Hunter at Well's farm, Gaston 
County. It is rarely found at Ray's mine. Hurricane Mountain, Yancey 
County, and the Flat Rock mine, Mitchell County. It has been ob- 
served in dark red brown crystals in the magnetite beds of the Unaka 
Mountains; an irregular large crystal of about 2 inches in length and 
a pale brownish gray color has been found by J. A. D. Stephenson near 
Statesville, Iredell County; and by the same, small crystals embedded 
in allanite, near Bethany church. 

Peculiar dark brown crystals from l-3mm. in size are found at Low's 
and Tibbet's mine, in Macon County, which may be zircon. They 
need fuller investigation. Hidden reports, from the gold sands of 
Brindletown, good crystals of the variety malacone. The latter arc 
jet black, with occasionally a grayish crust, and are larger than, and of 
different form from, the zircons directly associated with them. Sp. gr. 
4*087. The same authority reports the variety cyrtolite from several 
places, namely : ^ 

Masses and distinct crystals having curved faces and gray brown color have been 
met with at the Wiseman mica mine iu Mitchell County, associated with autunite, 
fergnsonitey and samarskite. Also at Mill's mine, near Brindletown, and at the xeno- 
time and polycrase locahty on the Dayis land, near Qreen Biver, in Henderson 
County. 

With the monazite at Mars Hill, Madison County, zircon crystals of 
considerable size are sometimes found. One such crystal, sp. gr. 4*507, 
was analyzed by me as follows : 

Loss on ignition 1*20 

Silica 31-83 

Zirconia 6342 

Ferric oxide 3-23 

9968 
VESUVIAXITE. 

A mineral resembling vesuvianite occurs in brownish green, indis- 
tinct, crystalline masses, intermixed with quartz, and associated with 
reddish brown garnet, in Macon County. 
Bull. 74 4k 



50 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

KPIDOTE. 

Epidote is found abaudantly in North Carolina, althongh fine crys- 
tals are exceedingly rare. The finest specimen which I have seen, is 
a crystal, in the cabinet of the University of Pennsylvania, from the 
gold washings of Rutherford County 3 it is strongly pleochroic, like the 
so called '^Puschkinite," from the auriferous sands of Katharinenburg, 
in the Ural Mountains. Fine crystals have been lately obtained by , 
Hidden, at Hampton's, Yancey County. Yellowish and brownish green j 
crystalline masses, sometimes with indistinct crystals, have been found 
near White's mill, Gaston County, and near Franklin, in Macon County. 
At the latter place occurs also a variety in short, stout crystals of a 
dark brown or greenish brown color (analysis below). In Mitchell 
County it is found in dark brownish green crystals and radiating masses. 
Crystals and crystalline masses in quartz at White Plains, Alexander 
County. Fragments of epidote in greenish crystals, also a granular 
variety, are frequently met with in the gold sands of Burke, McX>oweU, 
and Eutherford Counties. 

Epidote of olive green or grayish and brownish green color occurs 
massive as a frequent admixture of hornblende slate (notably in Mitch- 
ell County) or diorite, sometimes forming pure masses of epidosite, 
as at the foot of Grandfather Mountain, head of Watauga Eiver, Wa- ' 
tauga County. It occurs also abundantly and conspicuously, ae bright 
green amygdules in the chloritic amygdaloidal gneisses on Watauga 
Eiver. It constitutes, with a reddish feldspar, the so-called nnakyte 
rock, which may be seen at Marshall, Madison County, and down the 
French Broad in occasional seams and thin beds for several miles. It 
has also been found in many of the magnetic iron ore beds, as at Cran- 
berry, Mitchell County, at Smith's ore bed on Ivy, Madison County, 
in the beds on Horse Creek, Ashe County, at Buckhorn, Chatham 
County, etc. 

I have analyzed the brown epidote from Macon County, and found 
the sp. gr. 3*269, and its composition : 

Silica , 36-»5 

Alumina 25-82 

Ferric oxide 9*97 

Ferrous oxide 1*34 

Manganous oxide 0'56 

Magnesia 0*56 

Lime 21*86 

Ignition (water), 3*02 



100-08 

ALLANITB. 



Allanite is found in jet black or brownish black, slender crystals^ 
sometimes of 6 to 12 inches in length, and also in crystalline masses in 
a granite vein at Balsam Gap, Buncombe County. Also under similiur 

plronm^t^m^Q ^t tUe Bucbanw wine m^ Wisem^n'g mne^ M^t^ll^U 



I 



GENTB.] 



SILICATES — ^ZOISITE. 



51 



County, in unasaally perfect crystals 2cm. long by 1cm. thick. At 
the Hiddenite mine it occars in small, well polished prisms. In mas- 
sive form it occars near Bethauy church, Iredell County, in large 
quantities, with small crystals of zircon imbedded in it. 

Another promising locality is near Democrat P. O., Madison 
County. It has also been identified by Hidden among the minerals 
&om Brindletown, and from the Henderson County zircon mines. At 
some of the localities the allanite undergoes an alteration and changes 
into a pale brownish or brownish yellow mineral which has not been 
further examined. A mineral of an orange color from the Buchanan 
mine, resembling gummite, may be the so-called yttro-gum mite ^ the 
quantity at hand was too small and impure for analysis, but it contains 
uranic oxide and some of the rare earths of the cerium or yttrium groups. 

I have analyzed the allanite from Balsam Gap (I), and the Hiddenite 
mine (II) ; Dr. J. W. Mallet has examined the pitchy black variety 
from Wiseman's mine (HI), and Mr. Harry F. Keller that from Bethany 
Church (IV). The analyses are as follows : 



Sp. gp 

Silica.. 

Alumina 

Ferrio oxide 

Ferrous oxide 

Cerinm oxide 

Didyminm oxide ) 

Lanthannm oxide ^ 

Yttriam oxide > 

Erbinmozide ^ 

Manganese oxide 

Magnesia 

Lime 

Soda 

Potash 

Water 



. i. 


II. 


III. 


3-400 


8-005 




32-79 


3205 


39-03 


18-16 


22 93 


14-33 


1-64 


1104 


7-10 


1008 
607 

14-40 




5-22 




14-81 


1-53 


1-84 


0-85 


8-20 


1-23 


1-99 


trace. 


0-15 


1-28 


4-29 


10 95 


9-43 


17-47 


33 
12 
1-89 


0-54 
0-20 
3-64 






2-78 


99-75 


98.76 


99-95 



IV. 



3*63 



31-685 

17-330 

7 052 



10-110 
18-990 

1-120 

1-025 

0.540 
10-785 

0.210 
trace. 

1-460 



100-307 



ZOISITE. 



The beautiful variety of zoisite, "thulite," has been found in slender, 
rose-red crystals in the feldspars at the Flat Eock mine, Mitchell County. 
At the CuUakenee mine it is found as one of the products of the altera- 
tion of corundum. Some of the pink as well as the bluish gray corun- 
dum is changed into compact and cleavable columnar masses of zoisite 
of a grayish, greenish, and brownish white color. G. A. Koenig has 
analyzed the slightly greenish white cleavable variety (I), which has 
iresultecl from the alteri|.tion of pink corundum. I have made an analysis 



52 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BULL. 



of the white, slightly grayish zoisite (II), coutaioing still nuclei of a: 
altered bluish gray corundum : 



Sp.gr 

Silica 

Alumina 

Ferrio oxide , 

lianganous oxide 

Mngoesia 

Lime 

Soda (trace of lithia) 

Potaeh 

Loss by ignition 



I. 



100-27 



II. 



3-286 


3-224 


40-70 


39*86 


33-86 


33-84 


0-81 


1-62 


trace. 


trace. 


0-22 


0-18 


24-05 


23-82 


undet. 


0-22 


nndet. 


009 


0-63 


0-78 



100-41 



Some 40 years ago, about half a mile southwest of Silver Hill, while 
searching for the continuation of the vein, a grayish white, foliated and 
columnar mineral was found which had the appearance of zoisite. I^o 
further examination of it was made, and there is probably no specimen 
preserved. Dr. Hunter reports zoisite from Alleghany County, and it 
also occurs in Swain County. 



PHLOGOPITB. 



Small brownish scales of it have been found in the granular lime- 
stone of Bolejack's quarry, near German town, and at Martin's quarry on 

Snow Creek, Stokes County, on Walnut Creek, one mile from the French 

Broad Eiver, in Madison County, on Valley Kiyer, in Cherokee County^- 
and at Judge Pearson's, near the Yadkin Eiver, Yadkin County. It i^ 
found also near Coleman's Station, in Henderson County. 

BIOTITE. 

Biotite is a constituent of many of the granites, gneisses, and mic^^ 
schists of North Carolina. It is found only in small black or browifc— 
ish black plates or scales. The localities are too numerous for partita 
ular mention. It occurs in large plates and in very regular crystals i^^ 
the mica mines of Mitchell, Haywood, Yancey and especially Maconra 
notably at Lytle and Thorn Mountain mines. 

MUSCOVITE. 

The mica of the gneiss and mica schist is mostly muscovite, hen^:^ 
it is one of the commonest minerals of Forth Carolina. In a f^"^ 
localities it is found in beautiful crystals, for instance, with magnetit>^ 
at Buckhorn, in Chatham County, with quartz, at Hickory, Catawlc^ 
County, and with pyrite, in Stokes County. The most remarkal:>i 
crystals of muscovite are associated with the minerals of the Emera^l ^ 
and Hiddenite mine in Alexander County. They are hexagonal pla't5^' 
implanted edgewise on the walls of pockets, and are dusted over witii ^ 
cbloritic coating^ possibly of hisingerite (^q. v.), which gives the niic^^ 



^^^^^^ ftlUCiLTES — MUSCOVITE. 53 

a pecuWax 'bronzy appearance. An analysis by F. W. Clarke Is given 
below. 

Siuce the year 1868 mica has been mined in many places and has 
been obtained in large plates, at times over 3 feet in diameter, gener- 
ally of a brownish color, in masses or large crystals, associated with 
gray, smoky, or yellowish brown qnartz, orthoclase, albite, etc., in nu- 
merous localities in Macon, Jackson, Haywood, Buncombe, Ashe, Mc- 
Dowell, Mitchell, Yancey, Alexander, Cleveland, and other counties. A 
pink colored muscovite in fine scales, much resembling lepidolite, for 
which it was mistaken, occurs with mica at Bay's, mine in Yancey 
County, and at the Flat Bock mine in Mitchell County. 

A compact variety of this species, often in very fine cryptocrystalline 
scales or fibrous, radiating masses, frequently resulting from the alter- 
ation of corundum and other minerals, was formerly, under the impres- 
sion that it was distinct hydrous mineral, designated as damourite. 

Very fine white and yellowish white pearly scales are found with the 
cyanite at Crowder's and Clubb's mountains, which result from alter- 
ation of the cyanite. Under similar circumstances it is found in Yancey, 
Cherokee, and Iredell counties. A slaty variety, much resembling the 
pyrophyllite slates of Chatham and Moore Counties, occurs near Warm 
Springs, Madison County. The most interesting occurrence of mus- 
covite is that resulting from the alteration of corundum. In this con- 
nection it is found in many varieties. It is sometimes in compact 
masses, with a cryslialline structure and a yellowish white color, sur- 
rounding the corundum as at the Hask:ett mine, Macon County, or it 
envelops the nodules of corundum, as at Belt's Bridge, Iredell County, 
and has a very fine fibrous structure with delicate silky luster, the fine 
particles gradually assuming a scaly structure and large size. At 
Crowder^s and Clubb's mountains and Culsagee mine, Macon County, 
the muscovite, surrounding corundum, occurs in the form of small silver 
white scales, usually discolored by a thin coating of oxide of iron. At 
the Hogback mine, in Jackson, and especially in Haywood County, it 
occurs in a similar manner, but it frequently surrounds large masses of 
corundum with a compact or semi-fibrous coating with silky luster, 
which towards the margin becomes more crystalline and scaly; at the 
Presley mine, Haywood County, it is found in very fine scales, gradu- 
ally increasing to plates of an inch in diameter, and sometimes directly 
into large hexagonal crystals of 3 to 4 inches in diameter, still inclos- 
ing nuclei of the original mineral. 

The following have been analyzed in the laboratory of the U niversity 
of Pennsylvania, I to IV: 

I. The finely fibrous from Belt's Bridge, by Miss Mary T. Lewis. 
II. The fine scales from Crowder's Mountain, by Thos. M. Chatard. 

III. The fine scales from Culsagee, by Geo. A. Koenig. 

rv. Plates of about 1 inch in diameter from the Presley mine, by 
myselC 



54 



THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BULL. 74. 



Y. Carefully purified crystals from the Emerald and Hiddenite mine, 
analyzed by F. W. Clarke in the laboratory of the U. S. Oeologioal 
Survey. 
The following are the results : 



r 


I. 


II. 

2 860 


III. 


IV. 


V. 


Sd. er 




2-867 






Silica 








45-96 


43-51 


45-62 


44-89 


45-40 
110 

83*66 
2-36 
1*86 

trace. 
1.41 
8*33 
0.69 
5-46 


Titanic oxide ........... 


Alamina 


38-22 
0.61 


^ 37-85 

0-31 
0-42 

trace. 
1-04 

11-35 


35-93 
2-93 
0-34 

trace. 

trace. 
0-71 
9-40 


38-02 
1*96 
014 
0-30 

0-00 
10-26 


Ferric oxide l 


Magnesia 


Lime 


0-37 


Lithia 


Soda 


0-74 
9-21 


Potash 


Fluorine - 


Ignition 


4-89 


7-73 


4-93 


4-50 


Less oxy cen 


100-(>0 


102-21 


99-86 


100-67 


100-27 
0-29 












99*98 



The soft, pseudomorphous crystals in the form of staurolite from 
Cherokee County are probably muscovite. 

LABRADORITE. 

A white, and in some portions colorless, very lustrous, cleavable va- 
riety with very few triclinic striae, occurs at the CuUakenee mine, in Olay 
County. It has a sp. gr. of 2'62. I had it analyzed in the laboratory 
of the University of Pennsylvania by Mr. W. H. Jarden, who found : 

Silica 55-61 

Alumina 26*90 

Lime : 9*60 

Soda 6-97 

Potash 0-55 

Ignition (water) 0*35 

99-98 

It has been found in gray, granular, cleavabie masses, but only at a 
few localities. 

Near the road, 6 miles north of Burnsville, in Yancey County, it is 
associated with mica, garnet, etc., as one of the constituents of a strati- 
fied, rock; it occurs in a trap near the Tuckasegee Ford, half a mile 
from the Catawba Eiver, on the road to Charlotte, in Mecklenburg 
County ; also at Shiloh Church in Granville County, and in large crys- 
tals in the heavy trap on Toe Eiver below Bakersville, Mitchell County. 
The latter locality furnishes specimens which show slightly the play of 
bluish colors. It is one of the constituents of the cryptocrystalline trap- 
rock found throughout the State. 



GENTH.] 



SILICATES — ^ANDESITE, OLIGOCLASE. 



55 



ANDBSITB. 



In snow white and blaish white, cleavable masses, showing fine stri» 
upon the cleavage planes, associated with black hornblende or arfved- 
sonite at the Gnllakenee mine, Clay Coanty ; and from the same local- 
ity as a very fine-grained, white feldspar associated with zoisite and mar- 
garite, and like the latter, resulting from the alteration of corundum. 
Both have been analyzed — ^the first by G. A. Eoenig (I), the latter by 
T. M. Ohatard (II) : 



• 


I. 


II. 


Sd. ST 


2-611 


2-610 


SUica 


57-29 
26-62 
0-21 
015 
7 80 
6-75 
0-33 
1-43 


58-41 
25-93 
0-38 
018 
5-82 
6-45 
2-.0 
0.93 


AlamiDa 


Feiiic oxide 


MapTio<»ia 


liime 


Soda : 


Potash 


Loss bv ifirnition 


• 


100-48 


110-20 



There are similar white feldspars at the Hogback mine in Jackson 
Oonnty, and at the Onlsagee mine in Macon County, which may belong 
here. No others have been analyzed. 



OLIGOCLASE. 



A fine-grained, grayish white feldspar, through which minute parti- 
cles of black tourmaline are disseminated, occurs in considerable quan- 
tities at Gulsagee, Macon Oonnty, and at the Garter mine, in Madison 
County. In 1887, at the Hawk mica mine near Bakersville, a peculiar 
transpar^it oligoclase was discovered. It was of a faint greenish tint, 
and clear enough to cut small gems ; in fact, it resembled glass more 
than it did feldspar, especially as it contained stellate tufts of microliths. 
Analyses as follows : 

I. From Onlsagee, by J. L. Smith. 
II. From Culsagee, by Harry M. Keller. 
III. From Bakersville, by F. W. Clarke. 
lY. From Bakersville, by B. S. Sperry. 



Silica...... 

Alumina 

Ferric oxide 

Hanganeae oxide 

Lime 

Soda 

Potash.. 

IgniUon 



I. 



64-12 

24-20 

0-14 



2-80 
9-28 



100-54 



II. 



63-32 
25*19 



501 
802 
0-2$ 



-p. 



101-79 



IlL 

62-92 

25-32 

trace 

trace 

403 

618 

0-96 

0-25 



99-66 



IV. 



62.60 

23-52 

0-08 



4-47 
8-62 
056 
010 



&9-95 



Sp. gr. of the BakenvUle mineral, 2-651. 



56 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BULL. 74. 



A beautifal variety of " sunstone" oligoclase has been foand by Mr. 
J. A. D. Stephenson near Statesville, Iredell County, associated with 
yellowish white titanite. 



ALBme. 



It is found in large, cleavable masses of a white color, at Point Piz 
zle, Mitchell Ooupty, showing upon the cleavage planes more or less 
distinct striation. I had it analyzed in the laboratory of the University 
of Pennsylvania by Frank Julian (I), (see below). Sp. gr. 2-638. There 
are probably many of the white. and grayish or brownish white striated 
feldspars from mica mines, such as from the Gibbs mine, South Toe 
Elver, Yancey Oounty ; the Flat Bock mine and the Buchanan mine, in 
Mitchell County ; Ainslie's, in Jackson County ; and Thorn Mountain 
mine, in Macon ; and many others, which belong to this species or to 
oligoclase, which can be distinguished only by analysis. An inter- 
esting occurrence is that at the Presley mine, Haywood County, where 
it, together with muscovite, results from the alteration of corundum. 
Small white granular cleavable albite, and also compact masses, have 
been found at the Steele mine, Montgomery County, associated with 
prochlorite, gold, pyrite, sphalerite, etc. Finely crystallized at the 
Emerald mine, in Alexander County. 

Some of the granitic rocks 3 miles west of Leasburg, Caswell County, 
contain small grains of a triclinic feldspar, which may be albite. 

The compact grayish white variety from the Steele mine has been 
analyzed by Geo. J. Popplein (II) : 





I. 


n. 


Silica 


67-51 
20-46 
trace 


60-29 
19-66 
i*63 
trace 
0-23 
1-83 
9-00 
1-71 
1-20 


Alumina --.... ...-- 


Ferric oxide 


Manganese oxide ^.. 


Macnesia _ 


0*34 

3-08 

9-15 

trace 


Lime 


Soda 


Potash 


Loss bv ismition 






100-54 


99-46 



ORTHOCLA8E. 



This is one of the most widely distributed minerals in the State, 
forming an essential constituent of all the granite, gneiss, etc. It is 
found in beautiful crystals in a band of porphyritic granite, near Salis- 
bury, Eowan County ; the High Shoals and White's mill, in Gaston 
County; and on Hitchcock's Creek, and elsewhere in Bichmond 
County; also in the "chesterlite" form at Silver Hill, associated with 
pjTomorphite and quartz. Cleavable masses of orthoclase are found 



QL^se\«.\ 



^WACKTES — TOURMALINE. 



57 



at ^oup^a iatm, neat Statesville, and near Belt's Bridge, Iredell 
Coanty. A pecaliar variety with satiny luster upon the cleavage planes 
occurs in Clay Oounty, near Oullakenee. Large lamellar masses of a 
white, grayish or reddish color occur at Eay's mine, Yancey County ; 
at Flat Eock, Blalock's, and near Bakersville, in Mitchell County ; also 
in Caldwell County; at Hampton's Mining Creek, near Burnsville, 
Yancey County ; on Sugartown Turnpike, 10 miles from Franklin ; at 
the Whiteside Mountain, in Macon County ; on French Broad Eiver, 
in Madison County ; and in the mica mines everywhere. The Burnet 
mica mine. Buncombe County, furnished the museum with a crystal 
weighing 800 pounds. The peculiar compact variety of orthoclase 
which is spotted with hydrated sesquioxide of manganese, the so-called 
^'leopardite," is found near Charlotte, Meclslenburg County, and also 
in Gaston County. It is a variety of porphyry with crystals of quartz 
disseminated in it. I have made an analysis of the feldspatliic con- 
stituent, which has a yellowish white color and a cryptocrystalline 
structure (I). Miss Mary T. Lewis has analyzed in the laboratory of the 
University of Pennsylvania the orthoclase from Houp's farm, Iredell 
County (II). 



Silica 

Alumina. . . . 
Ferric o^de 
Magnesia . . . 

Lime 

Soda 

Potash 



I. 


11. 


75-92 
14-47 > 

0-88 > 

0-09 * 

02 

4-98 

4-01 


64-66 
20-60 

0-36 

trace. 

14 85 


100-01 


100-37 



TOURMALINE. 

The tourmalines, found in many localities in N'orth Carolina, are 
mostly of the black variety. A small, well terminated, transparen t green 
crystal was found by Col. Mills on Silver Creek, Burke County j also 
a black crystal 4 inches long, embedded in a green beryl crystal. Crys- 
tals of from 1 to 2 inches in size have been found near Mountain mine, 
Cleveland County j on Upper Little Eiver, Caldwell County ; at Hang- 
ing Dog Creek, in Cherokee; and in Eutherford, Mecklenburg, Yancey, 
Mitchell, Ma^on, Haywood, Transylvania, Polk, Buncombe, Caldwell, 
Stokes, Johnston, Wake, Granville, and other counties. In beautiful, 
well terminated crystals of 2 to 3 inches in length it is found in the South 
Mountains 16 miles southeast of Morganton, in Burke County ; also 
near King's mill, Tredell County ; and at Warren's, near Salem Church ; 
and at John Lackey's and Isaac Price's, on the White Plains, Alex- 
ander County. In slender black crystals, often radiating and needle- 
shaped, frequently flattened between the plates of muscovite, it is 



58 THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. {bvu^IL 

fonnd at Bay's mine, near Barnsville, where also a greenish and yellow- 
ish green, fibrous, and finely columnar variety occurs. It is frequently 
and in large masses associated with the corundum of Oulsagee mine, 
in Macon County. At the Oullakenee mine, Glay Oounty, it is found 
in small quantity ; also at the Hogback mine, Jackson Gounty, and with 
the corundum and muscovite at Belt's Bridge, in Iredell Gounty. A 
large outcrop of fibrous and granular tourmaline^ with quartz, is found 
about two hundred yards northeast of the Ellison mine, on the High 
Shoals property, in Oaston Gounty, and a peculiar finely striated va- 
riety, with quartz, at Glubb's Mountain; similar finely fibrous, wood- 
like masses occur at Leasburg, Gaswell Gounty, and in Wake. It has 
also been observed in the gold bands from Burke Gounty. Tourmaline 
rock and slate have been noticed at Kernersville, Guilford Gounty ; at 
Bee Bock, head of Turkey Greek, in McDowell Gounty ; at Jeanstown, 
Butherford Gounty, 6 miles south of Asheville, on the Hendersonville 
road, and in Cleveland Gounty. 

At the Emerald and Hiddenite mine, in Alexander Gounty, Mr. W. 
E. Hidden found some brilliant black crystals of tourmaline with fine, 
polished terminations. An analysis of this tourmaline, made by K. B. 
Biggs in the laboratory of the U. S. Geological Survey, gave results as 
follows : 

Silica..... 35-56 

Alumina 33*38 

Ferrous oxide 8*49 

Titanic oxide 0*55 

Manganbus oxide 0*04 

Lime 0*53 

Magnesia 5*44 

Soda 2-16 

Potash 0*24 

Water 3-63 

Boric oxide 10*40 

100-42 
Sp. gr., 3-13. 

FIBROLITE- 

A reddish white, finely fibrous mineral, with silky luster, from Ma- 
con Oounty, probably belongs to this species. 

A very interesting occurrence of fibrolite has lately beeuvdiscovered 
near Shoup's ford, in Burke Oounty, where it is the result of the alter- 
ation of corundum and envelops a core of the original mineral. The 
fibrolite may, in part, have been changed into muscovite, as it occurs 
in the micaschist of the neighborhood in small, needle-shaped crystals. 
A mineral resembling fibrolite is found in quartz in the gold gravel of 
Burke and McDowell Oonnties. 

CYANITE. 

This is one of the characteristic accessories in many of the mica and 
IfornbJende schists of Macon^ Haywood, Transylvania^ Yancey, Mitchell, 



e«»TH.) 



SILICATES — TOPAZ, EUCLASE. 



59 



Caldwell, Gatawba, Gaston, and other coauties, and is generally of a 
grayish white or gray color, and in imperfect crystals. Fine crystals 
otonr at Olabiys a.nd Growder's Mountains, Gaston Gonnty ; coarsely 
bladed masses of a blue and greenish color at Swannanoa Gap, Bun- 
combe County; also near Bay's mica mine, on Hurricane Mountain, and 
elsewhere in Yancey County ; Mitchell, Cherokee, and Wilkes counties; 
six miles east of Banbury, in Stokes County; and near DaT^idson College, 
Mecklenburg County. In blue and white bladed crystals in quartz at 
Hoover's farm, 6 miles: southwest of Statesville ; also in gravel near 
Statesville, Iredell County. A grayish white, radiating cyanite is 
found at Ararat Eiver, 4 miles southeast of Mount Airy, in Surry 
County, and a white cyanite at the foot of Barnett's Mountain, in Per- 
son County. Cyanite also occurs on Valley Eiver, in Cherokee ; at 
Tipton's, in Clay County ; in quartz at the head of Jonathan's Creek, in 
Haywood County; on Bear Creek, in Madison County; at the Buchanan 
mine, Mitchell County ; in the northwest comer of Wake County, and 
in Moore and elsewhere. At Hunting Creek, north of Statesville, 
rhetizite in columnar and radiating masses is found, resulting from the 
alteration of corundum. On Yellow Mountain, near Bakersville, cya- 
nite occurs in very deep blue crystals, equal in color to the finest sap- 
phire. Fine gems have been cut from this mineral. 

The white cyanite associated with the lazulite of Clubb's Mountain 
has been analyzed by Smith and Brush (I) ; and a brownish white 
variety from the gravel near Statesville (II) was analyzed by myself: 





I. 


11. 

0-38 

36-85 

63-15 

trace. 


IgDition ... ...... ...-.« 




Silica 


37-60 

60-40 

1-60 


AlaminA 


■ ferric oxide 




99-60 


100-38 



At many localities, notably in Cherokee County, cyanite occurs 
largely altered into a fine, scaly muscovite. 



TOPAZ. 



Topaz is reported as occurring at Crowder's Mountain, but it is very 
doubtfiil ; crystals from there, which were considered topaz, are cya- 
nite. The variety pycnite occurs in finely columnar aggregations of a 
yellowish and brownish yellow color, associated with garnets, near 
White's mill, Gaston County. 



EUCLASE. 



Gen. Clingman mentions a very handsome crystal of this rare mineral 
from the gold mine of the late Morril Mills, in the eastern part of Polk 
County. 



60 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

TITANITE. 

Gen. Glingman mentions titanite, or sphene, as oocorring in Ban- 
combe Ooanty. I have observed it at Morganton Springs, Borke 
County, in minute brown crystals ; in hornblende slate and in granite 
at White's mills, in Gaston County ; at Bogers's ore bank, near Dan- 
bury, in Stokes County; and on Hurricane Mountain, Yancey County, 
To this species probably belongs Prof. Shepard's very doubtful species, 
pyromelane, from the gold washings of McDowell County. Hidden re- 
ports titanite also in Alexander County. 

Shepard's xanthitane (q. v.) is an alteration of titanite from Green 
Biver, in Henderson County. It often contains unaltered titanite as a 
nucleus. 

I have analyzed a yellowish white titanite which occurs near States- 
villc, Iredell County, in mica schist, associated with sunstone oligoclase. 
The crystal was 15mm. broad and 2mm. thick. Sp. gr., 3*477. It con- 
tained — 

Silica 29-45 

Titanic oxide :J8-33 

Ferric oxide 1*61 

Manganous oxide trace 

Magnesia trace 

Lime .* 2911 

Lobs by ignition 0*60 

99-10 

8TAUR0LITE. 

Very large, brownish red crystals, from 2J to 3 inches in length and 
1 to 1^ inches wide, single individuals as well as twins, occur at the 
Parker mine, in Cherokee County. There are many other localities in 
Cherokee and Macon Counties where it occurs abundantly in argilla- 
ceous and talcose slates, as on Persimmon Creek and Hanging Dog 
Creek ; on Bear Creek, Madison County, and Tusquittah Creek, in Clay 
County. It is found in very small quantity with corundum and chlorite 
in small, reddish brown grains of vitreous luster, but without distinct 
form, at the Culsagee mine, Macon County. They have a sp. gr. of 
3*711. An analysis which I have made gave — 

Silica 27-91 

Alumina 52*92 

Ferric oxide 6*87 

Perrons oxide 7*80 

Magnesia 3*28 

Lime and manganous oxide traces 

Ignition (\7ater) 1*59 

100-37 
HYDROUS SILICATES. 

CHRYSOCOLLA. 

Inferior specimens, generally much mixed with other copper ores, 
Ifare been observed at many of the coppexrames', foT inBtance, at the 



t 



6IKTH.] 



SILICATES — CALAMINE, TALC. 



61 



Gardner Hill and Cambridge mines in Guilford County, the Pioneer 
Mills in Cabarrus County, the Gillis mine and at Mill Creek in Person 
County, Korthingtou's dam in Harnett County, Wolf Creek mine in 
Jackson County, at Welch's in Moore County, at Grupy mine and else- 
where in Bowan County, near Elkin in Surry County, the Hopewell in 
Mecklenburg County, at the Clegg mine and at Snipes' iron mine in 
Chatham County, Gap Creek mine in Ashe County, and many other 
places. 

CALAMUnS. 

The only specimen of calamine which I have observed came from 
Silver Hill, Davidson County, where it occurs sparingly as an incrusta- 
tion of fibrous and radiating structure upon argentiferous galenite. 

TALO. 

Besulting from the alteration of chrysolite, foliated talc of a white 
or greenish white color is found in. many of the chrysolite beds west 
of the Blue Eidge; at Shooting Creek, Clay County 5 Culsagee, Macon 
County; Webster, Jackson County; Hampton's, Miniug Creek, and 
Young's, on South Toe Eiver, Yancey County; near Bakersville, Mitch- 
ell (joanty, and other localities ; in sheets of three-quarters to one inch 
in thickness and of a somewhat columnar structure near Pilot Moun- 
tain, and near Dobson, Surry County ; fibrous talc with silky luster 
and of a white or green color, also compact crystalline white talc with 
a splintery structure, on Valley Eiver, Cherokee County^ and in Macon 
County. Talcose slate and coarse soapstone are found in many local- 
ities throughout the State ; it has been noted in some thirty conn- 
ties : for instance, near Belt's Bridge, Iredell County ; in the South 
Mountains of Burke County ; in Caldwell ; in Haywood County ; near 
Waynes ville; in the north of Wake County, etc. 1 have analyzed a speci- 
men from Webster, Jackson County (I), and Mr. J. B. Adger has an- 
alyzed a compact, faintly greenish variety found 8 miles from the mouth 
of the !Nantahala Biver (XI), as follows : 





I. 


IL 


Sd. err....... 




2^82 


Water 




•34 
64-44 

•48 
1-39 

•23 
33-19 


6-01 

57-72 

2-52 

•64 


Silica 


AlTunifiA r --- --.-.T. 


FerroQB oxide 


Nickel oxide 


MMnie^^a ........ x r - . r .w t , . n- 


33-76 




1W07 


100-65 



^1 



TKE M1!!(EBAL.8 OF NORTH CABOHNA. 



imaL.74, 



PYROPHYLUTE. 

In white, ^^ellowishy greenish, and brownish white, stellate aggrega- 
tions, and in fibrons and radiated masses at Cotton Stone Monntain, 
Montgomery County; also at Pilot Knob, Randolph Coauty; David- 
son College, Mecklenburg County; Hillsboro, Orange Connty; on Bow- 
lings Mountain, in southern Granville County, in great abundance; 
Crowder's and Ciubiys Mountains, .in Oaston County; and on lanville 
Mountain, McDowell County. The slaly variety forms large beds of 
yellowish white or greenish color in Chatham, Moore, and Orange 
Counties. 

A schistose imperfectly lamellar variety from the Deep Biver has been 
analyzed by Samuel T. Tyson (I), and a similar one, of a somewhat 
whiter color, from Carbonton, by O. D. Allen (II) : 





I. 


II. 


SD. StT...... ................................ .mm.m..»m.m. 


2-92 


2*88 


Kf^ft ^l...... ................................ .mm... .»»... 

Silica 


65-93 

I 2954 
5-40 


6<r-25 

27-91 

1-08 

5-25 


Alnmina...... ......................................... 


FerroTiB oxide. 


Water 




100-87 


100-49 



STILPNOBfELANE (f). 

A mineral, similar to stilpnomelane, has been found in compact 
greenish black masses at the Cosby mine, Cabarrus County. 

GLAUCONITK. 

The green grains forming one of the constituents of many of the so- 
called marl beds in the eastern part of the State are glauconite. It 
occurs in most of the counties of that section south of Tar Biver. 



SERPENTINE. 



The massive varieties are found in many localities. The best appears 
to come from the neighborhood of Patterson, Caldwell County. It 
has a dark, greenish black color, contains fine veins of the yellowish 
green, fibrous and silky chrysotile, and admits of a fine polish; greenish 
gray, massive serpentine, also with seams of greenish and grayish white 
chrysotile, is found at the Baker mine in Caldwell County, at which 
place are also found the varieties marmolite and picrolite; this last also 
occurs abundantly in the Buck Creek corundum mine. Clay County. 
Dark green serpentine has been observed in the neighborhood of Ashe- 
ville in Buncombe County, and in Forsythe and Wake Counties. A 
grayish or yellowish green serpentine occurs in Caldwell, Wilkes, Surry, 
Yancey, Stokes, Orange, and Wake Counties, and in the chrysolite 

l^eda of M^cou; J^ob^ou; Yaucey^ Mitchell; Watauga^ Burke, m4 Qt4ier 



GKNTH ] 



SILICATES — ^DEWEYLITE, CEBOLITE, ETC. 



63 



coanties ; it results from the decomposition of the chrysolite, which, 
however, is not always complete and gives rise to intermediate stages, 
in which we have to deal with mixtures of both species. Such a mix- 
tare from the Gullakenee mine, Glay County, has been analyzed by me 
(I), also a compact massive serpentine resembling the variety wiiliams*! 
ite, from the chrysolite beds of Webster (II). 

The picrolite from Buck Greek has been recently analyzed by Dr. E. 
A. Schneider, of thQ Geological Survey (III), who has also analyzed an 
alleged deweylite from Gorundum Hill (lY), which proves to be 6nly 
serpentine : 





I. 


II. 

48-87 
031 


III. 

4294 

1-72 
3-33 
1-88 
0*61 


IV. 

41*90 

0-71 

0-91 

iindot. 

010 


Siliea 


35-19 
0-64 


Alumina. .......................... 


Fftrric oxide ................... 


^erroiis oxidd. _.................... 


970 


717 
0-27 
trace 
38-63 
0-02 
9-65 
0-57 


Nickel oxide 


'M'n.TurA.nAUA ATido 




Masmeaia. ......................... 


40-99 


86-53 


40-16 


liime ...•.......«.....■>«««........ 


Water 


13-48 


13-21 


1616 


Ciiromite ...................a...... 










10000 


100-38 


100-22 


99-94 



DEWKTLITE. 



This mineral is found in all the chrysolite beds of the western coun- 
iies, in yellowish and greenish masses, in thin veins or seams through 
the decomposed rocks. 

For the supposed deweylite of Gorundum Hill see serpentine. 



CEROLITB. 



In small veins or seams in decomposed chrysolite at Gulsagee mine, 
Macon Gounty, forming white or yellowish masses. It has not been 
analyzed. 



GENTHITE. 



In amorphous apple-green coatings upon decomposing chrysolite, at 
Webster, Jackson Gounty, sparingly at the Gulsagee mine, Macon 
County, and also on Ivy Eiver, Buncombe Gounty. 



KAOLINITE. 



Snow- white. kaolin is found as the result of the decomposition of 
orthoclase at most of the mica mines in Mitchell, Yancey, Macon, Ashe, 
and other counties. Good qualities are found 6 or 7 miles from 
Kewton, Gatawba Gounty ; also in Lincoln, Burke, and many other 
counties. Glay for firebricks and e^^rtbenware occurs in many locali- 
ties tbroughpqt the State, 



64 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA* [buu..74 

SAPONITE. 

Foand in Mitchell Ooanty, near Bakersville, in the cavities of the 
cellalar hornBtone of the chrysolite ; popalarly known as mountain tal- 
low. Has not been analyzed. - 

HALLOTSXTE. 

Foand near Salem, t orsyth Coanty ; is of an olive green color and 
waxy laster. The variety lithomarge occurs in Barke County. 

A white, compact halloysite from Chatham County, analyzed by my- 
self, gave : 

Water 1778 

Silica 44-40 

Aluraina 3G-88 

Ferricoxide 0*95 

100-01 

FINITE. 

This mineral is found as a light gray to pale or dull greenish coating 
in the joints and seams and between the laminae of the conglomeritic 
and felsitic slates of the Huronian series in the middle counties, and 
also in the granulites of the Blue Bidge. Has not been analyzed. 

PARAGONITB.t 

Is found in the so-called talcoid and talco -micaceous schists of the 
Piedmont section, especially in Burke, Caldwell, and Catawba^ it is a 
common constituent of the soft brown and purple schists so common 
as to be characteristic of the region. It is also to be seen at Bound 
Knob, in McDowell, in the altered schists and slates exposed in the 
railroad cuts, in similar rocks in Wake County, near Baleigb, and in 
many other localities. Has not been analyzed. 

UISINGBRITE (T)* 

The chloritic dust which coats the mica and dolomite of the Emerald 
and Hiddenite mine, in Alexander County, probably belongs to this 
species. Partial analysis by F. W. Clarke : 

Ignition 20-50 

Silica 3116 

Alumina 8-06 

Ferric oxide 35-86 

Magnesia 5*43 

101-01 

The iron is undoubtedly present chiefly, but not wholly, as ferrous 
oxide; and the alumina is due to admixed mica. Very little material 

was available for the analysis. 

_____^_— ^-^-^_^_^^^-^^^— — f 

.^The species saponite, pinite, aud paragonite are inserted upon tlie authority' of the late Pzo£ W. 
C. Kerr. They need further inyestigatiou. 



GXHTU.] 



SILICATES— OUL8AGEE1TE, KEERITE. 



65 



CULSAGBBITB. 

The miDeral which I had described as jefferisite from Galsagee, has 
been distingaished by Prof. Josiah P. Cooke, jr., as culsageeite. It 
occurs in broad laminsB or plated masses of a yellowish brown color, 
sometimes 4 or 5 inches in diameter, which when heated exfoliate in a 
remarkable m^Chuer. It is also foaud at the same locality in gieenish, 
or brownish, yellow scales, not over one-eighth of an inch iu diameter. 
Both varieties have been analyzed, the former by Geo. A. Koenig (I), 
the latter by Thos. M. Ghatard (II). J. P. Gooke, jr., Uas also analyzed 
the large plates, bnt his analyses represent the mineral after having 
been dried at lOOo 0. (212oF.) by which operation it lost from 10-19 to 
10'27 per cent of water. 





1. 


11. 


III (dried). 
2-225 


Sd. ffT...... ........................ ........ 




\jy, |t^&.....a.. ...... ...... ....... ........... 

Silica 






33-93 

17-38 

5-42 

050 

0-35 

23-48 

J917 


34-00 

20-36 

4-91 

0-42 

0-57 

21-71 

18-50 


37-58 

19-73 

5-95 

0-58 


AlumlDft .................................. 


Ferric oxide 


Ferrons oxide .- 


Nickelons oxide 


Mftgnefilft -^»,.,, 


25-13 
1109 


Water 




100-18 


100 47 


10006 



It likewise occurs on Ivy Eiver near Garter's, Buncombe Gounty, 
at Garter's mine, Madison Gounty, and in Henderson Gounty, at Cole- 
man's Station. 



KERRITE. 



Consists of innumerable fine scales of pale greenish yellow color and 
pearly luster. Exfoliates when heated, but less so than culsageeite. 
From the Gulsagee mine. 

Analyses (I) by T. M. Ghatard, mean of two ; and (II) by E. A. 
Schneider : 



Sp.gr 

Silica 

Alumina 

Perrie oxide . . 
Ferrous oxiile 
Nickel oxide.. 
Cobalt oxide .. 

Magnesia 

Water 



I. 


n. 


2-303 






38 29 


38-13 


11-41 


11-22 


1-95 


2-28 


32 


018 


0.25 


48 




trace 
27-39 


20-40 


21-25 


20-47 


99-87 


100-15 



Bull. 74- 



66 THE MINEBA.LS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bll 

lIACONm. 

Closely resembles flne^ scaly calsageeite. Dark browu, with pei 
laster, incltuing to submetallic. Largely exfoliating, when hea 
Kumerous fti^ments of blaish gray corandnm are embedded in it. 

The carefally selected pure scales were analyzed by Thos. M. Ghati 
who found as the mean result of two analyses: 

Silica 34-22 

Alumina 21-53 

Ferriooxide 12-41 

Feiroos oxide 0*32 

Nickel oxide 012 

Magnesia 14-46 

Lithia trace 

Soda 0-51 

Potash 5-70 

Water 11-85 

101-12 
Sp. gr., 2-827. 

LUCASITE. 

Similar to calsageeite in appearance, yellowish brown in color, 
made up of small foliae, not over 2mm. in diameter^ also compact 
disseminated; basal cleavage eminent; laster sabmetaliic, somev 
greasy; exfoliates much on ignition; found associated with grass-g 
actinolite at Corundum Hill, Macon County; described by Dr. T 
Cbatard, whose analysis is as follows: 

Water, expelled at 110° C 3-78 

Water, at red heat 6-98 

Silica 31-81 

Alnmina 12*99 

Chromic oxide .-. . 0-54 

Ferric oxide 5-29 

Ferrons oxide 0-11 

Manganous oxide 0*05 

Magnesia ^. 24*83 

Lime 0-14 

Soda 0-20 

Potash 5*76 

100-48 

PENNINITE. 

The variety kammereritCy in violet and peach-blossom red sci 
is associated with chromite at Culsagee in Macon County, Webst< 
Jackson County; Hampton's, Mining Creek, Yancey County; ] 
Mountain, Watauga County, etc.; three-sided and six-sided pi 
crystals of a dark greenish and purplish color, associated with i 
etc., in the chrysolite beds at the same localities ; also at BakersT 
Mitchell County, and Scott's Creek, Jackson County. 



SILICATES — PBOCHLOBITE AKU CHLOfilTE. 



67 



psocacLosus (and cHLORirm). 

[ie-giaynd9.8ealy prochlorite, of a dark green oblor, rarely in worm- 
aggregatioin^ im fimnd assoeiated with an albitio rock, from an 
ation of which it has rawltedy at the Steele mine, Montgomery 
ity. At the Cnlsagee mine, piwblorite occurs as the result of the 
ation of corundum, often showing A* form and containing yet a 
of the original mineral. Frequently the corundum has first 
ged into spinel and the latter has subsequently been altered into 
[ilorite, but in either case, where it touches the original mineral, 
frequently of a fine, scaly, pseudo-fibrous structure and beooming 
I laminated at a greater distance. But this Is not always the case, 
iry often broadly foliated prochlorite is in immediate contact with 
ddum. Both the laminated and fine scaly form beds of consider- 
size. Under similar circumstances it is found at the Hogback 
• in Jackson Oonnty, at Shooting Creek in Olay County, near Mar- 
, at the Carter mine in Madison County, and at many other corun- 
mines. 

e so called corundophilite of Shepard, which was established by 
on the prochlorite of Marshall, has no existence in North Caro- 
Chlorite in scales and scaly aggregations is found in many of 
^old and copper mines in the State, and chloritic slate at many 
ities throughout the whole slate belt, and in many counties out- 
of it, both in the Huronian and Montalbau rocks, 
lave analyzed the broadly foliated dark green variety (I), and the 
scaly variety diverging from coruncjum (II), both from Culsagee; 
the fine scaly prochlorite from the Steele mine (III) : 





I. 

27-58 

22-75 

2-56 

5-43 

0-30 

28-47 
13 80 


II. 



20-48 

22-22 

0-70 

530 

O-U 

017 

30-09 

11-63 


III. 

24-00 

21-77 

4-60 

2421 


Silica 


Alumina 

Perric oxide 


Ferrous oxide 


Nickelous oxide i 

Ifanganous oxide > 

Masnesia 


1-15 
12-78 
10-50 


Water 




100-87 


100-60 


100-00 



3alyses of other specimens from Cnlsagee, made by Thos. M. Cha- 
and J. L. Smith, gave similar results. It will be seen from these 
Tses that they are varieties in which a large portion of the ferrous 
e is replaced by magnesia. 

massive chloritic mineral in aggregations of minute scales, much 
tnbling thuringite, has been found at Mount Pisgah, Iredell County, 
kTe made an analysis of it, but as it was too much oxidized, the 
unt of ferrous oxide could not be ascertained with accuracy, and 



68 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

therefore a doabt exists as to the species to which it belongs. The 
analysis gave: 

SiUca 24-22 

Alamina 19*34 

Ferric oxide 17*77 

Ferrous oxide 20*98 

Manganoas oxide 0*07 

Magnesia * 5*72 

Water 12*22 

100-32 

Several other chloqtic minerals from Oornndam Hill have been ana- 
lyzed by Dr. T. M. Chatard in the laboratory of the XJ. S, Geological 
Sdrvey, bat microscopic examination woald be necessary to establish 
identity of species. 

CHLORITOID. 

In small scales of a greenish black color, disseminated through slaty 
pyrophyllite, from Evans's mill, in Chatham County. I have made an 
analysis of the carefully parified scales: 

Silica 26*13 

Alumina 40*11 

Ferric oxide 3*44 

Ferrous oxide 23*01 

Mauganous oxide trace 

Magnesia 0*94 

Water 6 91 

100*54 
Sp. gr., 3-353. 

WILLCOXITE. 

Greenish and grayish white fine scales of a pearly loster, much re- 
sembling talc, occur occasionally as the result of the alteration of corun- 
dum. One specimen from Shooting Creek, Clay County, is a fragment 
of a semi-globular mass with a core of white corundum; it also occurs 
in small quantity at CuUakenee, Clay County, and probably at Culsagee, 
Macon County. . 

Both, that from Shooting Creek (I) and that from Cullakenee (II), 
have been analyzed by George A. Koenig: 



Silica 

Alamina 

Ferric oxide . . 
Ferrous oxide 

Magnesia 

Lithia 

Soda , 

Potash 

Water 



I. 

• 


ir. 


28-96 


29-60 


37-49 


37 56 


1-26 


1-40 


2-44 


2-38 


17-35 


17-20 


trace 


trace 


6-73 


6-24 


2-46 


2-42 


400 


8-82 


100-69 


100-03 



aXMTH.'l 



SILICATES — ^MARGARITE, DUDLEYITE. 



69 



MARQABITE. 

In small foliated masses of silver- white color and pearly Inster, some 
of the folia showing planes of crystals associated with the corandnm 
at the Galsagee mine (I); it has also been found with the mass of blae 
corundum found at Marshall, Madison County; but the most beautiful 
varieties are found at Oullakenee, Clay County, where it occurs in groups 
of laminated crystals, sometimes 2 inches long, 1^ wide, and five-eighths 
inches thick, of a slightly pinkish white color and pearly luster (II). 
These groups contain sometimes a nucleus of corundum, from which 
they are derived. The second variety from the same locality occurs in 
the form of broad laminae of a pinkish color, intermixed with corundum 
and associated with zoisite (III) ; a third variety from Cullakenee is 
found in thin seams of a grayish green color, which are an aggregate 
of minute pearly scales of a greenish white and sea green color (IV). 
It is found rarely in Hogback mine, Jackson County. The gray corun. 
dam from Penland's, Clay County, is surrounded by a white and yellow- 
ish-white cryptocrystalline and pseudofibrous margarite, and a similar 
incrustation is found upon the blue corundum at Crowder^s Mountain. 

A peculiar variety of soda margarite, of a compact and cryptocrys- 
talline structure, surrounds the hexagonal corundum crystals from 
Hendrix's farm, near Belt's Bridge, Iredell County. It has been ana- 
lyzed in the laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania by Frank 
Julian (V). I have analyzed the margarite from Culsagee (I) 5 Thos. 
M. Chatard the first variety (II), and I the second (III) and third (IV) 
varieties from Cullakenee : 





I. 

3087 


II 


III. 
3 055 


IV. 


V. 


Sd. er 


2 990 


3-064 




•^r 6* ■ -"•••• ......... ...... 

SUi«a.... 


2811 
49-16 


29*34 
48-73 


30-72 
49-83 


2963 

51-19 

0-13 

0-59 

1-09 

11-28 


33 10 
62'20 

trace 

8-44 


Alumina................... ...... 


Chromic oxido .............. .. 


ferrous oxide... ^.. 


0-43 
0-46 
1108 
0-45 
0-67 
0-22 
6-43 
3-31 


0-78 
0-78 
11-32 
trace 
2-61 
0-10 
6-55 


0-84 
0-76 
10-84 
trace 
2-19 
0-26 
621 


Magnesia 


Iiime........... ........ .......... 


Lithia 


Soda 


1-22 
0-20 
4-73 


2-69 
4-85 


Potash 


Water » 


Comndum 












100-31 


100-21 


101-65 


10006 


101-18 



DUDLEYITE. 



Found in small quantity in soft, bronze colored or brownish yellow 
scales with pearly luster, slightly exfoliating when heated. They are 
probably the result of the alteration of margarite, and are found with 
it rarely at the Cullakenee mine. Clay County. 



9 



70 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull.7< 

URANOTIL. 

About one-third of the so-called <* gammite ^ is an admixtare 
nranotil) bnt this mineral is also obtained in a nearly pare state by tl^e 
further decomposition of the nraninite or rather gummite. It is then 
found in apparently amorphous^ compact masses, without or with tk 
waxy luster, and a pale straw or lemon yellow color ; opaque and or 
uneven fracture ; sp. gr. 3.834; incrusting the gummite, but sometimes 
the whole mass of the nodnles'changed into uranotil. 

G^ie mean result of two analyses which I made is : 

Silica 13-72 

Uranic oxide 66*67 

Plumbic oxide 0'60 

Baryta 0'28 

Strontia 0-13 

Lime 6*67 

Phosphoric acid.... 0*29 

Water 12-02 

100-38 

From the Flat Bock mine, Mitchell County. Found also with gum- 
mite at the Deake, Lewis & McHone mines. 

The late Prof. W. 0. Kerr also reported " uranochre '' as a yellow to 
orange incrustation from Gibbs's mine, Yancey County, and the Flat 
Bock and Buchanan mines in Mitchell County. ^^ Zippeite " is given 
by him on the authority of Julien as occurring at the Higdon mine, 
Macon County. Both species are extremely doubtful, and may be only 
varieties of uranite and phosphoranylite. 

THORITB. 

Identified by Penfield both microscopically and chemically as a me* 
chanical admixture in the monazite sands of Brindletown, Burk^ 
County. 

AUBRLITK. 

A new species discovered by Hidden and Mackintosh at the Zircon 
mine, in Henderson County, and also at Price's farm, 3 miles south west 
of the first-named locality. Color, pale yellow to orange and brownish 
red. Hardness, 2*6 to 3 ; sp. gr. 4*4 to 4*766. Very brittle and easily 
crumbled. Form like zircon, and the crystals, simple in habit, are 
often attached to zircon in parallel position. Twins, like those of zir- 
con, have been observed. 



QiKS!ISL.\ 



Tk^TkLKTES, COLTTMBATES. 



71 



Analyses by MacVmtosb : 



Wkter 

Carbonic acid . . 

Silioa 

Phosphoric acid 
Thorium oxide . 

Ferric oxide 

Lime 

Mai^nesia 

Alumina, etc.. 



I. 



9 88 
100 



II. 



Ill 



\ 



11 21 

7m 
7-46 
70-13 
1-38 
0-49 
0*29 
1-10 



99*70 



8-25 
7-59 



The lemoQ yellow variety found on the Price land has a sp. gr. of 
4*03 to 4-08) and is richer in phosphoric acid and poorer in silica than 
the foi*egoing mineral. The data are water, 10-64 ; phosphoric acid, 
8*58 ; silica, 6*84. The thoria determination was lost. 

XANTHITANE. 

Although not a silicate this mineral may best be placed here. It 
occurs abundantly in the Zircon mine at Green Eiver, Henderson 
County, and is a yellow, earthy pseudomorph after titanite. The 
crystalline form is often well shown, and the xanthitane frequently 
contains an unaltered core of titanite, from which mineral it has been 
derived. Analysis by L. G. Eakins: 

Water lost at lOOo C 6-02 

Water lost at red heat 9-92 

Silica 1-64 

Titanic oxide 57-46 

AlamiDa 16'41 

Ferric oxide 4*16 

Lime 084 

Maj^nesia trace 

Phosphoric acid 3'89 

100-34 
Sp. gr., 2.941 at 24^ C. 

The mineral is evidently an aluminous clay, containing titanium in 
place of silicon. 

TANTALATES, COLUMBATES. 
PTROCHLORE OR MICROLITB. 

Microscopic brownish yellow or honey yellow grains, and crystals 
which appear to be octahedra with dodecahedral planes, are associated 
with orthoclase, tourmaline, etc., at Bay's mica mine, on Hurricane 
Mountain, Yancey County, and are probably pyrochlore or perhaps 
microlite. Larger octahedra are reported to have been found at the 
Flat Bock mine in Mitchell County, and were called microlite. I have 
never seen any; those sent to me as microlite were garnet. 



na 



'Y^^ UraiiTaikl.8 or NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BULL. 74. 



HATCHBTTOLITB. 



In octahedral crystals with cubical planes, of a yellowish brown color^ 
with grayish opalescence, resinous luster, and subconchoidal fhtcture. 
Hardness, 5; sp. gr., 4.851. 

Three analyses of it have been made by J. L. Smith, the mean results 
of which I give (I), and one by O. D. Allen (11) : 





I. 


II. 


Tantalic oxide 


) 


67-04 


29-83 

34-24 

1-61 

0-30 

trace 

15-50 

2-19 


Colnmbio oxide 

Titanic oxide 


} 


Tnngstic oxide 

Stannic oxide 

Plmnbic oxide..... 


::::::::::::::::::: 1 


0-75 

trace 

16-61 

224 

1-17 


Uranic oxide 


Ferrous oxide 


CeroiiB oxide ..^ > 


Tttria 




015 
8-87 
1-37 
trace 
4.49 


Mftfirnpflia ......r.- 


Lime 


7-31 


So«la 


Potash 


0-86 
4-87 


Loss bv icrnition 






99-86 


98.55 



Found with samarskite at Wiseman's mine, Mitchell County. 

TANTALITE. 

A massive variety of tantalite, weighing a few ounces, has been col- 
lected by the late Prof. F. H. Bradley, in Yancey County. It had a black 
color and a specific gravity of 6«88 ; and has been analyzed by W, J. 
Comstock, who found : 

Tantalic oxide 59'92 

Columbic oxide 23*63 

Ferrous oxide 12*86 

Manganoas oxide 3-06 

Magnesia 0*34 

99-81 

COLUMBITE. 

It occurs in crystals and crystalline masses of a black color em- 
bedded in the samarskite of Wiseman's mine, Mitchell County. It has 
also been found at the Deake mine and other localities in the same 
county, at Kay's mine in Yancey County, near Burnsvillej at Balsam 
Gap mine in Buncombe, and near Franklin, in Macon County. One 
crystal of it was kindly sent me by Mr. J. A. D. Stephenson, of States- 
ville, which he had found at Isaac Price's farm. White Plains, Alexander 
County. I have a crystal of about 2 inches in length, 1^ in width and 



t3ssrtw.\ 



TkiaTlLL.iLTES, COLUMBATES. 



73 



\ \n thickness, irora Oapt. MUls's mine, Barfce Coanty, which appears 
to belong to this species. 

J. L. Smith has analyzed the crystals (I) and massive varieties (II) 
from Wiseman's mine, and I that from Isaac Price's farm (III) : 





I. 


II. 

5-485 


UI. 


Sd. ex. --«- 


5-562 


5-758 


*jy, g& .......................... •■•■••.••••••. 

Colambic and tantalic oxides 


8006 
1-21 

1414 
5-2j 


80-82 
1-02 
8-73 
860 

trace 


79 90 
0-56 

15 14 
509 


TnnfiTstic and stannic oxides «....! 


!Ferroafl oxide 


Mancranons oxide 


C DDrio oxide 


• 






100-62 


9917 


100 92 



YTTROTANTALITE (f ) . 

According to Gen. Glingman, grains of this mineral have been fonnd 
in several localities in the western counties. It is probably fergusonite 
or samarskite. 



SAMARSKITE. 



It has been found in the gold sands of Bntherford County, in small 
bla^k grains and pebbles, sometimes weighing one-fourth of an ounce, 
which, when broken, had a vitreous resinous luster and a brownish 
black color, and a sp. gr. of 5*69. It is found also in the gold sands of 
Burke (at Capt. Mills's) and McDowell Counties. It has been analyzed 
by T. S. Hunt (I). 

About 5 years ago large masses, one of them weighing more than 20 
pounds, were found at Wiseman's mine, Mitchell County; usually in 
irregularly shaped pieces, sometimes coarsely crystallized, rarely in 
distinct modified rhombic prisms. The color is deep velvet black, 
in thin edges brown, the luster resinous, and the fracture conchoidal. 
Sp. gr., 5-72. 

It has been analyzed by Miss Ellen H. Swallow (now Mrs. E. H. 
Eichards) (II), J. L. Smith (III), and O. D. Allen (IV): 





I. 


II. 

54-96 

016 
9-91 

1402 
0-91 
517 

12-84 
0-52 


• III. 

5513 

0-31 

10-96 

11-74 

1-53 

4-24 

14-49 

trace. 


• IV. 


Colambic oxide > 


54-81 


37-20 

18-60 

0-08 

12-46 

10-90 

0-75 

4-25 

14-45 


Tantalic oxide > 

Tnn&rstic and stannic oxides ....... 


Uranic oxide ...... 


17 03 
1407 


Ferrous oxide 


Mansanons oxide 


Cerous oxide, etc 


3-95 
11-11 


Yttria 


Masncsia .................. 


liinio ......................... 




0-55 
1-12 


Lossbv ismition 


0-24 


66 
1-25 


0-72 


Insolable ...... 






' 1 


101-21 


100-40 


0912 


100-36 



74 



THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



[BUIX.74. 



Dr. Smith expresses his doubts aboat the tme nature of the ceroas 
oxide, etc., separated from the samarskite. This mineral has lately 
been the subject of investigation by numerous chemists, and several 
new elements, samarium, etc., have been discovered in it. The nature 
of these has not yet been sufficiently established to understand their 
exact relations. Samarskite has also been found in small pieces of 1 to 
3 ounces at the Grassy Greek mine, Mitchell Gounty, and in McDowell 
County. 

A mineral associated with samarskite, and probably a product of its 
decomposition, has erroneously been called euxenite. 

It occurs in reddish brown and hair-brown masses, translucent in thin 
fragments and with irregular to subconchoidal fracture, a yellowish 
brown streak, and a resinous to subadamantine luster. H&rdness, 5*5 
It has been analyzed by J. L. Smith (I) and M. H. Seaman (II): 



Sp.gr. 



Colambie oxide 

Stannic and tongstio oxides. 

Tttria 

Cerons oxide 

Lanthana and didymia. .^. . . . 

Uranio oxide 

Ferroas oxide 

Manganons oxide 

Lime 

Water 



\ 



I. 


-IL 


C 4-593 
] to 
( 4*642 


4-33 


5412 


4709 


0-21 


0-40 


2410 


13-46 
1-40 




400 
16-16 


963 


0-31 


709 


008 
5-53 




1-53 


6-70 


9-55 


99-58 


09-67 



BUTHERFORDITB. 

In monoclinic crystals and grains of a blackish brown color and 
vitreo-resinous luster and conchoidal fracture. Sp. gr., 5'55-^'69. 
A partial analysis by T. S. Hunt gave : 

Titanic oxide 58*5 

Lime lOH) 

Not determined ,... 31*5 

100-0 

In the gravel deposits of Eutherford and Burke Counties. 
These data give no clue to the identity of the mineral. It may be 
the same as the following. 

FERGUSOKITE. 

Found by Hidden in July, 1879, at Mills's gold mine, Brindletown, 
Burke County. It occurs in small, reddish brown to brownish black, 
tetragona), very acute pyramids, with basal and hemihedral planes, 



GKHTH.] 



TANTALATE8, COLUMBATES. 



75 



generally covered with a gray crust. Also found by Hidden at the 
Wiseman mine, in Mitchell County, in fine crystals, but with nothing 
new as to form. 

The Brindletown fergusonite has been analyzed by J. L. Smith (I) and 
J. W. Mallet (II), as follows : 



Sp. gr 

Colnmbic oxide 

Tantolic oxide 

Stannic and tungrstic oxides 

Tttria 

CeronB oxide 

Lanthana Hnd didymia 

TJranio oxide 

FerrtHis oxide ^.... 

Lime 

Water 



} 



I. 



5-87 



48*12 



40-20 

5.81 
2-76 



1-50 



98-38 



II. 



43 78 
4-08 
0-70 

37-21 
0-60 
3.49 
5-81 
1-81 
0-65 
1-62 



99-87 



POLYCRASB. 

Discovered by Hidden in decomposing granite on the Davis land, not 
far from the zircon mine in Henderson Gounty. It occurs in separate 
crystals, associated with zircon, monazite, xeuotime, cyrtolite, and mag- 
netite. More or less altered at the surface to a mineral resembling 
xanthitane or gummite; color, nearly coal black; sp. gr., 4*78. A par- 
tial analysis by Mackintosh gave as follows: 

Colnmbic oxide > 

Tantalic oxide >48'97 

Titanic oxide y 

Tttria, etc ^.... 27-55 

Ferric oxide 3*19 

Uranic oxide 13'77 

^Ignition 5*18 

98-66 

Additional experiments gave colnmbic oxide, 28*52, and titanic oxide, 
20*27. The same mineral also occurs near Marietta, South Carolina, 
which is in the same general region. 

R06RRSITB. 

In white mammillaiy crusts and little pearly beads upon samarskite 
at the Wiseman mine, Mitchell Gounty. Sp. gr., 3*313. 
It has been partially analyzed by J. L. Smith, who found : 



Colnmbio oxide 

Tttria, etc 

Water 



I. 



\ 



1810 
6012 
lT-41 



II. 



20-21 



V^V>. 



\ 



76 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bvllH. 

PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, ETC. 

XBKOTIMB. 

In miDnte tetragonal pyramids, in the sands flrom gold washings in 
Polk, McDowell, Burke, and Batherford Gonnties. In some sands which 
I have received from Gapt Mills's gold mine, in Burke Gonnty, there 
were a few peculiar crystals of a pale grayish or yellowish white color. 
They were tetragonal pyramids, but were irregular and rongh on the 
planes, and appeared to inclose some foreign substance, jierhaps zircon. 
One had a nucleus of a greenish yellow color and resinous luster, which 
resembled monazite. A few tests which have been made with a frag- 
ment of a crystal, which appeared pretty uniform in composition, gave 
reactions resembling those of zirconia, yttria, and phosphoric acid, with _ 
a minute trace of cerous oxide. 

Some very fine crystals of xenotime have also been found by Hidden^ 
at a locality about 3 miles from the Emerald mine, in Alexander County;^ 
sp. gr., 4*52. He also verifies the Brindletown mineral, and reports i1 
from the Davis la.nd on Green Biver, in Henderson Gounty. At boti 
the latter localities the xenotime crystals are sometimes symmetricall; 
compounded with zircon, like the crystals from Korway described b: 
Zschau. 

APATITE. 

This is rather a rare mineral in this State. I have observed it in im- 
perfect crystals of a grayish and reddish green color in orthoclase, etc, 
at Kay's mine. Hurricane Mountain, Yancey Gounty, and in small 
granular patches of a greenish color in granite ; found 3 miles south 
of the Blue Eidge, 16 to 17 miles from Jefferson, on the road to Wilkes- 
borough ; found also in greenish white crystals, often inclosing quartz, 
sometimes from 2 to 3 inches in length and nearly 1 inch in thickness, 
implanted in albite, at Point Fizzle and at Gox's mine, Mitchell Gounty, 
and at the Presnel and Gugenheim mines, Yancey Gounty. 

Minute crystals of apatite of highly interesting forms, with many 
planes, are found at the Emerald and Hiddenite mine m Alexander 
Gounty ; and opaque, minute, hexagonal prisms with pyramidal and 
basal planes are found in cavities of orthoclase, associated with the 
zircons of Green Eiver, Henderson Gounty. 

Prof. W. B. Phillips has described phosphatic deposits similar to 
those of South Garolina, but nowhere in sufficient amount to give full 
assurance of economic importance, in eastern North Garolina in the 
counties of Duplin, Brunswick, Pender, and others. The best deposits 
opened occur 4 to 8 miles northeast of Magnolia, in Duplin Gounty, 
where they form thin, irregular beds from 8 to 12 inches in thickness in 
sand deposits from 3 to 5 feet below the ground. 



Q.Y^Sv'WVX 



1?HO«>PBATE8, ARSENATES, ETC. 



77 



PYROMORPUITB. 

This is one of the most beaatifal minerals foand in North Carolina, 
and formerly was quite abundant at the Silver Hill mine, which 
fornished very handsome specimens of hexagonal prisms and crystal- 
line aggregations of different shades from colorless to almost black, also 
honey and wax yellow, green, brown, etc.; less abundant, and mostly 
of a yellowish green color, it is found at Silver Valley, Davidson 
County. In green and yellowish green crystals at the Troutman and 
McMakin mines, in Cabarrus County ; also at the Stewart mine, in 
Union County, and in minute green crystals in the gold veins of the 
Baker and Miller mines, Caldwell County. 

MONAZITE. 



It is found in considerable quantities in small, brown, greenish, or 
yellowish brown monoclinic crystals in the gold sands of Eutherford, 
Polk, Alexander, Burke, and McDowell Counties; also in the neighbor- 
hood of Crowder's Mountain, Gaston County, and at Todd's Branch, in 
Mecklenburg County, where it occurs in association with diamond, zir- 
con, etc. 

Very fine crystals over an inch long were found by Hidden in Mitch- 
ell County. It is also found in mica-schist at the Deake mine, Mitchell 
County ; in feldspar at Ray's mine, Yancey County, and in large cleav- 
able masses, sometimes 3 to 4 inches across and of a yellowish brown 
color, from Mars Hill, Madison County. 

Monazite is especially abundant in the gold sands at Brindletown, 
Burke County. About 15 tons of a sand containing from 60 to 92 per 
cent of small crystals have been found, the color varying from wax 
yellow to cinnamon brown; sp. gr. 6'10. Analyzed by Penfield, in trip- 
licate, as follows: 



Phosphoric aoid 

Ceriam oxide 

Lanthanum oxide 

Didymium oxide 

Thoriam oxide 

SUica 

Water, or loss by ignition 



I. 


II. 


III. 


29-45 


29-20 


29-20 


31-38 


31-94 


30»77 


\ 30-67 


30-80 


3117 


6 68 


624 


6-56 


1-40 
0-20 






020 






99-78 











The thoria is due to admixed thorite. About 3 miles east of the 
Alexander County emerald mine some exceptionally fine crystals of 
monazite were founds says Hidden, associated "With smoky quartz, 
rntile, and xenotime. They were mostly transparent, highly polished, 
and of a fine essonitered color. They varied from one fourth to one- 



78 



THE HINEKALS OF NOSTB CABOLINA. 



[BULI..74. 



half an inch wide and from one-third to three-foarths of an inch long; 
sp. gr.j 5*203. Penfleld foand in this monazite only 1*48 per cent of 
ttaofia* 

VIVTANITB. 

Found in dark blnish green, slender crystals, in a compact nodule of 
tertiary marl, in Edgecombe County ; analyzed by W. B. Phillips, of 
the agricultural chemical station. It is a new and unnamed variety, 
resembling anglarite and ludlamite in its percentages of water (14) and 
iron oxide (56), but differing from both and occupying an intermediate 
position between them in containing equal percentages of both forms 
of the oxide— protoxide 28*05, sesquioxide 28*35. The normal ferrous 
oxi^e of vivianite is here, as usual, oxidized in part to the ferric form. 

OUVBNITB. 

Minute green crystals and brownish green, fibrous masses, associated 
with tetrahedrite, scorodite, etc., at George Ludwick's mine, in Cabar- 
rus County, appear to belong to this species. 

PSEUDOMALACHITB. 

In reniform and fibrous masses, of a dark emerald green color, at 
the McGinn and Wilson mines, in Mecklenburg County ; Cnllen's mine, 
in Cabarrus County ; Fisher Hill mine, in Guilford County ; at Glegg's 
mine, in Chatham County, and about 1 mile from the Soapstone quarry, 
in Moore County ; also at the Peach Bottom mine, in Alleghany Coanty. 

I have analyzed the pseudomalachite from the McGinn mine, which 
contains : 

Phosphoric acid 24*58 

Cupric oxide 68*60 

Water 6-86 



1(KH)4 



LAZULITE. 



In dark blue crystals and crystalline masses, in quartz, and asso- 
ciated with cyanite and muscovite at Crowder's and Clubb's Mountains, 
in Gaston County ; also in quartz, and with very little muscovite, at 
Coffee Gap, in the Sauratown Mountains, Stokes County. That from 
Clubb's Mountain has been analyzed by Smith and Brush, who found in 
two analyses : 





I. 


n. 


Su. ?r. ...... ..................................... 


3-122 




*-'V* 6*» •-•••• •••-•• ...•.•••••••••••.••••■••••-•.•••••••• 

PhoBDhoric acid ........•>.•■.............. 




4318 

31-22 

8-29 

1009 

5-68 

107 


44*15 

32-17 

805 

30-02 

550 

107 


AlnmiPll- - - r-- .-r,,-, T,..,.,,rr-,,,^.^ ^, 


Ferrous oxide 


Mftgn*sift-T .......x-r, T.- f-T-T 


Water 


Silica 




99-70 


100-90 



oiBTB.] PHOSPHATES, ABS£NAT£S, ETC. 79 

BCOBODITE. 

In small, leek green and yellowish green crystals, associated with 
tetrahedrite, quartz, etc., at George Ludwick's mine, in Oabarrus 
County. It is found in finely granular masses of a brownish or yellowish 
green color, associated with ieucopyrite, from the oxidation of which it 
is formed, at Drum's farm on the White Plains, Alexander County, and 
at Dr. Halyburton's, in Iredell County. 

WAVELUTE. 

Globular and hemispherical aggregations of white and grayish white 
wavellite, associated with silver, galenite, pyrite, etc., are rarely met 
with at Silver Hill, Davidson County. 

PHABMAC08IDERITB. 

Exceedingly minute crystals of this mineral, of a brownish green 
color, are associated with the scorodite of George Lndwick's mine, 
Cabarrus County. 

DDFRENITE. 

It is rarely met with in grayish green tufbs of silky luster with the 
so-called << black band " iron at Egypt, Chatham County. 

PHOSPHURANTLITE. 

In microscopic rectangular pearly scales or in pulverulent incrnsta- 
tions upon quartz, muscovite, and feldspar. Deep lemon yellow in 
color. 

I have made an analysis of a specimen, which appears to have been 
slightly contaminated with cerussite, and found the composition, after 
deducting the plumbic oxide, as follows : 

Uranic oxide 76*71 

Phosphoric acid 12*08 

Water 11*21 

Associated with autunite and other uranium minerals at the Flat 
Bock mine and Buchanan mine, Mitchell County. 

AUTUNITE. 

In beautiful nearly square scales or small crystals of a greenish, 
yellow or yellowish green color, upon quartz and feldspar at the Flat 
Bock and other mines, Mitchell County. Hidden also reports it from 
Alexander County. 

lOTEB. 

Crystalline crusts on mica slate at Nantahaleh Biver, in Cherokee 
County. 



80 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. (bull. 74. 

TUNaSTATES, MOLYBDATES, ETC. 
WOLFRAMITE. 

r 

In laminated masses with cnproscheelite and scheelite at the Cosby 
mine, and with barite at the Flowe mine, both in Oabarrus County; 
also, according to Oeu. Clingman, frequently in Butherford and Burke 
Counties. 

I have made an analysis of the wolfram, which forms the nuclei in 
the rhombic tungstate of lime and found: 

Ferrous oxide 19*80 

Maugauous oxide 5*35 

Lime 0-32 

Stannic oxide trace 

Tungstic oxide 75*79 

101-26 

Sp. gr., 7-496. 

RHOMBIC TUNGSTATE OF LIME. 

Associated with wolframite, in barite, at the Flowe mine, in Caba- . 
rus County, in small crystals and laminated masses of a yellowish ai 
grayish color, which frequently contain a nucleus of wolfram. 

SCHEELITE. 

Orange-colored tetragonal pyramids are found at the Flowe min ( 
yelloAvish brown and grayish imperfect crystalline masses <n.t the CosH&j 
mine; also at Cullen's mine, Cabarrus County, in rounded granuL ^i 
patches of a grayish-yellow color, with auriferous pyrite in quartz. i 
have analyzed the latter and found them composed of: 

Stannic oxide 0*13 

Tungstic oxide 79*52 

Cupric oxide 6*08 

Ferric oxide 0*18 

Lime 19*13 

99*22 

CUPROSCHEELITE. 

In yellowish green and siskin green pulverulent coatings upon scheel- 
ite at the Cosby mine, Cabarrus County. 

STOLZITE. 

A few small tetragonal pyramids of a bluish gray, and one small, 
somewhat barrel-shaped crystal of a grayish yellow color of this very 
rare mineral have been found in a lump of quartz, associated with 
sphalerite, at Silver Hill, Davidson County. 



jmrra.] SULPHATES, CHKOMATES, ETC. 81 

SULPHATES, GHBOMATES, ETO. 

BARITB. 

In small white tabular crystals, with pyromorphite and manganese 

Dies at the McMakin mine, PhcBnix mine, and White's mine, Gabarras 

County. The laminated and coarsely granular white variety at the 

Flo we mine and Orchard vein, in Cabarrus County ; a vein of the coarsely 

laminated, grayish white barite, at the Latta mine,, near Hillsboro', 

Orange County. It occurs coarsely granular, and has the appearance 

of white marble, at Ool. Walkup's, Union County. A vein of very 

white compact and granular barite of from 7 to 8 feet in width has been 

fonnd at Crowder's Mountain, Gaston County; west of the Blue Eidge, 

a vein of 8 feet in width exists at Chandler's, 9 miles below Marshall, 

in Madison County, where it is white and grayish white .in color, and 

of a granular structure, containing small patches of laminated barite ; 

also on Elkin Creek, in Wilkes County. 

AN6LKSITE. 

In small, tabular, rhombic prisms, with very few additional planes, 
u the brown, granular zincblendeof Silver Hill, Davidson County ; also, 
iccording to Oen. Clingman, at the Baker mine, in Caldwell County. 

CROCOITE. 

I have observed this rare mineral associated with gold and small 
liiantities of galenite in small cavities of saccharoidal quartz from 
N'ash County, in very minute, dark hyacinth red crystals. 

BCKLANTBRITE. 

As the result of the decomposition of pyrite, disseminated through 
^any of the mica slates, etc., of Rutherford, Cleveland, and other coun- 
ties, melanterite or copperas is formed, but no good crystallized speci- 
mens have come to my notice. 

GOSLARITE. 

In the water of the Silver Hill mine ; also in fine, fibrous, crystalline 
inasses upon sphalerite, formerly at the McMakin mine, Cabarrus 
County. 

CHALCANTHITB. 

Very fine ciystals, with granular and fibrous crystalline masses of 
*olpbate of copper, were formerly obtained from the upper works of 
the Silver Hill mine, Davidson County, principally at the 60-foot level. 
Bull. 74 6 



82 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [buluTI 

ALUNOGEN. 

I have onoe seen a beautiful specimen of fibrous, silky alunogenfrom 
the western counties, but could not learn the exact locality from which 
it came. It is found abundantly associated with melanterite, in Ruth- 
erford, Cleveland, aud other counties, but not in good specimens ; also 
in Iredell and Catawba Counties. 

MIST. 

This mineral has been observed in association withgalenite and pyrite, 
in pulverulent greenish yellow masses, at Flint Knob, Wilkes County. 

MONTANITB. 

This very rare tellurate of bismuth has been found with tetradymite 
at David Beck's mine in Davidson County, aud at Captain Mills's, in 
Burke County. The yellow " oxide of bismuth," observed by Dr. 
Asbury at the Asbury vein, in Gaston County, may belong to this 
species. ■\ 

An analysis which I have made of that from Davidson County gave: 

Ferric oxide 1'26 

Cupric oxide 1*04 

Bismuthic oxide 68*78 

Telluric acid 25*45 

Water 3-47 



10000 
OABBONATES. 

CALCITE. 

Perfect crystals are found at Whiteville, Columbus County, in marl, 
in the Clegg mine, Chatham County, aud at the Emerald and Hid- 
denite mine, in Alexander County. It occurs coarsely granular in a 
vein at Hoover's mine, about 6 miles from Silver Hill; at Moore's mine, 
10 miles southeast of Lexington ; in Ore Knob mine, Ashe County; aud 
rarely at Silver Hill, in Davidson County, and the Steele mine, Mont- 
gomery County. Small quantities of granular calcite were found in 
digging a well at Morrisville, Wake County. The granular varieties, 
which constitute marble, are sometimes f^nd associated with the com- 
pact varieties of limestone in the band which passes through North 
Carolina, from Stokes County through Catawba, Lincoln, and Gaston 
Counties; as, for instance, at the quarries of Martin on Snow Creek; of 
Bolejack, near German ton, in Stokes County ; l*faff in Forsyth ; Hooper, 
in Catawba ; and Stowe, in Lincoln County, and in the Eocene lime- 
stone of New Hanover County. A coarse, granular limestone occurs 
also at Goshen and at Haskett's, on Ellijay Creek, Macon County, 
and on Cullowhee Creek, Jackson County, again on Bear Creek and 
Walnut Creek and at Marshall, in Madison County. A veined gray 



L 



GMTH.] CABBONATES — DOLOMITE, MAGNESITE, ETC. 83 

and white marble is found at Powell's qaarry, near Catawba station, 
Gatawba County. Very beautiful varieties of white, pink, and gray 
marble are found abundantly at the Nantahaleh Eiver, Marble Creek, 
Valley Eiver, and other places in Cherokee County. A band of com- 
pact limestone, sometimes finely granular, is found in Turkey Cove 
and Cedar Cove and on Linnville Mountain and Graveyard Mountain, 
in McDowell County ; also in Jackson, Transylvania, and Henderson 
Counties, and at Warm Springs and on Shut In Creek and Laurel 
Eiver, Madison County. It is also found in small seams and crystal- 
line grains, replacing in part the orthoclase of a massive granite gneiss 
in Harnett County. i 

DOLOMITE; 

Dolomite of a grayish white color, resembling marble, is found on 
Valley Eiver, 10 miles from Murphy, Cherokee County ; and in mag- 
nificent rhombohedral crystals, often coated with hisingerite, at the 
Emerald and Hiddenite mine in Alexander County. 

MAGXESITE. 

The lamellar white and grayish variety, from which distinct cleavage 
crystals can be obtained, is found at McMakin's mine, Cabarrus County; 
disc, with chrysolite at Webster, Jackson County, and Hampton's, 
IMining Creek, Yancey County. At the latter locality are also found 
t^he white compact, and at Webster the white earthy and pulverulent 
"v^arieties. Breunnerite occurs in serpentine, 4 miles south of Morgan- 

<:^n, Burke County, and near Dobsou, Surry County. 

■» 

SIDEBITB. 

In fine rhombohedral crystals at the Emerald and Hiddenite mine, 

nd also formerly at the McCuUoch, the !N'orth Carolina, and several 

ther mines in G-uilfard County, where it occurred in considerable 

^■masses in the vein. In the same manner it is of frequent occurrence 

i n many of the gold veins of the State, especially in those which carry 

^3opj>er. It often forms almost the whole mass of the veins, frequently, 

^Qowever, decomposed into limonite, which still retains its rhombohe- 

^3ral form; for instance, at Conrad Hill in Davidson County, in Gas- 

^^jon County, at some of the mines in Eandolph County, and at the 

^DoBby mine in Cabarrus county. In smaller quantities it has been 

^^bserved in Stokes County and in some of the mines in Mecklenburg 

and Alexander Counties. A white cleavable variety occurs at the 

^adisill mine, near Charlotte. The earthy and argillaceous varieties 

of Biderite form large beds in the Triassic coal strata and cons tituta the 

^OHJaUed black band or ball ore at Farmville, Egypt, the Gulf, etc., in 

Chatham County. It is also found in compact, grayish brown nodules 

^HalifjEUL and Granville Counties. 



84 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. (bull. 71. 

RHODOCHROSITE. 

In small globalar pink and rose-red concretions, with earthy man- 

ganese, near Franklin, in Macon Oonnty ; also mixed with magnesite, 

talc, etc., in compact and granular masses, at the McMakin mine, Ga- 

barms County. • 

CERussrrE. 

The most beautiful crystallizations, single individuals as well as 
twins, were found at Silver Hill, immediately after the discovery of 
of the mine ; also white, yellowish, and greenish white, compact varie- 
ties, frequently highly argentiferous. A very interesting occurrence 
at the same mine is cerussite, pseudomorphous after pyrite. Yellow- 
ish white columnar cerussite occurs in Gaston County, Bhombic 
prisms with pyramidal planes, together with imperfect crystallizations 
and earthy masses, are found at Clegg's mine, Chatham County. At 
Elk Creek, in Wilkes County, earthy cerussite has been observed coat- 
ing galenite. It is also found at Baker mine in Caldwell County, and 
at Murphy, Cherokee County. 

MAIiACHITB. 

Malachite, in its varieties, fibrous, compact, and earthy, being the re- 
sult of the decomposition of other copper ores, is found in association 
with the latter in almost every copper mine in the State. The Guil- 
ford, Cabarrus, and Mecklenburg County copper mines contain it. I 
have observed the fibrous variety at Silver Hill and Conrad Hill, in 
Davidson County 5 the Gillis mine, in Person County ; theCheek mine, 
in Moore County, and both the fibrous and earthy malachite at Clegg's 
mine, in Chatham County. It has been found in the Brushy Moun- 
tains, Alexander County 5 the Peach Bottom mine, Alleghany County ; 
the Ore Knob mine, in Ashe County ; the Gap Creek mine, in Watauga 
County; the Cullowhee, Savannah, and Waryhut mines, in Jackson 
County ; near Sassafras Fork, in Granville County, and at many other 
localities too numerous to be mentioned. Pseudomorphs of malachite, 
after cubical cuprite, have been found at Cullen's mine, Cabarrus 
County. 

AZURITB. 

This variety of carbonate of copper is far less frequently met with. 
Small but very beautiful and perfect crystals are found at Clegg's 
mine and at Snipes's (iron) mine, in Chatham County, and at the Cheek 
mine, in Moore County. It is rare at the Cullen and Boger mine in 
Cabarrus County, the Wilson mine in Mecklenburg County, and at 
Wells's, Gaston County. 

BISMUTITK. 

In yellowish white concretions, often of a pearly luster, or white in- 
crustations upon gold-bearing quartz, at the Asbury mine, in Gaston 
Coanty, where it was discovered by Dr. Asbury. 



OBHTH.] 



MINERAL COAL, ORGANIC COMPOUNDS. 



85 



Bismatite has also been found in a narrow vein in Gasher Valley, Jack- 
son County, in small masses, the largest of the size of a pigeon's egg, of 
a light apple-green or dark gray, through yellow to light gray masses 
which are chalky white in the amorphous parts. Laminated, sometimes 
almost columnar. Sp. gr., 7*4 to 7*6. The analyses by Br. A. H. Chester 
gave : 



y 


I. 


11 (the 
pure). 

89-80 
8-10 
2-10 


l^ifnnnthic oxid« -,...... 


86-36 
7-79 
202 
3-6 


Carbonic dioxide 


Water 


Insoluble 




99-80 


100-00 



Quite recently (January, 1888) I have received the same mineral from 
Rev. C. D. Smittf, from Highlands, Macon County, where it occurs in 
amorphous, grayish white masses, associated with beryl, muscovite, etc. 



MINERAL COAL. 



ANTHRACITE. 



A very interesting occurrence of anthracite is that of masses with 
conchoidal fracture in the vein rock at the Clegg mine in Chatham 
County. The bituminous coal, both of the Deep and Dan Rivers, is 
frequently, especially near trap dikes, almost deprived of its hydro- 
carbons, often approaching true anthracite. 

BITUMINOUS COAL. 

'The greater portion of the coal in the Deep River beds is bituminous 
coal, the volatile matter varying from about 8 to 32 per cent. The Dan 
River coal, which I had opportunity to examine, is so-called semi- 
bituminous coal, that from near Stokesburg, Stokes County, containing 
about 10 per cent of volatile matter. 

LIGNITE OR BROWN COAL. 

Frequently met with in the marl beds of the eastern counties, and 
in the Trias of Granville County, on Tar River, and on Brown's Creek, 
Anson County. 



ORGANIC COMPOUNDS. 



SUCCINITE (AMBER). 



Found in lumps of several ounces weight in Pitt County and else* 
where, in the Tertiary marl beds of the eastern counties. 



SYNOPSIS OP MINERALS AND MINERAL LOCALITIES, BY COUN- 
TIES. 



ALAMANOE. 



Graham. — McAden mine: Gold;^pyrite; actinolite. 
NewlirCs. — Gold; pyrite; chalcopyrite. 
Holt mine. — Gold ; also at Anthouy mine. 

Dixon^a mine. — Gold on both sides of Haw Eiver, in placers; Boyd 
mine, in placers. 
Cane Creek Mountains. — Gold; epidote; chalcedony; magnetite. 
liFear Cane Creek Factory. — Pyrophyllite; halloysite. 

ALEXANDER. 

White Plains. — Scorodite; columbite; tourmaline (Lackey's and 
Price's); beryl (at Warren's, Lackey's, and Price's); rose qnartz; smoky 
quartz, also near Taylorsville; rutilein geniculated crystals, and acicu- 
lar crystals in limonite and in quartz; the latter also near Poplar 
Springs; spodumene, in emerald and yellowish green crystals (hidden- 
ite), in Sharpe's township. 

Barrett Mountain. — Graphite. 

Price and Keever place. — Beryl; tourmaline; columbite; autnnite; 
muscovite. 

Lead mine. — Amethyst. 

Boseman^s farm. — Milky quartz. 

Little Biver. — Tourmaline. 

Hiddenite Post-office. — (The Emerald and Hiddenite mine)-i»Emer- 
ald(!); beryl (!); monazite in fine crystals (!); spodumene, transparent, 
green, and yellowish crystals (!); apatite; calcite; dolomite (!); siderite; 
rutile(!); muscovite (!); hisingerite; tourmaline. 

Taylorsville. — Three miles distant, smoky quartz; rock crystal; tour- 
maline; beryl. 

Headwaters of Snow Creek. — Foliated talc; hematite. 

Bend of Catawba Biver. — Pyrope garnets. 

MarshalVs farm. — Garnets. 

Brushy Mountains. — Malachite; chalcopyrite; graphite; asbestus; 
tabular quartz. 

Elsewhere. — Green, brown, and black tourmaline; graphite; magnet- 
ite; tantalite; beryl, yellow, blue, green; quartz crystals with basal 
66 



GtNTH.] SYNOPSIS OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 87 

plane, also with other singular modifications, also smoky, yellow, and 
milky; monazite, var. tornerite; asbestns; pyrite; magnetite; chalco- 
pyrite; pyrolnsite; limonite, psendomorphous after siderite; siderite; 
kaolinite; ortboclase, large crystals (one of 40 pounds); biotite; mus- 
covite; ratile, very fine at Milholland's mill and at Bobt. Johnson's; 
tourmaline at B. Lyon's, with unusual terminal angles (Hidden). 

ALLiBGHANY. 

Peach Bottom mifie. — Pyrite; chalcopyrite ; malachite; galenite; cu- 
prite; sphalerite; molybdenite. 

Roaring Gap. — ^At H. Harris's, chalcopyrite (auriferous) ; bornite. 

T. BryarCs^ — Pyrite, 

Bullhead Mountain. — Cyanite ; magnetite ; garnet. ■ 

Elsewhere. — Graphite; chrysolite; gold, in placers ; martite; pyrite; 
calcite ; zoisite ; smoky quartz. 

ANSON. 

BoggavCs Cut. — Calcite; serpentine; rock crystal and cellular quartz; 
lignite. 

Mill Creek. — Muscovite. 

Peedee Station. — Orthoclase. 

Farm of T. J. Pack. — Siderite ; chalcopyrite ; quartz. 

Wade8horo\ — Two miles south, gold in vein. 

Elsewhere. — Quartz crystals of considerable size, at several points. 

ASHE. 

Blue Ridge, south of Jefferson. — Muscovite; black tourmaline. 

Eorse Or«^^.— At Hampton'ls: epidote; magnetite; manganese garnet, 
^t Gray bill's : magnetite; epidote. 

Helton Creek, near mouth. — Magnetite at Ballou's. 

Ore Knob mine. — Pyrite; calcite; chalcocite; arsenopyrite; mala- 
C3hite ; metallic copper. 

Jefferson. — Chalcopyrite, 2, 3, and 6 miles distant, and at Mulatto 
Zfountain; graphite in gneiss; chlorite at Willis's mine; hyalite at 
Foster's mica mine; muscovite, beryl, and garnet at Little Phcenix 
^^Bica mine; kaolio; tourmaline, 7 to 8 miles southeast; chrysolite, 6 
*3jiles east on Kew Eiver. * 

Three Top Mountain. — Tremolite. 

J^eto River (South Fork, near mouth), — Chrysolite ; chalcopyrite, mag- 
netite. 

Oap Creek {Copper Knob mine). — Gold; silver; hematite; epidote; 
^rnite; chalcocite; chalcopyrite; chrysocoUa; malachite. On Gap 
^I'eek: cyanite; hornblende. 

Shady Spring. — Asbestns. 

JilkKnob. — Chalcopyrite; epidote. 



88 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [mjLH, . 

Phoenix Mountain. — Rock crystal (I). 

Witherspoon mine, — Asbestiforin actioolite. i 

Elsewhere. — ^Azarite; cuprite; actinolite; talc; chlorite; asbestofl; | 

graphite. i 

BEAUFORT. \ 

! 

Siderite, in nodules; calcite in marl beds, and in the Bocene (bottom \ 

of Pamlico Biver, and on Blount's farm) ; pyrite. ] 



BERTIE. 



Oalcite, in marl beds. 



BLADEN. 



Oalcite, in marl beds. 



BRUNSWICK. 

Oalcite, in marl beds; glauconite, in green sand; phosphatic nodules. 

BUNCOMBE. 

A«^et?«7fe.-.-Meteoriciron (I); garnet; magnetite, at L.W.Sams's; fe^ 
rous chloride (!), in the meteorite; ochreous hematite; hornstone; ser- 
pentine; barite (I), granular, on Fox Branch, 10 miles below Asheville; 
on road to Burnsville, 14 miles north, chrysolite; 17J miles north, horn- 
blende; 19 to 20 miles north, pyrrhotite; magnetite; hematite; corun- 
dum with hornblende and culsageeite; serpentine; prochlorite; asbes- 
tus; actinolite: kaolin; jefferisite. 

Big Ivy, — Genthite, with chrysolite. 

Black Mountain, — Almandite garnet; eyanite at Bowlen's Pyramid. 

Flat Creek. — Foliated grnphite in gneiss. 

New Found Mountains. — Biotite. 

Balsam Gap mine. — Allauite(!); beryl; mnscovite; biotite; albite; 
black garnet ; columbite ; tourmaline. 

Cane Creek. — Calcite ; gold ; hematite ; limonite. 

Ivy River. — Chrysolite; chromite; hornstone ; genthite ; talc;asbes- 
tus; tremolite. 

Brushy Mountain mine. — Muscovite; kaolinite; orthoclase; albite. 

Ream'^s Creek. — Garnet, large crystals. 

Burnet mine. — Muscovite ; orthoclase crystals, large (100 to 1,000 
pounds). 

N.P. Watkins^s. — Corundum; eyanite; mnscovite; tourmaline; gar- 
net. 

French Broad River. — Six miles north of Asheville, meteoric iron (!). 

Hominy Creek. — Biotite. 

# 

Pisgah Mountain, — Ten miles southwest of Asheville, meteoric iron(I)i- 
Turkey Creek. — Limonite ; magnetite ; chlorite ; talc. 



Q1WTH.1 StNOPStS OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 89 

Swannanoa Gap. — Gorundam in cyaDite(!); mascovite ; 2 miles soath- 
west from gap; limonite; hornblende, one-quarter mile northwest j 
tour-maline, one-qnarter mile west. 

Swannanoa River, — ^Near Asheville, meteoric iron (!) with troilite ; 
actinolite ; black hornblende ; beryl ; 7 miles above Asheville, hema- 
tite ; 9 miles east of Asheville, serpentine. 

Oeorge Alexander's, — At mica mine: beryl; muscovite; kaolinite. 

Elsewhere, — Gold ; tourmaline ; massive, 6 miles south of Asheville 
and on French Broad, near Buck Shoal ; garnet ; hematite ; galeuite, 
at L. Fortune's; muscovite in many mica mines; beryl, blue; talc; 
columbite; garnet; menaccanite; bed of limonite, at Blackwell's, 12 
miles west of Asheville ; chrysolite; graphite. 

BUBKE. 

Brindletouon.'^AX Mills's gold mine, crystallized gold ; tetradymite ; 
montanite; brookite; anatase; rutile; zircon; malacon; cyrtolite; mona- 
zite; xenotime; samarskite; columbite; fergusonite; hydrofergusouite ; 
adelpholite (?); menaccanite; hematite; magnetite; chromite; limonite; 
pyrite; titanite; cyanite; fibrolite; corundum; muscovite; vermicu- 
lite; enstatite; hornblende, green and black; steatite; tourmaline, 
green and black; orthoclase; albite; zoisite (!) ; garnet; actinolite; 
beryl; talc; asbestus; quartz, clear, smoky, and amethystine; psilo- 
melane; arsenopyrite(t); allanite; thorite; diamond. (This list is fur- 
nished by W. E. Hidden, and includes all discoveries to the close of 
1889.) 

Bear's Knob, — Corundum with muscovite, 4 miles southeast. 

Brown Mountain, — Platinum, on Gen. Hoke's farm; fluorite; limon- 
ite; magnetite; albite; kaolinite; gold, in placers. 

Linnville Mountain, — Menaccanite; hematite; itacolumite(!); radiated 
pyrophyllite; limonite; graphite; meteoric iron. 

Bridgewater, — Manganese garnet; gold. 

Morganton, — Lead, 4 miles north; graphite, at Morganton and 6 miles 
i^outh; corundum altered to muscovite; quartz crystals; titanite at 
3d!organton Springs; pyrite; garnet; magnetite; chlorite (?). 

Pa>x Hill, — ^Gold(!); galenite. 

SeoWs Rill, — Gold; silver; cerargyrite; psilomelane; zircon; pyrite. 

Shoup^s Ford, — ^Beryl; garnet; corundum, in part altered to fibro- 
Ilite(!); gold; magnetite; menaccanite; cyanite; tourmaline. 

South Mountains. — Quartz crystals, inclosing liquid (!); garnet in 
trapezohedral crystals (!); granular hornblende; graphite, 8 miles south- 
east of Morganton; at Col. Gaither's 12 miles south of Morganton, goldin 
veins and placers; beryl (!),yellowish green and deep green (aquamarine), 
9 miles southeast of Morganton; tourmaline (!), 16 miles southeast of 
Morganton; 4to6milessouthof Morganton, serpentine; talc; chlorite; 
actinolite; hematite; magnetite; asbestus; magnesite; breunnerite; 
chrysolite; garnet; tremolite; corundum, on lands of Korth Carolina 
State Company ; arsenopy rite. 



90 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. ' [BtJLL.M. 

Piedmont Springs. — Four miles west, tonrmaline. 

Glen Alpine Springs, — Talc. 

Whitens Knob, — One mile sontb, yellow ocher. 

Sugar Mountains, — Quartz crystals, with double terminations, etc.; 
asbestas; gold; ratile; magnetite; beryl. 

B. Havenar^s farm, — Tourmaline; musoovite. 

J.Suffman^sfarm. — Beryl; epidote; actinolite. 

Laurel road. — Kine miles from Morganton; garnets, large. 

J. London^ s farm. — Epidote; garnet; pyrite; gold. 

Tat^sfarm. — Gold in placers. 

Q. Deits^s farm. — Beryl; tourmaline; albite; sagenite. 

Hildehrand?s farm. — Sagenite; beryl; asbestus; rutile. 

Van Horn^sfarm. — Quartz crystals, inclosing fluid; quartz crystals, 
with basal plane ; quartz crystals, smoky ; sagenite ; garnet. 

(The last eight localities are furnished by Humphreys.) 

Elsewhere, — In the gold gravel and sands of the county occpr gold; 
palladium (f) ; corundum ; menaccanite; chromite; rutile; anatase; 
brookite(!); pyrope; zircon (!) ; epidote; tourmaline, black and green; 
flbrolite ; xenotime (!) ; monazite (!) ; wolframite (?) ; limonite ; magnet- 
ite; hematite. 

CABARRUS. 

Gold in many veins and placers; meteoric stone; sulphur; chalco- 
pyrite; magnetite; limonite. 

Daniel Barnhardfs farm. — Barnhard ti te. 

Barringerh mine. — Gold ; arsenopyrite. 

Boger^smine. — Tetradymite(!); chalcopyrite ; azurite. 

Concord. — Eose quartz; hyalite; agate (also at Harrisburg) ; chalco- 
pyrite; malachite.; gold; bornite; asbestus, in rose quartz; tourma- 
line; magnetite; galenite. 

Coshy^s mine. — Stilpnomelane (?); wolframite; scheelite(!); cupro- 
scheelite; siderite; barite. 

Cullen^s mine, — Tetradymite (!) ; cuprite in cubes (!); pseudomala- 
chite ; scheelite (!) ; malachite, in part pseudomorphous after cuprite (1); 
azurite. 

Flowers mine. — Wolframite (!) ; rhombic tungstate of lime (!); scheel- 
ite (!); barite. 

Near Gold Rill. — Manganese garnet ; magnetite. 

House's mill, — Hematite. 

Oeorge LudwicWsmine. — Gold; arsenopyrite (!); tetrahedrite(!); sco- 
rodite(!); pharmacosiderite ; olivenite; pyrite; chalcopyrite. 

MeMakin^s mine, — Silver; argentite; galenite; sphalerite; prous- 
titeC?); tetrahedrite, var. freibergite (! !) ; pyrolusite; pyromorphite; 
barite; goslarite; rhodochrosite ; magnesite; calcite; wad; barite; 
talc. 

jffarri«5wr^.— ^Quartz crystals ; agate. 



QMiTH.l SYNOPSIS OP MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 91 

Phoenix mine. — Gold; tetradymite (!) ; in Orchard vein, barite; py- 
rite; chalcopyrite. 

Love miney North Barrier^ FurnesSj Elwood^ and No. 3, a group of 
mines around Phoenix. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. 
' Long*8 mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite j galenite. 

OrowelVs mine. — Gold; pyrite; galenite. 

Newell mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. . 

Pharr mine. —Gold, in veins and placers ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. 

Fisher mine. — ^Near Concord : gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. 

Blackwelder mine. — Gold. 

Barrier mines. — North, Middle and South Barrier : Gold ; pyrite. 

California mine. — Gold ; pyrite. 

Pioneer mills. — ^Molybdenite; chalcocite; chalcopyrite; bamhardtite; 
molybdite; chrysocoUa. 

Reed's mine. — Gold (! I). 

0[}routman^s mine. — Sphalerite ; pyromorphite. 

Union mine. — Copper in arborescent crystals (!) and plates; chalco- 
[^ite; chalcopyrite; cuprite (!), in octrahedra ; malachite, fibrous. 

Whites mine^ — Chalcopyrite ; aikinite (?). 

Elsewhere. — Gold ; pyrite ; agate ; barite ; galenite ; sphalerite ; mag- 
aetite; steatite. 

CALDWELL. 

BaJcer^s mine. — Galenite; serpentine; picrolite; chry8otile(!); chryso- 
lite; pyromorphite; anglesite; cerussite; asbestus; marmolite; psilome- 
lane; chromite. 

Buffalo River. — At Patterson's mill : pyrite in quartz. 
Lenoir. — Magnetite; native sulphur in quartz (!); psilomelane, 4 
^iles west; asbestus, 6 miles east; hornblende, 6 miles west; amianthus, 
^5 miles northwest. 
^ingh CreeJc. — ^Asbestns ; anthophyllite ; steatite. 
J^ustfs. — Kaolini te. 

JLittle John mine. — Gold (!); galenite; graphite. 
JMiller^s wtn^.— Gold ; galenite ; pyromorphite. 
^ori Defiance. — Tourmaline ; beryl ; graphite ; garnet. 
-Patterson. — Magnetite; hematite; menaccanite; compact serpentine. 
Wilson^s Creekj near mouth. — Serpentine : talc. 
Upper CreeJc. — Gold ; tourmaline ; limonite. 
Near Qrandmother Mountain. — Gold in placers ; pyrite ; quartz. 
TuttUPs mine. — Gold in placers. 

Bichlands. — Magnetite; hematite; chlorite; serpentine; talc ; martite. 
Middle Little River. — Limonite; paragonite (?); muscovite; hematite. 
Lower CreeJc. — Gold, in the gravel of most of its tributaries below 
-•^noir. 

Elsewhere. — Gold, in placers and veins; sulphur; cuprite; pyrite; 
^'tiartz crystals ; epidote ; muscovite; orthoclase; cyanite; malachite; 



92 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [buijl.74. 

toarmaline; paragonite (?), common in schists; mascovite; hematite; 
limonite ; chlorite ; tremolite. 



CAMDEN. 



Galcite in marl beds. 



CARTERET. 



Galcite in' marl beds. 



CASWELL. 



Meteoric iron (!); garnet; magnetite; pyrite. 

LecLshurg. — Albite (f ), 3 miles west of Leasburg; fibrous tourmaline (!); 
chlorite ; epidote. 

CATAWBA. 

Ball Creek mine. — Magnetite ; kaolinite. 

Bohersan mine, — Magnetite. 

Ahernathy mine. — Magnetite; 

Littl^ohn^g mine. — Limonite ; hematite. 

Hiehory. — Graphite, crystallized ; pyrite(!); alanogen; wad; amphi- 
bole; hematite; pyrolusite; limonite; quartz crystals; amethyst (!); 
garnet (!); muscovite; pyrrhotite; magnetite; chalcopyrite; calciteand 
pyrrhotite near Hickory; graphite, 2 miles southwest. 
' Hooper' 8 quarry. — Grauularcalcite; pyrite; gold; graphite ; tremolite. 

Newton. — Kaolin; magnetite, at the Barringer mines; pyrite; tabular 
quartz, 6 miles west and 10 miles northeast of iN^ewton. 

Keeversville. — Quartz crj'stals; muscovite. 

Bamacur^B. — Muscovite. 

PoweWs quarry. — Galcite, granular (!); pyrite. 

ShuforcPs mine. — Gold ; pyrite. 

ShuforcPs quarry. --ij'aloite} magnetite; rose quartz; amethyst. 

South Mountains. — Graphite; cyanite; garnet. 

Anderson^ 8 Mountain. — Magnetite; calcite; at Avery Shuford's,actin- 
olite. 

Forney^s mine. — Magnetite. 

Beards mine. — Magnetite. 

PowelVs factory. — Manganese garnet. 

Elsewhere. — Gold, in placers and veins; graphite; rutile, in acicular 
crystals in amethyst(!); rock crystal (!); quartz crystals inclosing 
liquid(!); beryl(!); garnet(!); cyanite; kaolinite; alunogen; wad; rutile 
in quartz (sagenite), at B. Lutz's; beryl; paragonite (f), common in 
the schistose rocks. 

E. Baleh^s farm. — Muscovite; garnets; amethyst; smoky quartz 
crystals containing liquid ; crystals of quartz with basal plane ; graph* 
ite ; black and brown touri^aline ; rutile (acicular) ; beryl (blue^ green^ 
jellow); feldspar. 



«»TH.] BTN0P8IS OF HINEBALS AND LOCALITIES. 93 

JT. BaleVsfarm. — ^Liquid-bearing quartz crystals ; gold ; sagenite. 

Widow BalcV%farm. — Sagenite; liquid-bearing quartz crystals, with 
basal plane ; tourmaline ; rose quartz. 

Rev, Huffinan^sfarm. — ^Tessellated quartz crystals ; same, liquid bear- 
ing^ menaccanite; sagenite. 

Spencer^s farm. — Quartz crystals doubly terminated; same, liquid- 
bearing; same, inclosing mica; same, with asbestus; same, with py rite; 
rntile in quartz crystals ; amethyst ; cyanite ; tourmaline ; magnetita 

Near Oanova. — Smoky quartz crystals, large ; crystals of amethyst, 
doubly terminated, inclosing rutile (yellow). 

CHATHAM. 

Biickhorn, — Hematite, foliated, granular, and micaceous ; magnetite; 
rutile in quartz ; manganese garnet ; muscovite ; psilomelane ; limon- 
ite; epidote. 
Carhonton. — Pyrophyllite slate (!) 

Olegg^smine. — ^Oalenite; bornite; chalcopyrite ; py rite in cubo-octa- 
hedra; cuprite; chrysocoUa; pseudomalachite (!) ; cerussite(!); mala- 
cMte(!), fibrous and earthy; azurite; anthracite; calcite; galenite; 
; prochlorite (I). 

I Deep River, — ^Pyrophyllite slate (!) ; anthracite ; bituminous coal. 
\ Egypt. — Siderite (black band and ball ore) ; dufrenite (!) 
Evanses mine, — Hematite ; chloritoid in pyrophyllite slate. 
TJnthanJ^s mine, — Magnetite. 

Farmville, — Siderite (!) (black band and ball ore) ; bituminous coal. 
Oulf, — Siderite (black band and ball ore) ; bituminous coal ; limo- 
xiite. 

Loekville, — One-half mile above Lockville, hornstone ; 7 miles west 
of Lockville, foliated and micaceous hematite ; 6 miles southeast of 
Xjockville, fine granular and compact hematite; 4 miles southeast, 
garnet. 

Kellyh ore bed. — Hematite (!) 
Glasses mine. — Magnetite. 

Fittsboro, — One-half mile west, kaolin ; 6 miles south, on Book Creek) 
ohalcopyrite (!) ; at Gum Spring, limonite, pseudomorphous after pyrite; 
7 miles west, kaolin ; 10 miles southwest, micaceous hematite ; 16 miles 
^est (B. J. Powell's), hematite ; magnetite. 
Fearrington^s mill, — Three miles west, hematite. 
Lindley^s mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. 
Earper^s Oross-Roa^s. — Kaolin. 
Eeahfs Bridge. — One mile east, wad. 

Ore HilU — Hematite, compact, foliated, and micaceous ; limonite (!) ; 
magnetite. 
Cane Greek. — ^Gold, in veins ; pyrite. 
William^s mine. — Galenite; chalcopyrite. 
\ BaUU?8 Dam.— Bose quartz; hematite; garnet; psilomelane, 



94 THE MINEBAL8 OF NORTH CAROLINA. lwju.71 

Bnipeffs mine, — Magnetite; epidote; chrysocolla; azarite. 
Danelhfs Creek* — Gold;, pyrite; chlorite. 

EUewhere. — Gold, in placers and veins; chalcopyrite, mouth of Bocky 
Biver; pinite; halite in brine ; amethyst; kaolin; halloysite. 

CHEROKEE. 

Hanging Dog Creek, — ^Tonrmaline ; limonite ; staurolite. 

Marble Creek. — Tremolite; talc; calcite, (granular), white, pink, 
gray (!). 

Murphy. — Galenite ; pyrolusite ; limonite (!) ; wad ; tremolite ; talc (!) ; 
cerussite; atKumberSix mine, calcite ; tremolite; gold; galenite (ar- 
gentiferous). 

Nantehaleh Biver, — Niter in slates ; calcite (!), granular, white, and 
pink; talc, massive white. 

Parker mine. — Staurolite (!); gold; garnet. 

Peachtree OraaA;.— Hematite; garnet; biotite; limonite; asbestus; red 
ocher; talc. 

Valley River, — Hematite; phlogopite; taic; calcite (granular); dolo- 
mite; yellow ocher; limonite; gold, in placers; staurolite; corun- 
dum in cyanite, half way between Murphy and Valleytown. 

Bra^stown Creek. — Gold in veins and placers; calcite; limonite. 

Notteley Biver.— -lAmomtQ) calcite; talc; staurolite; garnet. 

Valleytown, — Kutile ; at Whittaker's, brown ocher. 

Number Six mine, — Tremolite ; calcite. 

Beaverdam Creek, — Smokj" quartz (at mouth of Creek). 

EUewhere, — Gold in placers ; cyanite, more or less altered to musco- 
vite ; staurolite (!) ; pseudomorphs of muscovite after staurolite. The 
staurolite localities are 11^, 15^, and 17 miles west of Murphy, and 11 
miles from Ducktown, on the Morganton road. 

CHOWAN. 

Calcite, in marl beds. 

CLAY. 

Oullakenee mine. Buck Creek, — Corundum (!), white, gray, pink, and 
ruby, frequently altered iutoother minerals; spinel (!), rare; chromite(!) 
drnsy quartz; black hornblende or arfvedsouite (!) ; smaragdite ; chryso- 
lite (!); zoisite (!) ; andesite (!) ; labradorite (!) ; orthoclase (!) tourmaline; 
serpentine, massive and variety picrolite(!); willcoxite; margarite (!I); 
talc; albite; cyanite; enstatite; augite (?); prochlorite. 

Brasstown, — Micaceous hematite. 

Shooting Creek. — Corundum (!); pseudomorphous quartz after f^d- 
spar (!); actinolite; chrysolite; talc; prochlorite; willcoxite (!) ; mar- 
garite ; rock crystal ; magnetite ; cyanite ; muscovite ; gold in placers ; 
rutile in black crystals ; garnet ; pyrite ; chialcopyrite ; micaceous hem- 
ati'te/ limonite} prochlorite (!). 



G«TH.l SYNOPSIS OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 95 

Tmquittah Creek. — Gk)ld in placers and veins ; staarolite ; rutile. 
Tiptovfs. — Uorandum; cyanite (green) ; mnscovite. _ 

CLEVELAND. 

Whiteside mine. — Gold in placers. 

Mountain mine. — Bock crystal (!); tourmaline (!^; garnets; gold in 
placers; graphite; arsenopyrite ; galenite; muscovite (!); melanterite ; 
alanogen ; pyrite, abundant in gneiss and mica schists; tonrmaline. 

Cleveland Mills. — ^Two miles distant, limonite. 

Shelby. — Within a few miles, mnscovite in large plates ; magnetite ; 
actinolite ; tourmaline. 

Double Shoals. — Arsenopyrite. 

COLUISIBUS. 

Oalcite, in marl beds ; near White ville, in crystals. 

CEAVBN. 

Ualcite, in marl beds; glauconite, in greensand. 

CUMBERLAND. 

Petrified wood, Fayetteville; calcite, in tnarl bed; lignite, limonite. 

CURRITUCK. 

Oalcite, in marl beds. 

DARE — (None.) 

DAVIDSON. 

Cid mine. — Ohalcocite. 

David Beck's mine. — ^Tetradymite (!) ; montanite (!). 

Bosses mine. — Galenite, coarse grained. 

Conrad Rill. — Ohalcopyrite ; hematite; limonite; siderite; mala- 
^Ixite; barite. 

Allen mine. — Gold; pyrite; ohalcopyrite; arsenopyrite; tetradymite. 

JEmmons^s mine. — Ohalcopyrite ; pyrite. 

Loftin mine. — Ohalcopyrite ; pyrite. 

Miller^s mine. — Sphalerite ; ohalcopyrite. 

Harrises mine. — Gold; pyrite; ohalcopyrite. 

Moore^smine. — Galenite; pyrite; calcite. 

Silver Hill. — Silver (!); argentite; highly argentiferous galenite (!); 

^iC^halerite (!) ; chalcocite ; pyrite; ohalcopyrite; cuprite; melaconite; 

^oi8ite(f); orthoclase(!); calamine; pyromorphite(!!); green, yellow, 

^*rown, black, and colorless ; wavellite (I) ; stolzite (!) ; anglesite (!) ; gos- 

•-arite; chalcanthite (!) ; calcite; cerussite (! !) in line crystals, massive 

^Hd in pseadomorphs after pyrite ; malachite. 



96 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

Thomasville. — Bpidote; masoovite; biotite; magnetite; aagite. 
Silver Valley. — Ghaleuite; sphalerite; pyromorphite. 

Uharrie River. — Sphalerite. 
Btisaell mine, — Gold; pyrite. 

WarcPsmine. — Gold; electram(!); pyrite; chalcopyrite. 
DelJcmine. — Gold; limonite; hematite; pyrite. 
Laughlin mine. — Gold; limonite; hematite; pyrite. 
Miller mine. — Gold; pyrite; limonite; hematite. 
Brown mine. — Gold ; pyrite. 

Midway. — Gold; pyrite; chalcopyrite; chalcedony; homstone. 
Idck Creek. — Meteorite. 
Elsewhere. — Gold, in veins and placers; titaniferons magnetite. 

DAVIE. 

Magnetite; hematite, in several localities in beds; calcite, granular, 
on Yadkin river. 

DUPLIN. 

Calcite, in marl beds ; limonite ; glauconite; pyrite; lignite. 
Near Magnolia, phosphatic beds. 

DURHAM. 

Durham. — Pyrite, 

Near Knap of Beeds. — At James Woods's hematite (!) ; magnetite(!); 
steatite. 
Eed Mountain. — Epidote. 

EDaECOMBB. . 

Yivianite, in marl; limonite; glauconite; pyrite; lignite; kaolinite, 
near Battleboro; calcite in marl beds; radiated and tabular quartz at 
Bocky Mount. 

FORSYTH. 

Piaffes quarry. — Calcite, granular. 

Near Salem. — Magnetite, four miles south ; manganese garnet; hal- 
loysite; hematite; micaceous hematite; graphite; emery variety of 
corundum; wad; halloysite. 

Old Town. — Orthoclase; halloysite; asbestus; hematite; kaolin; 
talc. 

Near Kernersville. — ^Enstatite, var. bronzite; chrysolite; tourmaline; 
magnetite; hematite; chlorite; pyrite. 

Brookstown. — Oalcite; tremolite. 

Ulsewhere. — Titaniferons magnetite (I) ; gold; also pure magnetite (I); 
serpentine. 



GKHTH.] SYNOPSIS OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 97 

FRANKLIN. 

Portis mines. — Gold in placers (!) ; diamond (!) ; mascovite, in large 
plates; magnetite; asbestus; tabular quartz. 
FranJclin. — Kaolin. 

Near Louisburg. — Halloysite ; asbestus ; tabular quartz. 
Mann Arrington wine.— Franklinite (?). 
Laurel. — Muscovite. 

GASTON. 

Asbury^s mne.— Silver; tetradymite; galenite; pyrrhotite; pyrite; 
leucopyrite; auriferous arsenopy rite; bismite; scorodite; montanite(f^; 
cerussite ; bismutite (!). 

Cansler and Shuford wine.— Gold (!) ; galenite. 

ClubVs lfownfatn.-^Oorundum, red and blue (!), also mammilary (Dr. 
Hunter); rutile(!!); tourmaline, granular and fibrous; leopardite; 
cyanite (!) ; pyrophyllite (!) ; muscovite (!) ; lazulite (!) ; talc; quartz 
crystals ; margarite ; hematite ; muscovite ; manganese garnet ; mag- 
netite ; gold ; iron garnet. 

Clear Mountain. — Lazulite. 

Crowderh Mountain. — Corundum, red and blue (!), also variety emery; 
rntile (!); in crystals and granular ; gold; meuaccanite; cyanite (!); 
topaz (?); pyrophyllite (!) ; muscovite (!) ; monazite ; lazulite (!) ; barite, 
with galenite (argentiferous) ; hematite ; limonite ; sphalerite ; tourma- 
line; pyrite; chalcopyrite; manganese garnet; pyromorphite. 

Yellow Ridge. — Magnetite. 

Stowe^s Factory. — Magnetite. ^ 

Sloan mine. — Gold ; pyrite. 

BecWs. — Pyrolusite; manganese garnet; psilomelane. 

High Shoals. — One mile above, granular calcite. 

Ellison ore bank. — Hematite ; magnetite ; chlorite ; orthoclase ; epi- 
dote ; tourmaline. 

Ormond ore bank. — Limonite, compact and fibrous; psilomelane, nick- 
eliferous. 

Mountain mine. — Hematite, mammilary and cellular; pyrolusite j 
quartz. 

King^s Mountain. — Gold ; galenite ; altaite; chalcopyrite ; sphalerite ; 
tetrahedrite ; nagyagite ; magnetite; bismite; calcite; dolomite; pyr 
rliotite ; chalcopyrite ; limonite ; barite ; pyrite ; graphite ; cassiterite. 

Long Creek mine. — Nickeliferous psilomelane (!) ; gold; pyrite; fluo- 
rite ; sphalerite ; mispickel ; galenite. 

Duffie mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite ; also at B. Wells's mine. 

Oliver mine. — Gold ; silver ; galenite. 

Whitens mills. — Epidote ; biotite ; orthoclase (!) ; pycnite ; titanite. 
yfelh/sfarm. — Magnetite; hematite; pyrite; rutile ; garnet; zircon (?); 
beryl; tourmaline; monazite; asbestus; menaccanite; azurite; bor- 
nite (!). 

Bull, 74 7 



1 

98 THE MINERALS OP NOBTH CAROLINA. [bull-M. . 

Rhodesia mine, — Epidote ; aotinolite ; gold. 

Ferguson mine. — Magnetite ; pyrite. 

All-Healing Springs. — Barite. 

Elsewhere. — Sulphur; pyrite; magnetite; calcite; siderite; gold in 
placers and veins, at the Dew, Smith, Farrar, Beattie, McLean, High 
Shoals, and Gannon mines. 

OATES. 

Calcite, in marl beds. 

OBAHAM. 

Gohl; calcite, granular, white, and flesh-colored; talc; pyrite. 

GRANVILLE. 

Young'' s Cross Roads, — Gold; pyrite; two miles southeast, malachite. 

Near Oxford. — Magnetite; limonite; epidote; hematite; gold; lignite 
on Tar Kiver, near Crews's. 

Patterson mine. — !N^ative copper. 

Orissonu — Eustatite. 

Bowling^s Mountain. — Radiated pyrophyllite. 

Sassafras Fork. — Gold; pyrite; a few miles north, malachite; tour- 
maline; quartz crystals; agate. 

Near Shiloh Church. — Epidote; labradorite; calcite. 

Elsewhere. — Stibnite, in the northern part of the county, on land of 
N. A. Gregory. 

OREENi:. 

Limonite; siderite; glauconite; calcite in marl. 

GUILFORD. 

Cambridge mine. — Chalcocite; pyrite (!); chalcopyrite; barnhardtite; 
chrysocolla; malachite. 

Fisher Rill. — Gold; pyrite; chalcopyrite; magnetite; hematite^ meu- 
accanite; limonite; pseudomalachite; siderite. 

Beard mine. — Gold. 

Friendship. — Granular corundum (emery); titaniferous magnetite. 

Gardner Hill. — Bornite(?); chalcopyrite; chrysocolla; malachite. 

G^eerwftoro.-^Hornblende, at Polecat Creek ; pyroxene; pyrite; five 
miles west, gold; pyrite; chlorite; nine miles south, kaolinite, and also 
six miles west. 

High Point. — Graphite; talc; chalcopyrite; orthoclase. 

McLeansville. — Asbestus (!) in green quartz. 

Near Alamance Church. — Kaolinite. 

McGulloh mine. — Copper; cuprite in acicnlar crystals (!)j pyrite; 
chalcopyrite; siderite; malachite. 

Near Jamestown. — Gold; pyrite; steatite. 



OBNTH.] SYNOPSIS OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 99 

North Carolina (Fentress) mine, — Cuprite iu acicular crystals (I)^ py- 
rite; chalcopyrite; siderite; malachite. 

Phcenix mine, — Chalcopyrite; covellite. 

Elsewhere. — Gk)ld in veins; meteoric iron; molybdenite; limonite; 
rock crystal; pyrite; manganese garnet; magnetite; asbestas in green 
quartz (I), (Humphrey's) ; titaniferous magnetite^ with hematite and 
limonite, chlorite, in a double range of outcrops of 20 miles length 
across the northwest section of the county, from the head of Deep Eiver, 
on the Forsyth line, to the Eockingham line, near the Piedmont rail- 
road at Haw Biver; kaolin at 0. S. Leonard's, in the southern part of 
the county. 

HALIFAX. 

Near Bansowfs Bridge. — Gold in placers; pyrite. 

Fishing Creek. — ^Magnetite crystals and cubical pyrite in slate. 

Oaston. — Hematite, micaceous and granular; magnetite; chlorite; 
limonite; 6 miles south, Hines's place, hematite; magnetite. 

Elsewhere. — Petrified wood; epidote; zircon and garnet, in gold 
gravels; calcite and glauconitein marl; apatite; epidote. 

HABNETT. 

Harrington. — Calcite, granular. 

Near Buckhorn. — Hematite; r utile in quartz; epidote; prochlorite (t). 
Northington^s Dam. — ChrysocoUa; calcite, in gneiss rock. 
Idttle Biver. — Magnetite, several places. 
Douglass ore bed, — Magnetite. 
Chalk Level. — Limonite (bog ore). 
Sector^s Creek. — Smoky quartz. 

Elsewhere. — Talc; magnetite; kaolin, abundant at Spout Springs and 
at several other places. 

HAYWOOD. 

Big Bidge mine. — ^Muscovite; biotite; tourmaline; apatite; menac- 
canite; albite; autunite; kaolin. 

Waynesville. — Corundum; two miles above, talc; asbestus; tremolite; 
on Eichland creek, 2 miles below, psilomelane; garnet; limonite; mus- 
covit«; cyanite; 4 miles south, menaccauite. 

RaWsmine. — Chrysolite; corundum; talc; chlorite; tremolite. 

Presley mine. — Corundum, blue and gray, altered into muscovite and. 
albite; albite; muscovite in large crystals, also in scales cryptocrys- 
talline and compact. 

WilMnffs Creek. — Magnetite with limonite; chalcopyrite; pyrite. 

Cove Creek. — ^Psilomelane ; limonite. 

Pigeon Biver^ east fork. — Corundum; pyrrhotite; wad. 

Pigeon Biver^ west fork, — At SorrelPs mine, nickeliferous (!) pyr- 
riiotite. 



100 THE MINERALS OP NORTH CAROLINA. tBULL.74. 

Upper Pigeon Valley, — Graphite. 

Oround Hog Creek, — Galenite. 

Jonathan's Creek. — Cyanite; pyrrhotite; graphite; garnet. 

Ruc(^8 mine. — Opalescent quartz j pyrite ; garnet. 

Springdale, — Melanterite; pyrite. 

HENDERSON. 

Coleman's Station, — ^Zircon ; phlogopite ; jefferisite. 

Oreen River, — On south side of Blue Bidge, at Freeman's, zircon ; 
xanthitane; calcite, granular; titaniferous garnet at Jones's mine; 
auerlite; on Price's farm, zircon; auerlite; on the Davis land, poly- 
crase ; zircon ; monazite ; xenotime ; cyrtolite ; magnetite. 

Elsewhere. — Beryl; limonite; hematite; vermiculite; meteoric iron. 



HERTFORD. 



Galcite, in marl beds. 



HYDE — (None.) 

IREDELL. 

BeWs Bridge. — Pyrite in soapstone; corundum (!) in globular masses, 
partly altered into muscovite, etc. ; near Belt's Bridge, limonite; Hen- 
drick's farm, corundum in hexagonal crystals (!) partly altered into mar- 
garite; orthoclase; tourmaline; muscovite (I) soda-margarite at Hen- 
drick's farm. 

Center Point. At Beam's farm; limonite (!) pseudomorphous after 
nodular pyrite. 

Crawford's farm, — Quartz pseudomorphous after calcite. 

Damascus, — Menaccanite. 

Br. Halyhurton's, — Leucopyrite (!); scorodite. 

King's Mill. — Graphite (!) ; hematite in hexagonal plates in qnartz ; 
rutile (!), in quartz, at Mrs. Jordan's, Alex. Lackey's, Misses Bennett's, 
Thomas Adams's and Mrs. Smith's farms ; rock crystal (I); quartz crys- 
tals inclosing liquid (!); chalcedony ; tourmaline (!). 

Mount Pisgah, — Kutilated quartz (!) at Mrs. Daniel's farm; chloritic 
mineral resembling thuringite. 

Rocky Creek, — Graphite, 

Spring Mountain, — Graphite (!). 

Statesville. — Near Statesville, titanite in gneiss ; quartz crystals ; 6 
miles north, allanite; 8 miles southeast, on road to Salisbury, tremolite; 
2 miles west, corundum (!), rarely altered into cyanite (!); orthoclase (I) 
on Houp's farm ; cyanite (!), 2 miles west and 6 miles southwest of States- 
ville on Hoover's farm, with muscovite (!) ; 4 miles distant, goethite in 
thin scales, in light red feldspar (sunstone); 5 miles west, on John 
Sumpter's farm, rutile ; zircon ; cyanite ; transparent ripidolite. 7 miles 
north, on farm of G. W. Chipley, near South Yadkin Eiver, gray comn- 



oiwTH.] SYNOPSIS dF* MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 101 



dum in crystals. At States ville rock'qdarry, sariistonej titanite^ Horn-' 
blende in large crystals. 

Bethany Church. — ^Allanite, with small crystals of zircon; above 
Lock's Bridge, corandam altered into prochlorite and margarite. 

Hunting Creek. — ^Albite ; blue corundum altered into rhaetizite. On 
Sale's farm, near Campbell's Mill, large bowlders of cyanite inclosing 
crystals of blue corundum. 

Near Shiloh Church. — ^Eed ocher. 

Near Holland Springs^. — Quartz crystals. 

Davidson Township. — Quartz, inclosing transparent red goethite. 

Roclcwell. — Smoky quartz. 

£286tr%6re.— Marcasite; magnetite near Comb's, and on South Yad- 
kin Biver. 

JACKSON. 

Ca^her^s FaZ^.— Bismutite ; talc ; muscovite ; amethyst ; rock crys- 
tal ; gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. 

Cullowhee mine. — Ghalcocite; pyrite; melaconite; chalcopyrite (!) ; 
hornblende ; malachite. 

HogJmck mine. — Corundum (!); rutile in corundum, rare; chromite; 
drusy quartz; chrysolite (!) ; andesite (!); tourmaline; muscovite (!) ; 
dudleyite ; margarite (!). 

Savannah mine. — ^Chalcopyrite; hornblende; tourmaline ; malachite. 
Horse Cove. — Muscovite; beryl. 

Tennessee Creek. — Tremolite; grammatite; chlorite; actinolite; talc; 
asbestus ; prochlorite (t). 

Whiteside Mountain. — Garnet; orthoclase; tremolite; actinolite; 
chalcopyrite; magnetite; asbestus; muscovite; biotite; wad. 
Balsam Mountain.— ToxiTmalme ; pyrolusite ; chalcopyrite, 
Waryhutmine. — Chalcocite; chalcopyrite; cuprite; malachite. 
Oeorgetoum and Fairfield. — Gold in placers. 

Webster. — Corundum; chromite; pyrolusite; wad; chalcedony; drusy 
quartz; enstatite (!); tremolite \l)', actinolite (!); asbestus; chrysolite (!); 
talc (!); serpentine; marmolite; deweylite; geuthite; penninite (!); 
niagnesite (!), crystalline and earthy; magnetite; kaolin; kammererite; 
C miles north, chrysolite and enstatite; 10 miles west, hornblende. 

Wolf Creek mine. — Chalcocite; native copper; chrysocoUa; chalcopy- 
rite; malachite. 

Ainsli^s. — Chrysolite; chromite; talc; chlorite; enstatite; smarag- 
dite(f); asbestus; tremolite; garnet; actinolite; albite. 

SGotVs Creek. — Chrysolite; chromite; talc; penninite (var. kam- 
mererite) ; enstatite ; chlorite ; corundum (blue and pink). 
Toxaway River. — Calcite, granular, 

Elsewhere. — Gold in placers ; psilomelane ; calcite ; asbestus ; talc ; 
finionite ; muscovite in many mica mines ; galenite ; at Bryson's and 
in Hogback Valley, hematite ; at Dr. Morgan's, psilomelane. 



102 THE MINERALS. OV NORTH CABOLIKA. (Wu. tL 

JOHNSTON. 






JBtera^iow,— Olay ironstone ; pyrite. 
Leecliburg. — Limonite. 

Near Clayton. — Ghloritic talc slate ; graphite ; kaolin. 
Near Princeton — Epidote. 
Near Smithfield. — Limonite in many places. 

^Isewhere.-^FoA^il wood; kaolinite; magnetite; pyrite; toannaline; 
graphite ; epidote ; mascovite ; quartz crystals ; hematite. 

JONES. 

Oalcite, in marl beds ; limonite. 

LENOIR. 

Calcite, in marl beds ; glauconite, in green sand marl. 

LINCOLN. 

Lincolnton, — Calcite ; 12 miles northwest, reticulated acicular ratile; 
halloysite ; kaolinite ; graphite ; limonite, 7 miles northwest and 2 miles 
east ; on land of S. W. Childs, arsenopyrite. 

BrevarcPs Forge. — One and one half miles from Vesuvius furnace, 
magnetite (!) ; manganese garnet; quartz crystals. 

Cottage Home. — Diamond (!) ; gold ; chalcopyrite. 

Macpelah Church. — Manganese garnet; psilomelane; pyrite and chal- 
copyrite, 2 miles east. 

Oraham mine. — Chalcopyrite ; gold. 

McBee^s, — Psilomelane. 

Eeenerh quarry. — Chalcopyrite ; bornite. 

Iron station. — Yivianite. 

Randleman^s. — Quartz crystals; amethyst (!). 

Stow^s quarry. — Calcite, granular and compact. 

Elsewhere. — Gold in placers and veins ; sulphur; graphite; hematite; 

Magnetite; limonite; muscovite; kaolinite; epidote; pyrite; calcite, 

near Lincolnton (!) ; asbestus ; chalcedony ; garnet ; psilomelane ; talc; 

cuprite ; cy anite, blue and red ; galeuite ; graphite ; limonite ; menac- 

canite; actinolite. 

MACON. 

Houstonh mine, — Muscovite; corundum: talc; tremolite; chlorite; 
tourmaline. 

I/yl^s mine. — Muscovite ; biotite ; kaolinite. 

J. Moore^s. — Chromite; corundum. 

Thorn Mountain mine, — Muscovite; biotite; manganese garnet; 
albite; uranochre (!) ; zippeite(?); beryl; pyrrhotite; chalcopyrite. 



^«TO.^ %X^OY«l» 01P MTOER/LLS AND LOCALITIES. JOJ 

O'^kUageemiueor Oorundum Hill. — Gorundam (J) in beautifal varieties 
crystallized and massive, and frequently in part altered into other mia- 
erals; chromite(!); spinel (I) in crystals and granular; rutile(!), rare; 
diaspore (!), one specimen only known ; drusy quartz (!) and quartz 
crystals; chalcedony; hyalite (!); enstatite(!); tremolite; arfvedsou- 
ite (!) ; chrysolite (!) ; andesite (!) ; oligoclase ; tourmaline (!) ; talc ; 
serpentine (!) ; deweylite(!) ; cerolite; genthite(!) ; culsageeite (!); luca- 
site ; kerrite (!) ; maconite (!) j penninite (!) ; prochlorite (!) ; willcox- 
ite(!); margarite(!); anthoptiyllite ; actinolite; magnetite. 

BrysorCs mines. — Muscovite (!); lal3radorite; almandite garnet ; ortho- 
clase; albite; biotite. 

Near FranJclin. — Sphalerite; chalcopyrite; menaccanite (!) ; vrad; gar- 
net (!); epidote(!); fibrolite (!); cyanite (!); staurolite (!); kaolinite (!); 
rhodochrosite ; corundum ; pyrite; 7 miles south, chromite, chlorite ; 9 
miles south, chrysolite ; 11^ miles south, prochlorite ; 14 miles south, 
corundum and talc in chrysolite. 

Highlands. — Bismutite; beryl. 

Ea^lcetVs. — Limestone quarry; magnetite; corundum (!), in part 
altered into muscovite ; tourmaline ; calcite ; garnet ; molybdenite. 

JacoVs mine. — Corundum ; asbestus ; tremolite ; chrysolite. 

Sugartown Creek. — Chromite; tremolite; actinolite; asbestus: chrys- 
olite; garnet; biotite; orthoclase; magnetite; hematite; 8 miles 
from Franklin, prochlorite ; talc ; asbestus. 

Nantehaleh Biver. — Asbestus; talc(!); compact limestone (!); niter; 
at mouth of river, orthoclase. 

Tennessee Biver^ below Franklin. — Garnet ; staurolite ; cyanite ; mus- 
covite; columbite. 

Tibbefs mine. — Pleonaste ; zircon. 

Wesfs mine. — ^Ruby corundum with cyanite. 

Gregory Hill — Chrysolite; anthophyllite ; bronzite; foliated talc; 
prochlorite; asbestus. 

Hall mine. — Muscovite (!) ; biotite; granular quartz; orthoclase; gar- 
net; albite. 

Bocky Face. — Garnet ; muscovite ; biotite. 

JarretVs. — Steatite; chalcedony; fibrous talc. 

Potato Knob mine, — Mucovite; biotite, 

WesVs Mills. — Psilomelane. 

Fllijay Creek. — Near Higdon's: corundum ; chlorite; asbestus; chro- 
mite; magnetite; hematite; garnet; chrysolite. At Goshen, calcite, 
granular; coccolite; graphite; spessartite. 

Highlands. — Gold ; rose quartz. 

Catoogajay Creek. — Magnetite, at Sloan's. 

Elsewhere. — Graphite ; garnet ; chalcopyrite ; magnetite ; hornblende, 
23 miles below Franklin; beryl; rose quartz; magnetite; muscovite 
and biotite in numerous mica mines; gold and galenite in Cowee 
Mountains. 



104 ' THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. Ibdll.74. 

MADISON. 

Bear Creek. — ^Magnetite (!), 2 miles from moath ; green coccolite, in 
granular calcite^ chlorite; epidote; cyanite; staurolite; talc; garnet, 
(large crystals); 1 mile from month, tremolite ; hornblende; 1^ miles 
from mouth, chrysolite ; magnetite. 

Mars HilL — Monazite; zircon. 

Big Laurel. — Magnetite (!); menaccanite (!); milky quartz; pyrite; 
calcite, granular, and massive. 

Carter^s mine. — Corundum (!!) in peculiar white and pink varieties; 
spinel (!); chromite; hornstone; drusy quartz; tremolite; chrysolite (!); 
andesite(!); prochlorite(!); culsageeite; menaccanite; beryl {!). 

French Broad River. — Orthoclase; calcile, withcoccolite; limonite,in 
a heavy bed, near State line. 

Duel or Jewell HilL — Meteoric iron (!); ferrous chloride in meteorite; 
hematite. , 

Near Marshall. — Oalcite; pyrite; rutile; limonite; magnetite (!); gale- 
nite; bornite; chalcopyrite; epidote; talc; fluorite; hematite, near 
Gudger's, 9 miles below Marshall ; corundum (!), 3 miles below Marshall; 
diasporeC?); prochlorite (!); margarite; barite, at Chandler^s, 9 miles 
below Marshall; 4 miles west of Marshall, smoky quartz, in doubly 
terminated crystals; 1 mile below Marshall, agate; hornblende; 3 
miles below, augite (f); C miles below, penninite; orthoclase; 8 miles 
below, epidote; orthoclase; 9^ miles below, penninite; orthoclase; 4 
miles up Ivy Creek, hornblende. 

Walnut Creek, near French Broad River. — Green coccolite, in calcite; 
phlogopite. 

Sot Springs, — Cryptocrystalline muscovite (!); calcite; red jasper; 
pyrite; psilomelane; gold, in veins and placers; garnet. 

Shut In Creek. — Calcite ; jasper. 

Spring Creek, — Magnetite, in large bed, massive. 

Ivy River, two miles from mouth. — Smith mine: magnetite; pyroxene. 
At Eadford's, hematite and magnetite. 

Brush Creek. — Magnetite, at Freeman's and Sikes's; coccolite in cal- 
cite; barite. 

Paint Creek. — Pyrrhotite. 

Hayniemine, — Blue corundum ; rutile; margarite; green crystals of 
hornblende; magnetite; chlorite; menaccanite. 

MARTIN. 

Calcite, in marl beds. 

M'DOVnSLL. 

Cave of Tantalus. — Stalactitic calcite. 
Humpback Cave. — Stalactitic calcite. 

Cedar Cove, at Bodsonh mine. — Sphalerite ; calcite, granular and com- 
pact. 



xs«a^ , ^'tia^o^^ia OY ^n^r&EiiLS and localities. 105 

Kirksey^s mine.— Tetradymiite. ' 

Linvill€ Mountains. — Itacolnmite; radiated pyrophyllite; limonite, in 
many places; hematite; calotte, granular and compact, several places; 
meteoric iron. 

Petef^s Oove, — Stalactitic calcite; magnetite; limonite. 

Jhtrkey Cove. — Oalcite, granular and compact. 

TurJcey Oreek, — Bee Bock: epidote (!); tourmaline. 

In the gold placers. — Gold; corundum; menaccanite; rutile; chromite; 
brookite; pyrope; zircon (I); epidote; fibrolite; xenotime (!); mona- 
zite(l); diamond; anatase. 

Marion. — ^Within a few miles, limonite; manganese garnet; psilo- 
melane; calcite. 

Ba>oeoon Oave. — Stalactitic aragonite. 

Sound Knob. — Oyanite; garnet; paragonite. 

Graveyard Mountain. — Hematite; limonite; calcite. 

Head of Towfs OreeJc. — Magnetite; muscovite; kaolinite. 

Elsewhere, — Limonite; calcite; samarskite; dolomite, one-half mile 
east of Tancey's minp. 

MEOKLENBUBa. 

Beattie^s Ford. — Butile (I) in acicular crystals. 

Oapp's Sill. —Magnetite ; gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite. 

C^arlo^..— Orthoclase var. leopardite (!); at the Budisill mine, gold- 
bearing pyrite ; chalcopyrite; white siderite; 2 miles from Chariot te^ 
pyrite ; chalcopyrite ; magnetite, fine granular ; at new cemetery, epi- 
dote. 

Davidson College, — Badiated cyanite; pyrophyllite; gold; agate, 5 
miles south at D. Oaldwell's; hematite at Gibson's, 5 miles from 
Davidson OoUege; 7 miles south, fine crystals of rutile ; 12 miles south- 
west, granular hematite. 

Hopewell mwe.— Chalcopyrite ; chrysocolla ; pyrite ; gold. 

Mc(Hnn mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite ; barnhardtite ; cuprite in 
acicular crystals ; melaconite; pseudomalachite (!). 

Old Harris mine, — Hematite ; menaccanite. 

Providence. — Twelve miles south of Charlotte, chalcopyrite ; gold • 
pyrite; magnetite- 

TodWs Branch. — Gold ; diamond (!) ; zircon (I); garnet; monazite(I). 

TucJeasegee Ford, — Epidote; labradorite near Tuckasegee Ford. 

Stephen Wilson's mine, — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite ; siderite, 

Oihson mine, — Gold ; also at Jordan mine. Brown mine, Carson mine, 
Icyhour mine, Burnett mine, Neal mine, Brawley's mine. 

Boswellmine. — Gold; pyrite; also at Stearne's mine, Boger's mine, 
Stinson mine^ Crosby mine, Johnson mine. Juggernaut mine, Frazer 
mine, Taylor mine, Maxwell mine, Nolen mine, Crump mine, Bane 
mine, McGorcle mine. Hunter mine, Henderson mine, Alexander mine, 
J. i^exander's mine, Caldwell mine, Davidson and Blake mine. 



106 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CABOLIKA. (boll. 74 

Sugar Creek, — Magnetite. * 

FaMs mine. — Gold ; pyrite cbalcopyrite, 

Frederick mine. — Gold; pyrite; chaleopyrite; chryBOColla; malaohite. 

Maxwell mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chalcopyrite ; also at Clark's mine. Bay 
mine, Hipp mine, Trotter mine, Harris mine, Henderson mine, Kern 
mine, Gathey mine, G. G. Gathey's mine, Sloan mine, McLean mine, 
Charlotte mine, and Queen mine. ' 

Steele Creek. — Pyrolasite. 

Elsewhere. — Gold, in placers and veins; copper in quartz crystals; 
sulphur; magnetite, near Steele Greek Church; foliated hematite at 
Sol. Beid's; tourmaline. 

MITCHELL. 

Bailey mine. — Orthoclase; hyalite. 

Toe River Ford. — Actinolite, large crystals in talc; mascoyite. 

Bakersville, — Muscovite; chalcopyrite; pyrite; 2j miles south, pyro- 
phyllite; chromite(!); sapouite; quartz crystals; chalcedony (I); ensta- 
tite(!); tremolite; actinolite; chrysolite (I); talc; rutile, penetrating 
corundum; serpentine; deweylite: peuninite(!); magnesite; 1^ miles 
southeast, asbestus; talc; limonite; corundum; 2 miles southeast, lim- 
onite; psilomelane; 3^ miles north, apatite; at Hawk mine, oligo- 
clase(!); on Yellow Mountains, cyanite(!). 

Blalock^s. — Garnet; muscovite(!); orthoclase (!); kaolinite; columbite. 

Buchanan mmc.— Guramite; yttrogummite(f); asbestus; beryl; 
allanite(I); muscovite(!); albite(!); phosphuranylite(!); cyanite; graph- 
ite; manganese garnet; black garnet; magnetite; limonite; apatite; 
orthoclase. 

Cane Creek. — ^Menaccanite(!); actinolite; talc; asbestus; near head, 
graphite; rutile; garnet; samarskite. 

Crab Orchard. — Menaccanite (!) . 

Autrey^s. — On Brush Greek: quartz crystals, smoky; black garnet; 
kaolinite. 

Cranberry. — Magnetite(I); pyroxene; epidote; picrolite; 1 mile west, 
hematite; orthoclase. 

Blum Tree CrceA;.— Corundum crystals; hyalite. 

Iloan Mountain, — Hornblende. 

Near White Plains. — Gummite with nraninite in a mica mine. 

Deake mine. — Quartz, flattened out between muscovite; muscovite(l); 
columbite (!); gummite; albite; gahnite; monazite. 

Flat Rock. — ^Menaccanite (!) ; nraninite (!) ; gummite (!); zircon; gar- 
net; epidote ; '^zoisite, var. thulite (!) ; muscovite (!) ; pink muscovite (I); 
albite (!) ; orthoclase (!) ; uranotil (!) ; phosphuranylite (!); autnnite (I). 

Grassy Creek. — Samarskite; menaccanite; kaolinite; beryl, large 
muscovite; autunite; hyalite; columbite. 

Point Fizzle. — Albite (!); apatite (!); pyrophyllite ; actinolite; berylg 
g'arnetj wanganese gsbTueti muscovite. 



^sKsreiiL^ «YSOPSl^ OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. 10\ 

Old ]Pield»o/ Toe.— Miller's Gap: epidote; taic; chlorite. 

Unaka Mountains, — Magnetite (!); zircon (!); epidote; hematite. 

Wiseman mine. — Muscovite (!); kaolinite; hatchettolite(!); colum- 
bite(!); samarskite (!) ; altered samarskite; rogersite; epidote; garnet. 

Oillespie Oap. — Psilomelane; monazite; epidote; chalcopyrite; one-' 
half mile west, proehlorite; psilomelane. 

Burnsville. — Six, 13, and 14 miles north, labradorite in trap ; 14^ miles 
north, prochlorite ; calsageeite(?); asbestus; actinolite; tremolite. 

Pumpkin Patch Mountain.'-MdLgnetite; labradorite; garnets. 

Burlison^s. — Asbestos; actinolite; talc. 

lAcJc Ridge mine — Muscovite; albite; garnet, red and black ; biotite; 
pyrite; chalcopyrite ; hyalite. 

Cox mine. — Smoky quartz; manganese garnet; albite; autunite; 
muscovite; biotite; apatite; labradorite; pyrite; orthoclase (?). 

Eagle Mine. — Kyanite; muscovite; orthoclase; albite. 

Oibbs^s Mine. — Muscovite. 
, North Toe River. — Orthoclase; muscovite; chrysolite; talc; chryso- 
tile; asbestus; prochlorite; wad; garnet; serpentine; 2^ miles north- 
east, kaolin ; chalcedony. 

Young^s. — On South Toe Eiver; serpentine; garnet; talc; chrysolite; 
prochlorite; tremolite; pyrite. 

Elsewhere. — Galenite (!); rutilo; garnet; epidote; fergusonite; actin- 
olite (S. Blalock's) ; rock crystal ; muscovite ; kaolinite in numerous 
mica mines ; corundum, 1 mile from Stewart's. 

MONTGOMERY. 

CheeWs Creek. — Fossil wood. 

Cottonstone Mountain. — Pyrophyllite (! I) 

Crump Mine. — Gold (I) in placers. 

Christian mine. — Same as Swift Island. 

Steele mine. — Gold (!!); galenite; sphalerite; chalcopyrite; albite; 
prochlorite; caicite. 

Burnett, Mountain. — Gold in placers. 

8ici/t Island mine. — Gold (! !) in fine crystals. 

Beaver Bam mine. — Gold in placers. 

Elsewhere. — Gold in viens and placers; argentite in slates ; magnetite; 
5 miles above mouth of Uwharie Eiver, hematite; ferruginous quartz. 

MOORE. 

Carthage. — ^Twelve miles east : hematite. 

Che^kmine. — Chalcopyrite; malachite; azurite; galenite; red jasper; 
epidote; talc; caicite; argentite; pyroxene; limonite. 
Joneshoro. — ^Two miles south, on Cane Creek; malachite. 
Swanks Station. — Kaolin. 
Saw/bf A— Pyrite ; gold. 



108 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [bull. 74. 

Johnson^ mills. — Toarmaline ; acicalar horneblende in quantity. 

Soapstone Quarry. — Slaty pyrophyllite {!); pseudomalachite. 

Upper Little River. — Oyauite. 

WelcVs. — Ghrysocolla; chlorite. 
' Ulsewhere. — Gold in veins and placers; pyrite; fossil wood; at E. 
Kelly's, limonite; magnetite; enstatite; wad; at P. Martin's, agate; 
at J, Dunlap's, quartz crystals; at Johnson's mill. 

, NASH. 

Battleboro^. '^KmIiu. 

Tom Arrington mine. — Gold in placers. 

Mann mine. — Gold in placers ; psilomelane. 

Elsewhere. — Gold in placers ; meteoric stone, near Oastalia ; croco- 
ite(!); hematite; limonite; calcitej in placers; in Stony Creek town- 
ship, chalcedony. 

NEW HANOVER. 

Galcite (!), granular and crystalline ; lignite ; glauconite; limonite; 
phosphatic nodules (!) in limestone at Gastle Hayne. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

Galcite, in marl beds. 

ONSLOW. 

Oalcite and phosphatic nodules (!) in marl. 

ORANOE. 

Aaron^s Creek. — Jaspery quartz ; radiated pyrophyllite (!). 

Chapel Eill. — Hematite (!) ; limonite; epidote; near Chapel Hill, 
chalcopyrite ; pyrite; magnetite; serpentine; hematite, pseudomor- 
phous after pyrite ; 4 miles west, limonite after pyrite ; 7 miles west ; 
pyrophyllite. 

HilUboro. — Pyrit<^ in cubes ; wad ; limonite ; hematite ; pyrophyllite (!); 
chlorite in fine scales; epidote; barite(!), at Lattamine; braunite(t); 
hematite, 6 miles south; pyrite; chalcopyrite; 5 miles southeast, mag- 
netite. 

Eno River. — Serpentine ; steatite. 

University Junction. — Hornblende; hematite. 

Elsewhere. — Halite in brine ; micaceous hematite at Flat River and 
Elleby Creek ; epidote ; hematite, pseudomorphous after pyrite; ser- 
pentine ; moss agate, slaty pyrophyllite. 

PAMLICO. 

Oalcite, in marl beds. 

PASQUOTANK— (None). 



..^^^^.\ «ri^Ol?^ia or WIKERALS AND IjOCALITIES. JOff 

PENBEB. 

Galcite; glaaconite; liinonite; pliosphatic beds; at Eocky Pointy 
phosphatic nodales in limestone. 

PERQUIMANS — (None), 

PERSON. 

Mount Tirzah. — Hematite, micaceous ; menaccanite. 

Bamett Mountain. — White cyanite (!). 

JOiUdhaifs mine, — Gold ) radiated quartz. 

OiUis mine, — Ghalcocite ; pyritej covellite; micaceous hematite; 
chrysocolla ; cuprite ; malachite ; calcite ; garnet ; quartz ; epidote. 

Leasburg. — ^Tourmaline ; 3 miles north, albite (t). 

Hico. — ^Felsite; graphite. 

Eoxboro. — Epidote in granite. ^ 

Mill Creek, — Ghalcocite ; chrysocolla. 

Harrises mine. — Copper in epidote. 

Woodsdale.— Gold in vein ; pyrite. 

Elsewhere, — G-raphite, on Oane Creek; limonite; steatite ; talc; hem- 
atite; magnetite ; on W. A. Gillis's farm, chrysolite. 

PITT. 

Calcite ; glauconite ; siderite ; limonite, in beds near Tranter's Creek ; 
succinite. 

POLK. 

Sandy Plains. — At Davis's mine : gold; limonite ; pyrite. At Morris's 
mine: gold; monazite; pyrite; epidote; asbestus; tourmaline. At 
Prince mine: monazite; rutile; zircon. 

Morrill MilWs gold mine. — Euclase (?). 

Hungary River. — Gold, in placers. 

Pacolet River. — Gold, in placers. 

Tryof^ Station. — Garnet ; tourmaline. 

Tryon Mountain. — Asbestus. 

Elsewhere. — Gold in placers; monazite; xenotime; rutile; epidote; 
quartz crystals ; manganese garnet ; turgite. 

RANDOLPH. 

Near Ashboro. — Pyrophyllite. 

FranJclinsville. — ^Five to 7 miles west-northwest, leucopyrite. 
Pilot KM). — Pyrophyllite (!); gold, in placers; acicular rutile in 
quartz. 
Hoover Hill mine. — Gold; galenite; calcite. 
Kinleymine. — Gold; pyrite. 
ff ones mine. — Gold; pyrite; limonite. 



110 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. (buulT*. 

Parish mine. — Ctold^ talc; tremolite; actinolite. 
Elsewhere. — Gold ia veins and placers ; meteoric iron (!) j magnetite ; 
siderite; hematite (micaceons). 

BIOHMOND. 

Rockingham. — Eight miles southeast : kaolin. 
Hitchcock Creek. — Orthoclase (!); oligoclase. 
Hamlet. — Kaolinite. 

Elsewhere. — Pyrophyllite, in quartz schists; chlorite; on Yadkin 
Biver, 7 miles above mouth of Little Eiver, calcite and shell limestone. 

ROBESON. 

Oalcite, in marl beds; near Maxton, kaolin. 

• ROCKINGHAM. 

Madison. — Chalcopyrite at W. Lindsay's; manganese garnet. 

Leaksville. — Semi-bituminous coal. 

Meadows. — Bog iron ore. 

Smithes River. — ^T wo miles east of Morehead's factory : hematite ; gold; 
asbestus. 

Troublesome Creek. — Magnetite; hematite; limonite. 

Smith's Mountain. — ^Meteoric iron (! I) with schreibersite and ferrous 
chloride. Also on Deep Spring farm. 

Reidsville. — Muscovite; near Beidsville, halloysite; 6 miles north, 
magnetite. 

Wentworth. — Asbestus; near Wentworth, tourmaline; one*half mile 
south, pyroxene and tourmaline. 

Elsewhere. — Halite in brine ; titaniferons magnetite (!) ; garnet ; cya- 
nite; on Dan Eiver, 4 miles above Town Fork, hornblende. * 

ROWAN. 

Gold Hill. — Gold(!); bismuthinite; pyrite; chalcopyrite ; arsenopy- 
rite (!) at Honeycutt's ; magnetite. 

Salisbury. — ^Orthoclase (!) ; 7 miles south. Gold Hill road, pyrite ; chal- 
copyrite; chrysocolla; talc. 

YadJcin mine. — Gold ; pyrite. 

Dunn Mountain mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; chlorite. 

Snider mine. — Gold ; pyrite. 

Orupy mine. — Chalcopyrite ; pyrite ; chrysocolla. 

Cope mine. — Gold ; also at Haynes mine, Oady mine, Bringle mine, 
Trexler mine, Yadkin mine, Bane mine, Boseman mine, Earnhardt mine, 
Holtshauser mine, in veins and placers. 

Rhymer mine. — Gold ; pyrite ; hematite. 

Blsewliere. — Orthoclase, in large and twin crystals; gold; pyrite. 



OTs«L.\ %X«01?Eia OF lUNEHALS AND IjOCALITIES. J2I 

BXJTHEBFOBD. 

Brindletown Creek. — Diamond (I). 

Jeanstovm. — Platinum ; palladium (t) ; at Weaver^B, garnet ; epidote ; 
tourmaline; gold; manganese garnet. 

Laurel Springs. — Garnets. 

Butherfordtan. — Quartz, pseudomorphons after calcite (!)• 

Shemwell mine. — Arborescent gold (!). 

Second Broad Biver, — Head of it, gold in veins and placers ; pyrite. 

Tmtty^s mine. — Diamond (!). 

At the gold placers generally, — Oold ; corundum in grains and crystals ; 
menaccanite; rutile; chromite; brookite; rock crystal; garnet; zir- 
con (!) ; epidote ; samarskite ; fergnsonite ; xenotime (!) ; monazite ; 
wolframite (f ). 

Elsewhere. — ^Amethyst; melanterite; alunogen; fergnsonite; ana- 
tase; corundum; fibrolite; tourmaline; gold; pyrite; meteoric iron. 

SAMPSON. 

Galcite in marl beds ; lignite. 

"STANLEY. 

Heamemine. — Gold; pyrite; chalcopyrite; calcite; chlorite; serpen- 
tine. 

OroweU mine. — Gold. 

Elsewhere. — Gold in veins and placers. 

STOKES. 

BolqacVs quarry. — Galcite (!) ; phlogopite ; actinolite. 

Coffee Cap. — ^Lazulite (!) with muscovite in quartz. 

Danbury. — Magnetite (!) ; pyrolusite ; cyanite ; actinolite ; at Roger's 
ore bank, titanite; sulphur (!) m a limonite quartz geode; asbestus; 
hornblende ; pyrite in muscovite ; 7 miles east of Danbury, hornblende. 

Dan Biver. — Opalescent quartz ; anthracite and bituminous coal ; 
prochlorite; hematite; magnetite. 

Oermanton.— Fossil wood (!) ; 2 miles east, serpentine; calcite; garnet. 

Moor^s Mill. — Manganese garnet. 

Feter^s Creek. — Sulphur (!). 

Sauratown Mountain. — Itacolumite (!) ; asbestus. 

Snow Creek. — Hematite, at Martin's quarry ; chalcedony ; hornstone ; 
phlogopite; granular calcite ; agate; amethyst ; hyalite ; jasper; heoi- 
atite; albite; 6 miles east, pyrolusite. 

Stokesburg. — Rock crystal ; anthracite and bituminous coal. 

Elsewhere. — Copper; graphite; chalcopyrite; muscovite in pyrite; 
gold in pyrite; siderite; tourmaline; talc; muscovite (large plates); 
epidote; limonite; calcite, granular, on Little Yadkin and Dan Rivers. 



112 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [BULuTi. 

SUBBT. 

Dobsan. — ^Ten miles north, manganese garnet; pjrolasite; talc in 
green crystals; serpentine: steatite; actinolite; breannerite; magne- 
site; magnetite; chlorite; haasmannite(t); wad; near Dobson, magne- 
tite in prochlorite. 

Ararat River. — Four miles southeast of Moant Airy, pyrite (I); 
magnetite (!) ; garnet; white cyanite (I). 

Chestnut ilfot^nfam.— Octahedral magnetite (I). 

Fisher's Peak. — Octahedral magnetite. 

Pilot Mountain. — Talc (!). 

Tomh Greek. — Magnetite. 

Bockford. — Steatite. ' 

War Bill. — Milky quartz. 

Williams's mine. — Magnetite. 

Elkin. — Barite; galenite; pyrite; chalcopyrite ; 2 miles east, chal- 
copyrite; 10 miles north, limonite; hematite; 5 miles northeast, pyrite ; 
chalcopyrite ; chrysocoUa. 

Elsewhere. — Graphite; tourmaline; garnets; magnetite; limonite; 
chalcopyrite; sulphur; galenite; pyrrhotite; pyrite; psilomelane; 
asbestus. 

SWAIN. 

Bryson City. — Entile ; zoisite ; limonite after pyrite. 
Oconaluftee River. — Gold; galenite, argentiferous; pyrite; chalco- 
pyrite. 
A. Nicholses. — Pyrolusite; chalcocite; tourmaline. 
Quallatown. — Gold, in placers. 
Elsewhere. — Itacolumite ; magnetite ; hematite ; limonite ; talc. 

TRANSYLVANIA. 

Boyston River. — Gold, in placers ; granular calcite ; limonite. 
Davidson River. — Chalcopyrite ; pyrite ; flinty quartz. 
Mills's River. — Calcite. 

Brevard. — Chlorite; graphite; limonite after pyrite ; kaolin. 
Elsewhere. — Pyrite; chalcopyrite; rose quartz; pyrrhotite; tourma- 
line ; graphite ; near mouth of Looking-glass Creek, kaolin. 

TYRRELL— (None.) 

UNION. 

Lemmondmine. — Gold(!); electrum(!); galenite; sphalerite; pyrite; 
arsenopyrite ; pyromorphite. 
Long mine. — Gold ; galenite. 

Moore's mine. — Gold; sphalerite; pyrite; chalcopyrite; galenite. 
Pewter mine. — Electrum, 



oKHTH.] SYNOPSIS OF MINERALS AND LOCALITIES. . 113 

Phifer mine. — Oold ; silver ] galenite ; also at Lewis mine and Wash- 
ton mine. 

Stewart mine. — Gold (I); electram(I); galenite; sphalerite; pyrite; 
arsenopyrite; pyromorphite. 

Union mine. — Gold; also at Davis mine, Dalin mine, Fox Hill mine, 
Cramp mine, Gareton mine. 

Walkup'B mint. — ^Barite (!), granalar. 

Smart mine. — Gold; pyrite ;*chalcopy rite; galenite; sphalerite. 

Elsewhere. — Gold, in veins and placers. 

VANOB. 

Near Henderson. — Pyrite; cbalcopyrite; talc; calcite. 
KittrelVs. — Chalcedony. 

WAKE. 

Forestville. — Seven miles west, magnetite; menaccanite; prochlorite. 
Barton Creek. — Pyrite, large cubes ; hematite, psendomorphous after 
pyrite; toarmaline; chlorite. 

Bra^sfields. — Calcite; chalcedony. 

Witherspoon^s. — Granalar calcite. 

Wyatfs. — Limonite. 

Cary. — Pyrite; hematite; martite; salphar. 

Northwest comer of county. — Serpentine; asbestas; actinolite; stea- 
tite; cyanite. 

Soapstone Church. — Talc; asbestas; serpentine. 

Morrisville. — Granalar calcite. 

Saleigh. — Menaccanite (!); epidote; hematite; magnetite; chryso- 
lite (?); malachite in granite; mascovite; paragonite(?); nearEaleigh, 
pyrite; chalcopyrite; graphite; smoky qaartz; garnet; biotite; Smiles 
west, orthoclase; 4 miles northwest, amethyst; 4 J miles west, pyrite; 
chalcopyrite; psilomelane; 8 miles west, pyrite and limonite after 
pyrite. 

Elsewhere. — Graphite (I), at Tacker's Mill; pyrite; magnetite; ame- 
tbyst; toarmaline; calcite; at mill on Clilfton's Branch, vermicular 
quartz; in Little Biver Township, halloysite. 

WABBEN. 



t 



Middkburg. — Micaceous hematite; quartz crystals. 
\ Warrenton. — Eight miles south, limonite after pyrite; 9 miles soutb. 



Bansom^s Bridge. — Gold ; garnet. 

£bei(?ftere.— Qaartz crystals; magnetite; epidote; gold, in placers; 
garnets. 

V7ASHINGT0N. 

Oalcite, in marl beds. 
Ball. 74 8 



\\^ T^Y. TA\^liRAL.8 OF NORTH CAROLINA. Ibull.74. 

WATAUGA. 

Beech Mountain. — Fine-grained galeoite (!) ; pyrite; magnetite; hema- 
tite; at Pogie, galenite. 

Coolce^s Gap.— Arsenopy rite ; boniatite (!); magnetite (!); itacola- 
mite (!); limonite; martite. 

Cove Creek, — Magnetite ; limonite. 

Bich Mountain. — Head of Cove Creek ; chromite ; quartz crystals; ac- 
tinolite; chrysolite; epidote; penninite; tremolite. 

Beaver Dam Creek. — Magnetite. 

Elk ^no6.— Pyrite ; chalcopyrite ; pyrrhotite; epidote; limonite; 
garnet. 

Flannery mine. — Argentiferous galenite. 

Miller mine. — Pyrite; chalcopyrite; limonite; epidote; chrysolite. 

Watauga River. — Calcite ; epidote ; chlorite. 

Elk River. — Jasper; epidote; chlorite; calcite; at L. Banner's^ pro- 
chlorite; pyrite; quartz. 

Hardin mine. — Gold, in placers. 

Boone Fork, — Quartz crystals (flue), 

Near Boone. — Actinolite; cyauite. 

Elsewhere, — Gold in placers; galenite; fluorite; epidote; limonite; 
magnetite; cyauite; talc; chromite; chlorite; menaccanite; asbestus. 

WAYNE. 

Fossil wood;. lignite; pyrite; calcite, in marl beds. 

WILKES. 

Wilkeshoro. — Two miles north, serpentine; talc; garnet. 

Mulberry River. — Magnetite. 

Blue Ridge. — Three miles south, on road to Jefferson, garnet; ortho- 
clase; apatite. 

Bending Rock Mountain. — Itacolumite. 

Brushy Mountains. — Asbestus. 

Roaring River. — Magnetite. 

Elk Creek, — Galenite; cerussite. 

Flint Knob. — Galenite (argentiferous) ; pyrite. 

Elkin Creek, — Barite; limonite; galenite; cerussite. 

Honey Creek. — Rutile (!) in acicular crystals in brownish amethyst 

Stony -ffiZZ.— Chalcopyrite; muscovite. 

Trap Hill mine, — Galenite; pyrrhotite; chalcopyrite (auriferous); 
pyrite; rutile; garnet; tourmaline; magnetite. 

Reddi^s River. — Serpentine. 

Elsewhere. — Graphite; corundum (!), mostly altered into cyauite; 
pyrite; cyauite (!); mixture of muscovite, margarite, etc., resulting 
from the alteration of cyauite. 



^^^:m\ ^X^OTOlia 0¥ MTOERALS AND LOCALITIES. 125 

WILSON. 

Oontefiitnea Creek, — Orthoclase; biotite. 
Stantonsburg. — Pyrite. 
Turlcey Creek, — Amethystine quartz. 
Elsewhere. — Galcite in marl beds ; limonite. 

YADKIN. 

N^ear Yadkinville, — Gold. 

Boyden^s quarry, — Calcite, compact and granular. 
Campbell mine, — Magnetite. 

Hobson^s mine, — Magnetite; tremolite; magnetite (!) at East Bend 
and elsewbere. 
Near Forks of Yadkiii River, — Galcite. 
Jo»e»tn7fe.^ Pyrite in cubes in slate ; chalcopyrite. 

YANCEY. 

Orassy Knob {Blaek Mountains), — Cyanite ; muscovite. 

Black Mountain, — Graphite. 

Bald Mountain. — Grayish green actinolite ; magnetite. 

Burnsville, — Platinum (f) ; labradorite (I) 6 miles north of Burnsville; 
tourmaline at Parrot's Ford, 3 miles from Burnsville; tantalite(I); 4 
miles north of Burnsville, chromite and talc ; 1. mile west, kaolin ; 3^ 
miles west, margarite. 

HamptQn% Mining Creek, — Chromite (!); chalcedony; enstatite; trem- 
olite (I); actinolite; asbestus; chrysolite (!) ; orthoclase; talc (!); 
serpentine; deweylite; penninite; magnesite; epidote, in fine green 
crystals ; bronzite ; hornblende ; prochlorite (?). 

Hurricane Mountain, — Cyanite (!) ; titanite ; muscovite. 

Bald OreeA;.— Chrysolite ; talc; asbestus; serpentine; tremolite; 
chlorite; pyrite; actinolite; epidote. 

Ivy River. — Menaccanite. 

Ray^s mica mine, — Fluorite (!) ; pseudomorphous after apatite ; yttro- 
cerite(f); beryl (!); garnet; zircon; rutile; muscovite (1), also a scaly 
pink variety; opthoclase; tourmaline (!), black and yellowish green; 
kaolinite; columbite; apatite ; monazite, very rare ; autunite ; amazon 
stone ; cyanite ; albite ; smoky quartz ; quartz crystals ; actinolite ; 
talc; glassy feldspar. 

MitchelVs Peak. — Cyanite ; fibrolite ; garnet ; biotite ; tourmaline. 

South Toe River. — Uranochre (?) ; muscovite; garnet ; hyalite ; gum- 
mite; autunite; garnet. 

Proffifs, — Corundum ; muscovite ; asbestus ; garnet ; penninite (?) ; 
talc ; near Proffit's, chrysotile ; fibrous talc. 

Toung^s mine, — Enstatite; chlorite; serpentine; chrysolite; chro- 
mite; talc; asbestus; tremolite; pyrite; manganese garnet, and gar- 
net crystals; bronzite; tourmaline; muscovite. 



116 THE MINERALS OF NORTH CAROLINA. [buu^ia. 

Westall mine. — Oyanite. 

Presnell (Young^s) mine. — Muscovite; albite; apatite; aatanite. 

OihWamine. — Maacovite; albite; garnet; glassy feldspar. 

Ouggenheim^s mine. — Mdscovite ; albite ; manganese garnet ; apatite ; 
byalite; toarmaline; autunite. 

Rocky Creek. — Muscovite ; pyrite ; graphite. 

Elsewhere. — Graphite ; allanite ; cyanite ; colambite ; magnetite ; on 
Grabtree Greek, massive reddish garnet; rutile; mnscovite; in maoj 
mica mines, pyrite. 



INDEX. 



iily«l*br 81 

H 

M-51 

■l;s«aby 02,71,73 

13 

82 

8S 

«-*s 

87 

U 

81 

It ts 

. » 

7e 

a 

23 

28 

79 

M 

B. 

as 

3. de, oualjBea by 21,33.35 

22 

M-KS 

itlrt copper sssocimtcd with 

; observed by 14 

in matootlu IG 

38 

37 

■al.vsis by it 

malyaisor metwdte by 16 

C. 

« 

82-83 



ChBlcooita M 

Ctaaleopyrlto tt 

CluUTd, T. U., aiMlfuiby tt*T. 

B3,I>4,BB,«,M;IT,» 

ChwMr, A.B,, analyaiibj 88 

Chlorite «T,«8 

ChloriWW 88 

Chromlte S4 

GhrjMoolU ,, 80,81 

Cbryaallta if 

Cbrk, , uiali^by, 18 

ninrfae.P W auulfiieaby U,St,8« 

Clinsmnn, . B|>Dui mens ftiRUahsd by.,., U 

CoBUuthndte 88 

bitamiuoiu 88 

brown 88 

Colambita TJ 

Comalofl1c,'W.J.,uiBlydaby 73 

Cooke,J,P.,Jr., auilyiiiby 88 

Copper 18 

Conuulnm a-81 

CoTBlliU. 27 

Crocldollte. « 

CrocoltB 81 

Cnlugeeite C8 

Cnpreoos eoulite ■ 17 

Cuprite 28 

CuproscbMlite 80 

Cyuitfl SB-W 

D. 

Dabnay, aualyieaby 88 

Dewaylilo 83 

DiamoDd 21 

Diiuvpuie 88 

Uulomile 83 

Iluiltojitfl 88 

I}ael Hill nisteoTlte 18 

DnfrenitA 78 

X. 

EBklDS.L.a.,»ialyuaby 18,71 

EdiBODite 87 

EneUtlte 83 

EpidotB K 

£iiota« It 



Page. 

FarpniMiiiiM 7i-T5 

FernMlllcino It 

FerroQ* chlorW* S8 

Fibrolite 68 

Flamfts 28 

Frmbel, Cbu., anal] Bis bf 2S 

a. 

Gabnlte 53 

Garnot « 

GenlhlW M 

Gliuioanlte IB 

Goetbite 38 

Goslnrile 81 

Graphite M 

Gummlte 38,70 

n. 

Halite 28 

Halluy.ile M 

nunii&,G.B.,wslinowIi'dEii>eDUla 11 

HalcUcttuIilo 72 

UauemBDiille (t) SB 

HemaiUo 31 

' Uidilen.WmiamBarl.nrkDnvleaEmcnlito. II 

Meteorite dewribcd bj 18 

CiteilonrutilefroniAleiandGrCouDty. 38-^7 

Cited on qnnrti Irom Iredell Connty... *1 

Hill6br»na,W.F,,aiialj8i8by 38 

HoliDeB,J.A.,acknowlcdgmeiitBto 11 

BnmphrejB.J.T..BcknavledKiiieDti to... II 

Hunt,T.B.,analyBeBby 73,74 

Hunter, C.L'.aokDawIedsmanleto 11 

IrOD l*-20 

J. 

J»rdfln,W.n,,analy>BKl)y St 

jDliaD,FraDl[,aDalyg<.-Hby 43,68 

K. 

EooliDite 83 

Keller, H.F.,analrHi8 by 51 

Keller, H.M.,analyai6 by 58 

Keyser, P., analyslB by 25-28 

KoeDig, G. A., anBljBos by 33, J8, 53, 51, 68, 68 

Koltscliarowlte 15 

KaD2,G.F.,ackuowledgmenUta II 

Kuiu,O.F.,ineteaTlCeBdeK:ribBd by 17,20 

L. 

Labradorita M 

I.ftiaUt6 78 

Lead -. 20 

Leacopyrite -. 2B 

Lewis, Mary T.an.-ilyaiMi by 63-St,57 

Llenile 8j 

Llmonito 38 

LDcaaite 86 



U»ckiiiIoah,J.B.,iiu]ywaby II; TIB 

»■«-'» • 

Uagneslte g 

Hacsetlte a 

Ualachite g| 

Ma]let,J.W.,ai»lyaMby !],» 

UarcMlte x 

Margarite « 

Melaconita t> 

MBlanlBrilB a 

MauMCanite ti 

Ueleoritea imi 

Hiorolite , ji 

Uispickel x 

Way It 

Molybdenite » 

Moljbdile • II 

Monaaile 77-fl 

UoDtanile H 

Mnacovile , ftn 

S. 

Nagjagita : « ' 

Klter n 

O. 

OligocUs* a 

Olivenile It 

Opal 11 

Orthoclaaa IMT 

P. 

PajCe, W. F.. nativa Iron found b? U 

FaUadiomlO U 

Paragcmite M 

T,.nflfl.l,aniiljBMby a,n 

PenniniW M 

Pharmaooniderilo 1» . 

rbloRopllo 8* 

I'lmBphnranvlite * 

rinlte « 

PUUnum M 

Polycraae ''* 

Popplein, Geo, J,, analysUby * 

ProchlorilB 87. « 

ProneUio ^ 

PBBndomalaohlle " 

P.ilo,uBlane » 

Pyritfl »* 

Pi™"'™' J 

PyromorphilB ' 

Pjrophjllite * 

Pyroxene * 

Pyrrotlte ' 

q- 

Qoarti 

B. 

Rhabdtle 

Kbodvobrosite 

BichaidB, Mrs. B. U., analysla by 



INDEX. 



119 



:. B., analysis by 

<o 

)rdite 



Fagei 
58 
75 
74 
36 



S. 



3inon) 
ite ... 



28 

73 

64 

> 80 

T.E. A., analyses by 63,65 

rsite 24 

9 79 

M. H., analysis by 74 

Dtite 40 

Qe '. 82-63 

be 



ine 
e.. 



ton, J. A. D., acknowledgments to. 
ion, J. A. D., furnishes specimens 
or analysis 



lelane 



24 
82,33 
43 
60 
11 

72 
22 
62 

80 

9 85 

C. W.f analyses and determina- 

ions by 14,15,19 

83 

14 

ite(?) 45 

L., analyses and descriptions by, 16, 17, 

19, 20, 44, 45, 55, 59, 67, 72, 73, 74, 75 

brman , specimen famished by . . . . 17 

IS., analysis by 55 

21 

Ellen H., analysis by 73 



T. 



61 



Page. 

Taylor, W. J., analyses by 26-26 

Tetradymite 22 

Totrahedrite 27 

Thorite 70 

Titanite 60 

Topaz .' 59 

Tonrmaline 57-68 

Troilite 24 

Tungstateof lime 80 

Tyson, Samuel L., analysis by.... 02 



U. 



Uraninite 
Uranotil . 



V. 



W. 



X. 



Xautbitane 
Xenotime . . 



Y. 



Ytti-ocerite (?).... 
Yttrotantalite (?) 



Zippeite 
Zircon .. 



36 
70 



Yenable, F. P., analyses of meteorites by . . . 17, 18 

Yesuvianite 49 

Yivianite 78 



Wad 

Wavellite 

Wlkel, W. D., analysis of meteorite by. . . . , 
Whitfield, J. B., analysis of meteorite by . . . 

Willooxite 

Wolframite 



39 
79 
17 
17 
68 
80 



71 
76 



28 
73 



70 
49 



Zoisite 61-52 



H 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 



BULLETIN 



UNITED STATES 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 




WASHINGTON 

OOVEENMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1891 



"S' ; 



u^ 



Jill r: 



UiTITED STATES GKOLOGICAL SUBVEr 

J. W. FOWSLL. DIRECTOE 



RBCOUD 



NELSON HORATIO DARTON 




WASHINGTON 

QOTBBNHBNT PRINTING OFFICE 

1891 



/• 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Dbpabtment of the Interior, 
United States Oeologigal Survey, 

Potomac Division op Geology, 

WcLshingtorij D. 6\, June 1, 1890. 

[ Sib : I have the honor to forward herewith a Record of North 
r- American Geology for the years 1887 to 1889, inclasive, which is sub- 
f mitted for pablication as a balletin of the Survey. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

N. H. Darton, 

Assistant Oeohgist 
Hon. J. W. Powell, 

JHreaiar. 



5 



RECORD OF NORTH AMERICAN GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



Bt :Nblson Hobatio Dabton. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

Tbe literary scope of this record includes geologic publications 
printed in North America and publications on North American geology 
wherever printed. Ohronologically it includes publications issued 
daring the years 1887, 1888, and 1889. The List of Publications Exam- 
inedy page 9, indicates the range of the sources of information. 

The entries are comprised in the three following classes, all being ar- 
ranged in a single alphabetic sequence : 

I. Prineipal entries, — Consisting of full titles of separate contribu- 
tions classified by authors, with subarrangement by dates, together 
with as much of the usual bibliographic information as appears nec- 
essary in a work of this kind. The descriptive note relates only to 
tbe geologic contents of the contribution. The size of volume is given 
only when other than octavo. The extent of papers less than a page in 
length is indicated thus : ^ p., i coL, 3 lines. 

II. Titles of containing publications, — Entered as headings, under 
which authors' names and short titles of the contained papers are 
listed in their order of precedence. 

III. Subject references, — Geographic, stratigraphic, and miscellaneous 
geologic headings under which abbreviated titles of papers are classi- 
fied for cross reference to principal entries. A key to these subject 
references is given on page 8. 



KEY TO THE SUBJECT REFERENCES. 



Geographic : 
Alabama. 

Alaska, and the other States and Territories. 
Asia. 

Bermudas. 

Canada, comprising all British possessions in Korth America. 
Central America. 
Europe. 

Hawaiian Islands. 
Mexico. 
Kew Zealand. 
South America. 

Stratigraphic : 
Pleistocene. 
Tertiary. 

Cretaceous. Including Laramie and Potomac. 
Jurassic-Triassic. 
Carboniferous, including Permian. 
Devonian. 
Silurian, Upper. 
Silurian, Lower. 
Cambrian. 
Archean, comprising all pre-Cambrian formations. 

Miscellaneous: 

Geologic history. 
Geologic philosophy. 
Petrography. 

8 



LIST OP PUBLICATIONS EXAMINED. 



American Aoihdemy of Arts and Soiences, Proceedings, vol. 22 ; vol. 23, part 1. 

American Anthropologist, toIb. 1, 2. Washington. 

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Proceedings, vols. 'S6, 37. 
Salem, Mass. 

American (Geographical Society, Bulletin, vols. 19-21. New Yorlc. 

American Geologist, vols. 1-4. Minneapolis, Minn. 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, Transactions, vol. *15, p. 536 to end ; vols. 
16, 17. New York. 

American Journal of Science^ vols. 33-38. New Haven, Conn. 

American Museum of Natural History, Bulletin, vol. 2, Nos. 1-2. New York. 

American Naturalist, vols. 21, 22 ; vol. 23, January to September. Philadelphia. 

American Philosophical Society, Proceedings, vols. 24, 25, Nos. 124-130. Phila- 
delphia. 

Transactions, voL 16, new series, part 2. Philadelphia. 

Appalachia, vol. 4, No. 4 ; vol. 5. Boston. 

Arkansas (Geological Survey, Report for 1888, vols. 1-3. Little Rock. 

Boston Society of Natural History, Memoirs, vol. 4, Nos. 1-6. Boston. 

Boston Society of Natural History, Proceedings, vol. 23, p. 257, to vol. 24, p. 288. 
Boston. 

British Association for the Advancement of Science, Report of fifty-sixth, fifty- 
seventh, and fifty-eighth meetings. London. 
California Academy of Sciences, Bulletin, vol. 2, Nos. 6-8. San Francisco. 
Ciilifomia Academy of Sciences, Proceedings, 2d series, vol. 1, parts 1, 2. 
California State Mining Bureau. Seventh and Eighth Annual Reports of the State 

Mineralogist, William Irelan, jr. Sacramento. 
Canada, (Geological and Natural History Survey, Annual Report, vol.2, 1886-'88. 
MontreaL 

Canada, Royal Society, Transactions, vols. 4-6. Montreal. 

Canadian Iifstitnte, Proceedings, vol. 4, No. 2, to vol. (5, No. 2. Toronto. 

Canadian Record of Science, vol. 2, No. 5, to vol. 3, No. 6. Montreal. 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History, Journal, vol. 10 to vol. 12, No. 3. Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

Colorado State School of Mines, Field work and Analyses. Golden, Colorado, 1886. 

■ — Biennial Report, 1886; Annual Report, 1887. 

Colorado Scientific Society, Proceedings, vol. 2, parts 2, 3; vol. 3, part 1. Denver. 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, Transactions, vol. 7, part 2. New Haven. 

Cornwall, Royal Geological Society, Transactions, vol. 11, parts 2,3. Penzance. 

^^kota School of Mines, Preliminary Report upon the Geology and Mineral Re- 
aonrces of the Black Hills of Dakota. Rapid City. 

■^•venport Academy of Sciences, Proceedings, vol. 4 ; vol. 5, part, 1. Davenport, 
Iowa, 
^i^liison UniyeTslliyy Scientific Laboratories, Bulletin, vol. 2 ; vol. 3, part 1 ; vol. 4, 
j^ parts 1,2. Granville, Ohio, 
"^^•^tschen geologiflohen Gesellschaft, Zeitschrift, vol. 39 *, vol. 40,^wtU V-i. B<ne\\\jl» 



10 " RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. |buix.75. 

Edinburgh Geological Society, Transactions, vol. 5, parts 2-4. Edinburgh. 

Eiisha Mitchell Scientific Society, Journal, 1837-'89. Raleigh, North CaroSliua. 

Engineering and Mining Journal, vols. 4^-48. New York. 

Essex Institute, Bulletin, vols. 19, 20 ; vol. 21, Nos. 1^. Salem, Massachusetts. 

Forum, 1888. New York. 

Franklin Institute, Journal, vols. 123-127. Philadelphia. 

Geologists' Association, Proceedings, vol. 10; vol. 11, Nos. 1-5., liODdon. 

Geological Society, Quarterly Journal, vols. 43-45. London. 

Geological Magazine, Third decade, vols. 4-6. London. 

Geological and Scientific Bulletin, vol. 1, Nos. 2-7 and 9-12. Austin, Texas. 

Glasgow Geological Society, Transactions, vol. 8, parts 1, 2. 

Harvard College, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Bulletin, vol. 16, Nos. 1-4, vol. 
17, Nos. 1, 2, 5, 6, vol. 18, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Memoirs, vol. 16, Nos. 1-3. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Hamilton Association, Journal, vols. 2, 3. 

International Congress of Geologists, American Committee, Reports, 18S8. 

Iowa Historical Record, vols. 3, 4. Des Moines, Iowa. 

Iowa State University, Laboratories of Natural History, Bulletin, vol. 1, No. 1. Iowa 
City. 

Ireland, Royal Geological Society, Journal, vol. 17, part 2; vol. 18, part 2. Dublin. 

Johns Hopkins University, Circulars, Nos. 53-57. Baltimore. 

Kansas Academy of Science, Transactions, 1885-*86, vols. 10, 11. Topeka. 

Kansas Board of Agriculture, 5th Report Topeka. 

Kentucky Geological Survey, Reports on Jacksou purchase, Kentucky River, Round 
Gap region, and Letcher, Harlan, Leslie, Perry, Breathitt,' Spencer, Nelson, 
Garrard, Henry, Shelby, Oldham, Mason, Marion, Bath, and Fleming counties, 
and Rocks of central Kentucky. 

Lackawanna Institute of History and Science, Proceedings, vol. 1. Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Liverpool Geological Association, Transactions, vols. 7,8. Liverpool. 

Liverpool Geological Society, Proceedings, vol. 5, parts 3, 4. Liverpool. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Mineral resources of upper Cumberland Valley, 
by A. S. McCreath and E. V. d'lnvilliers. Louisville. 

Manchester Geological Society, Transactions, vol. 19 ; vol. 20, parts 1-8. Manches- 
ter. 

Maryland Academy of Sciences, Transactions, 1888, pp. 1-68. Baltimore. 

Massachusetts, Gazetteer of Hauipshire County, 1854-*87, by W. B. Gay. Syra- 
cuse, New York. 

Meriden Scientific Association, Transactions, vols. 2, 3. Meriden, Connecticut. 

Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, Geology of Minnesota, Final re- 
port, vol. 2, by N. H. Winchell and Warren Upliani. 

Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, Sixteenth and Seventeenth An- 
nual Reports. St. Paul. 

Bulletin, No. 5. 

Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences, Bulletin, vol. 3, No. 1. Minneapolis. 

National Academy of Sciences, Memoirs, vol. 3, part 2; vol. 4, part 1. Washington. 

National Geographic Magazine, vol. 1. Washington. 

Nature, 1887-'89. 

Neues Jahrbuch fiir Mineralogie, Geologic, und Palaeontologie, 1887-*89. Stuttgart. 

New Brunswick Natural History Society, Bulletins Nos. 6-8. St. John. 

New Jersey Geological Survey, Reports of State Geologist for 1886, 1887, and 1888. 
Trenton. 

New Orleans Academy of Sciences, Papers, vol. 1, No. 2. 

New York Academy of Sciences, Annals, vol. 4, Nos. 1-11. New York. 

Transactions, vols. 4-8. 



r 1- . 



DABTOs.] RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 11 

New York State Mnsenm of Katnral History, Bolletins, Kos. l-(). Albany. 

Fortieth Annual Report, for year 1^6. Albany. 

Nova Scotian Institute of Natural Science, Proceedings and Transactions, toI. 7, 
parts 1-3. Halifax. 

Ohio Geological Survey, Report, vol. 6, Economic Geology. Colombits. 

Ottawa Naturalist, vols. 1, 2 ; vol. 3, N(«. 1-3. Ottawa. 

Pennsylvania Geological Survey, Annual Report for 1886, parts 3 and 4. Harris- 
burg, 1887. 

Atlases, HH-HHH, and AA, parts 2-5. 

Peoria Scientific Association, Bulletin, vol. 1. Peoria, Illinois. 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, Jonrnal, 2d series, vol. 9, part 2. Phila- 
delphia. 

Proceedings 1887-^88; 1889, parts 1, 2. Philadelphia. 

Popular Science Monthly, 1887-»89. New York. 

Royal Geographical Society, Proceedings, vol. 11. London. 

St. Louis Academy of Sciences, Transactions, vol. 5, Nos. 1, 2. St. Louis. 

School of Mines Quarterly, vol. 8, No. 3, to vol. 11, No. 1. New York. 

Science, vols. 9-14. Now York. 

Scientific American Supplement, vols. 24-28. New York. 

Scottish Geographical Magazine, vols. 3-5. Edinburgh. 

Smithsonian Instituiion, Reports for 1885-'8(). 

Soci^t^ g^ologique de France, Bulletin, vols. 15, 16. Paris. 

Soci^t^ g^ologique dn Nord, Annales, vol. 15. Nos. 1-6. Lille. 

Staten Island Natural Science Association, Proceedings, 1887-'89. New Brighton, 
New York. 

Stockholm, Geoiogiska Foreningcn, Fork and linger, vols. 8-10; vol. 11, Nos. 1-4. 
Stockholm. 

Texas, University of, School of Geology, Circular No. 1. Austin, Texas. 

— Paleontology of the Cretaceous, part 1. 

Texas Geological and Mineralogical Survey, First Report of Progress, 1888. Austin. 

Trenton Natural History Society, Jonrnal, vol. 1. Trenton, New Jersey. 

U. S. Geological Survey, Bulletins Nos. 34-54. Washington. 

Mineral Resources, 1887. 

Monographs vols, xiii and xiv. 

Seventh Report, 1885-'86. Washington. 

U. S. National Museum, Proceedings, vols. 9-11. Washington. 

United States, Reports on the iron regions of northern Louisiana and eastern Texas. 
Washington. 

Vienna, K.-k. geologische Reichsanstalt, Verhandlnngen, 1888, Nos. 1-7. Vienna. 

Vassar Brothers' Institute, Proceedings, vol. 4. Poughkeepsie, New York. 

Washburn College Laboratory, Bulletin, vol. 2, Nos. 9, 10. Topeka, Kansas. 

Washington Philosophical Society, Bulletin, vols. 9, 10; vol. 11 to page 172. 
Washington. 

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Transactions, vol. 7. Madison 

Wyoming, Report of the Territorial Geologist for 1887. Cheyenne. 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, Publications, vol. 3. Wyoming, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Yorkshire Geological and Polytechnic Society, Transactions, vol. 9, part 2; vol. 11, 
part 1. Yorkshire. 



RECORD. 



A. 



ABBOTT, Charles C. On the antiqnit.y 
of man in the valley of the Delaware. 
Boston Soo Nat. Hivt., Proo.|ToL 23, pp. 
424-426. 1888. 

Inclndes references to the genesis and rela- 
tion of the Trenton smrels. 

ADAMS, Frank D^ Od the ooal-bear- 

ing rocks of Canada. 

British Assoc. Adr. Sci., Report of 56tb 
Meeting, 188«, pp. 639-041. 1887. 

General description of the CarVoniferons 
coal measnres of Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick, the lignites and anthracites of the 
Northwest Territory, and the bituQkinons coal 
of Yanoonver's Island. 

The anorthosite rooks of Canada. 

British Assoc. Adr. Soi., Report of 56th 
Meeting, 1886, pp. 666-667. 1887. 

Describes the mlneralogio constitaents and 
variations of the Upper Lanrentian or Norian 
series occurring in detached areas in the great 
Lanrentian region. 

[Analyses^Shell marl from Anti- 



costi and Carbonaceous schist from 
Lake of the Woods. ] 

Canada Greol. and Nat. Hist. Surrey, Report, 
1886, parti, p. 41, i p. 1887. 

— On the microscopical character of 
the ore of the Tread well mine, Alaska. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 88-03, 1889. 

Abstract Am. Natnralist, vol. 23, p. 721,6 
lines. 1889. 

Inclndes petrographio description of asso- 
ciated rock. 

— and LAVTSON, Andrew C. On 
Borne Canadian rocks containing scapo- 
lite, with a few notes on some rocks 
associated with the apatite deposits. 

Canadian Record Science, vol. 3, pp. 185- 
201,1888. 

Abstract, Am. Natnrali»:, vol. 23, pp. 109- 
170, p. (Febmary No.), 1890. 

Petrc>graphic description of apatite-bearing 
pyroxenites from Portland West, the Mc- 
Laaiiainmine, Star Hill mine, and Blessiugton 
ndne, amphibdUtes from Arnprior, and soapo- 



ADAMS, Frank D., and LAVTSON, 

Andrew C. — Continned. 

lite-boaring rocks from near Arnprior, in 
Frontenao and Addington counties, and the 
Perry Sound region. Discussion of associa- 
tions and history of some of the contained 
minerals. 

AGASSIZ, Alexander. The coral reefs 
of the Hawaiian Islands. 

Harvard Oollege, Mns. Oomp. Zool., Bull., 
vol. 17, pp. 121-170, pis. I-XII. 1889. 

Review of theories of the origin of coral 
reefs, and an account of recent observations 
on the relations of the coral formations of the 
Hawaiian Islands. 

Alabama, absence of separable Oligo- 
cene,ALDRicii. 
analyses of iron ores, Fleming. 
Birmingham region, Brainerd. Mc- 

CREATU and D'lNVILLIERi3. 
coal, ASIIBURNER. 

deposits of phosphate of lime, Pen- 
rose. 

geological snrvey, Spencer, J. W. 

North American eastern Tertiary. 
Meyer, O. 

relations of Grand Gulf series, HiL- 

GARD. 

report of sabcommittee on Cenozoic, 
Smith, E. A. 

Tertiary and Cretaceous, r68uui<5, 
McGee. 

Tertiary and Cretaceous of the Tus- 
caloosa, Tombigbee, and Alabama 
Rivers, Smith and Johnson. 

Tuscaloosa formation, McGee. 

'Tertiary, Heilprin. Meyer. 

white limestone formation, Johnson. 

Alaska, glaciatiou, Dawson, G. M. 

Muir Glacier, CmcKERiNG. Wright. 
Yukon expeditiou, Dawson, G. M. 
Tread well mine ores, Adams. Daw- 
son, G. M. 

13 



14 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



BULL. 75.) 



ALDRICH, T. H. [On the absence of 
separable Oligocene in the Gulf Ter- 
tiary region.] 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee, Reports, 1889. F-i P- 7, 8 lines. Am. 
aeologist,Tol.2,p.273. 1888. 

Statement of opinion. 

ALLEN, Joseph H. Western Kentucky 
Coals and cokes. 

Am Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., toL 
16, pp. 581-593. 1888. 

Generalized sectiOD. Discusses identity 
of some of tlie beds at different localities. 
American Anthropologist, voL 2. 

Geologic antooedents of man in the 
Potomac Valley, McGbk. 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, Proceedings, 

voL 36. 

Work of International Congress of 

Geologists, Gilbert. 
Devonian system in North America, 

Williams, H. S. 
Lower Devonian and Upper Silurian 

in well in central New York, Pros- 

SER. 

Upper Hamilton of Chenango and 
Otsego Counties, New York, Pros 

SER. 

Section of southwestern Ohio, James. 

Granite and quartzite contact, Iron- 
wood, Michigan, Winchbll, N. H. 

Lower Silurian and Cambrian in well 
near Utica, New York, Walcott. 

Fossils in Lower Taconic of Emmons, 
Walcott. 

Berea grit in northeastern Ohio, 
Gushing. 

Texas section of American Creta- 
ceous, HiLL, R. T. 

Geology of Florida, Johnson, L. C. 

Upper Eocene lacustrine formations 
of the United States, Scott. 

**Lake Cuyahoga," Claypole. 

Glacial erosion in Norway, Spencer. 

Theory of glacier motion, Spencer. 

Sand bowlders in drift of Missouri, 
Spencer. ^ 

Columbia formation, McGee. 

Genesis of the Hawaiian Islands, 
Hitchcock, 

Serpentines of southeastern Pennsyl- 
vania, Chester. 

Dynamic metamorphism of emptives 
of south shore of Lake Superior, 
Williams, G. H. 



American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, Prooeedings, 
voL 36 — Continued. 

Four great sandstones of Pennsyl- 
vania. Claypolb. 



voL 37. 



Address on International Geological 
Congress, Cook. 

Sporocarps in Ohio shale, Orton*. 

Oil and gas horizons; Mississippi Val- 
ley, Orton. 

Forest bed beneath inter-moralnic 
drift, Levbrett. 

Bock salt in Kansas, Hay. 

Oil fields of Colorado, Newberrt. 

Mesozoic of Sergipe-Alagdas Basin, 
Brannbr. 

Age of Arkansas crystallines, Bran- 
nbr. 

Peridotites of Pike County, Arkansas, 
Branner aud Brackbtt. 

Granites of Northwest, distribution 
and litbology, Hall, C. W. 

Ancient Ohio channel at Cincinnati, 
James. 

Great Lakes of North America, Spbn- 

CER. 

Lake Cheyenne, Todd. 
Terraces of the Missouri, Todd. 
Archean of the Northwest, Winch- 

ELL, A.» 

Use of fossils in determining age, 
Williams, H. S. 

Woods and lignites of Potomac for- 
mation, Knowlton. 

Glacial boundary in sontheastern 
Dakota, Wright. 

Eruptive rocks of Minnesota and in 
general, Winchbll, N. H. 

American Geographical Society, Bul- 
letin, vol. 19. 
Physical geography of Labrador, 
Packard. 



vol. 20. 



Summer cruise to northern Labra- 
dor, Packard. 
Philosophy of glacier motion, Roger. 

AMERICAN GEOLOGIST, Irving 
and Chamberlin on the Lake Supe- 
rior sandstones. 

American Geologist, voL 1, pp. 44-57. 1888. 

Heview of "Observations on the junction 
between the eastern sandstone and the Ke* 
weenaw series on Keweenaw Point, Lake 



DABTOV.] 



BECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



15 



AMERICAN QEOLOQIST— Cont'd. 

Saperior, by B. B. Irving and T. C. Cbainber- 
lin, IT. S. Geological Survey, BnlL No. 28. 

Murray's theory of the formation of 

barrier reefs and coral islands. 

Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 113-118. 1868. 
Statement of Darwin's and Hurray's theo* 
nes. 

On the chert of the Upper Coal Meas- 
ures in Montgomery Connty, Iowa. 

Am. Gkologist, voL 1, pp. 116-117. 1888. 
Disoossion of natore and origin. 

Black marl from Cheyenne Connty, 



Nebraska. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, p. 137, 3 lines. 1888. 
Notice of occarrence. 



Later Cretaceoas in Iowa. 



Am. Geologist, voL 1, p. 837, i -p. 1888. 
^Reference to a number ot localities in differ- 
ent parts of the State and in Minnesota. 

The antiqnlty of man; some inci- 



dental resalts of the discussion. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 5i-M. 1888. 
Inclades references to the remoteness and 
duration of the glacial epochs. 

— Formation of coal seams. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 3^4-338. 1888. 
Seview of W. S. Gresley and discussions of 
conditions of carbonaceous accumulation. 

— [Fossil bone in well at Lincoln, 



Nebraska.] 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, p. 439, i p. 1888. 
Gives section through drift in Dakpta sand- 
stone. 

— A new glacial theory. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 8, pp, 138-139. 1889. 
Notice of Carpenter's theory and discussion 
of cause of glacial cold and ice. 

— [Notice and review of E. Danzig 
"Ueber die eruptive Natnr gewisseu 
Gneisse sowie des Granalits im sach- 
sischen Mittelgebirge."] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 150-152. 1889. 
Points out the bearings of some of the con- 
clusions. 

— Unconformity at the falls of the 

Montmorenci. 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 333-334. 1889. 

Seproduces Emmons's illustration of the lo- 
cality and reviews the opinions of Emmons 
and others in regard to the relations. 

— Very striking examples of glacial 

action * * * on eastern flanks of 

the higher ranges of the Sierra Nevada 

Mountains. 

Am« Geologist, voL 8, pp. 340-341, f p. 1889. 
Kotioe of tome gtooial planings. 



AMERICAN GEOLOGIST— Cont'd. 

Some recent speculations on the 

origin of petroleum. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 371-376. 18«9. 

Abstract, ScL Am. Supt., vol. 29, pp. 11705- 
11766, 2 cols., 40, 1800. 

Keviewof Mendele^f. Discasses original 
sources of bituminous material and means of 
its transfer and accumulHtion as petroleum. 

American Geologist, voL 1. 

History of International Congress of 
Geologists, Frazer. 

Animikie black slates aod Ogishke 
conglomerate of Minnesota, Wincu- 
KLL, N. II. 

Unconformities of Animikie in Min- 
nesota, WiNCIIELL, A. 

Well at Washington, Iowa, Calvin. 

Irving and Chauiborliu on Lake 
Superior sandstones, Am. Geolo- 
gist. 

Ice age in North America, Wright. 

Flora of coast islands of California, 
Lk Conte. 

Range of fossils of Hamilton period 
in western Ontario, Calvin. 

Correlation of Lower Silurian, Ul- 

RICH. 

Murray's theory of formation of coral 
islands, Am. Geologist. 

Chert of upper coal measures of 
Iowa, Am. Geologist. 

Brown hematite in Allamakee 
County, Iowa, Okr. 

Crystalline rock in Pawnee County, 
Nebraska, Russell, F. W. 

Salt well at Lincoln, Nebraska, Rus- 
sell, F. W. 

Trenton limestone as an oil forma- 
tion, Orton. 

Diatomaceous earth on North Loup 
River, Nebraska, Hicks. 

Well hole on south side of Long 
Island, Bryson. 

Clay from Pine and Cherry counties, 
Nebraska, Rbkd. 

Peat bed in Loup County, Nebraska, 
Russell, F. W. 

Black marl from Cheyenne County, 
Nebraska, Am. Geologist. 

Effect of pressure of a continental 
glacier, Winch kll, A. 

River-lake system of western Michi- 
gan, WOOLBRIDGE. 

Objections to the term Taconic consid- 
ered, WiNCHELL, N. H. 



16 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 78. 



American Geologisti voL 1 — Continned. 

A great primordial quartzite, 
WlNCHKLL, N. H. 

Anthracite coal in valley of Bow 
River, Canada, Dodge. 

(Subterranean commotion near Akron, 
Ohio, Claypole. 

Diabase dikes of Rainy Lake, Law- 
son. 

Cretaceous deposits in Iowa, White, 
C.A. 

Taconic system as established by 
Emmons, Miller. 

On sceptropora, Ulrich. 

Niagara sh^es of western New York, 

RiNGUEBRUG. 

Pittsburgh coal bed and its disturb- 
ances, Wasmuth. 
Geyserite in Nebraska, Hicks. 
Archean geology of Missonii, Ha- 

WORTH. 

The reef builders, Hicks. 

Geology in our preparatory schools, 
Taylor. 

Cascade anthracite basin, Rockv 
Mouutains, Dawson, G. M. 

Later Cretaceous in Iowa, Am. Ge- 
ologist. 

Some American norytes and gabbros, 
Herrich, Clarke and Deming. 

Taconic question, Winchell, A. 

Condition of interior of the earth, 
Claypole. 

vol. 2. 

Psammichuites [etc.] of Cambrian 
of eastern Canada, Matthew. 

"Principles" of the adversaries of 
the Taconic, Marcou. 

Fossils from lower coal measnres at 
Des Moiuee, Iowa, Reyes. 

Post-glacial geology of Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, Woolbridge. 

Geology as a means of culture, 
Winchell. 

Antiquity of man, Am. Geologist. 

Huronian of Canada, Selwyn. 

Lake beaches at Ann Arbor, Spencer. 

Volcanic dust from Nebraska and 
Kansas, Hicks. 

Beaches along south side of Long 
Island, Bryson. . 

Knowledge of North American East- 
ern Tertiary, Meyer. 

Geology of the Montmorenci, Em- 
mons, E. 



American GkeologiBt; voL 2 — Continned. 
Maroon on Taconic of Georgia [etc.], 

Selwyn. 
Taconic at Boston, Hyatt. 
Pecnliarities of superficial deposits of 

northeastern Iowa, McGbb. 
Carbon iferons of western Texas, 

Cummins. 
Report of subcommittee on Archean, 

Fkazbr. 
Report of subcommittee on Lower 

Paleozoic, Winghslt^ 
Use of term Taconic, Dana. WiKcii- 

ell, A*. Selwyn. Williams, G. H. 

Emerson. Dawson, J. W. Lb 

CoNTE. Irving. Hague. Blakk. 

MacFarlanb. Emmons, S. F. 

DUTTON. 

Nomenclature of Lower Paleozoic, 
FoftD. Hall. Hitchcock. New- 
berry. 

Taconic system of Emmons, Wal- 

COTT. 

Report of subcommittee on Upper Pa- 
leozoic (Devon ic), Williams, H. S. 

Report of subcommittee on Upper 
Paleozoic (Carbonic), Stbvenson. 

Report of subcommittee on Mesozoic, 
Cook. 

Mesozoic realm. Cope. 

Report of subcommittee on Cenozoic 

(marine), Smith. 
On use of term "Oligocene," Hil- 

gard. 
On absence of Oligocene in Gulf 

region, Aldrich. 
White limestone of Gulf region, 

Johnson. 
Relations of Grand Gulf series, Hil- 

GARD. 

Oligocene in Florida, Johnson. 
Classification of Tertiary deposits, 

Heilprin. 
Inclusive of Quaternary in Tertiary, 

HiLGARD. 

Nomenclature of Tertiary, New- 
berry. Winchell, A. 

Use of term " Quaternary," Whit- 
field. 

Faunal relations of Tertiary forma- 
tions, Dall. 

Nomenclature of Cenozoic formations, 
Le Conte. 

Report of subcommittee on CenoEoic 
(interior), Cope, 



DABT0N.1 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



17 



American Geologist, voL 2— Continued. 

Report of subcommittee on Qnater- 
nary and recent, Hitchcock. 

Strootaral geology of Carboniferous 
of Pennsylvania, Wasmuth. 

The original Chazy rocks, Braixbrd 
and Sbely. 

Pockets containing clay [etc.] in Ni- 
agara at Clinton, Iowa, Fabns- 

WORTH. 

Outliers of Cretaceons in Minnesota, 
WiNCHELL, N. H. 

Formation of coal seams, Am. Geolo- 
gist. 

St. Lawrence basin and the Great 

Lakes, Spencer. 
Qoartzite between Niobrara and 

O'Neii, Nebraska, Hicks. 
Some forgotten Taconic literature, 

VOGDES. 

Geology of vicinity of Quebec City, 

Marcou. 
Position of Olenellus beds,NATHORST. 
Rejoinder to C. D. Walcott on fossils 

from Mount Stephen, Canada, 

ROMINGER. 

Haronian system of Canada, Bell. 

Well at Keokuk, Iowa, Gordon. 

H. C. Lewis and his work in glacial 

geology, Upham. 
Coal Measures of central Iowa, 

Kbtes. 

Keokuk group at Crawfordsville, In- 
diana, Beachler. 
Section at Todd's Fork, Ohio, 

FOERSTB. 

Glacial erosion in Norway, Spencer 
[review], Am. Geologist. 

Mitchell County, Texas, Broadhead. 

Literature of geyserite, Merrill, 
G.P. 

Fossil bone in wQll,Lincoln,Nebraska, 
Am. Geologist. 



Vol 3. 



History of Ozark uplift, Broadhead. 
Glacial origin of cliffy, Davis. 
Difibase with Jaspilyte of Minnesota, 

WiNCHELL, H. V. 

Mount Stephen, B. C, McConnell. 
Soils of Nebraska, Hicks. 
Green quartzite from Nebraska, Todd. 
H. S. Williams's report on Devon ic, 

Mabcou. 
An Qigust attack, Frazer. 

BoM. 75 2 



American Gkeologist, vol. 3— Continued. 

Glaciers and glacial radients Clat- 
pole. 

Waverly group in Ohio, Herrick. 

Woods and lignites of Potomac forma- 
tion, Knowlton, 

Physical theories of the earth. Reads. 

Chouteau group of Missouri, Row- 
ley. 

Well at Davenport, Iowa, Tiffany. 

Barrande and the Taconic, Marcou. 

A new glacial theory, Am. Geologist. 

Notice and review of Lehmann,AM, 
Geologist. 

Conglomerates in gneiss, Winch- 
ell, A. 

Foliation and sedimentation, Law- 
son. 

Newark system, Russell, I. C. 

Original locality of GryphaBaPitcheri. 
Marcou. 

Old channel of Niagara River, Sco- 

VELL. 

Iron ores of Peuokee-Gogebic, Van 
Hise. 

Great Lake basins of St. Lawrence, 
Drummond. 

Notes on geology of Black Hills, 
Carpenter. 

Glacial erosion, Spencer. 

Two systems confounded in the Hu- 
ron ian, Winchell, A. 

Artesian well, Woodhaven, Long 
Island, Bryson. 

Nickel-bearing rock in Kansas, Snow. 

Relations of Devonian fauoie of Iowa, 
Williams, H. S. 

Glaciatiou in British Columbia, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

Conglomerates in New £ n g 1 a n d 
gneisses, Hitchcock. 

Conglomerates in gneisses. Winch- 

ELLi, A. 

Foliation and sedimentation, Law- 
son. 

Geologic story of Colorado River, 
Texas, Hill, R. T. 

Carboniferous glaciations. White, 
CD. 

Unconformity at falls of Moutmor- 
enci, Am. Geologist. 

"Two systems confounded in the 
Huronian," Selwyn. 

Glacial action on flanks of higher 
Sierra Nevada^ Am. Geologist. 



18 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



f BULL. IS. 



American G^eologisti voL 3— Continned. 

Stillwater, Minnesota, deep well, 

Mjbadrs. 
Quaternary of Brazil, Mills. 
Story of MlBsiflsippi-Mlssouri, Clat- 

FOLE. 

Mesozoic of Colorado and New Mex> 
ico, Stevenson. 

Vol 4. 

Ore deposit at Treadwell mine, 

Alaska, Dawson, G. M., Adams. 
Iron Butte, Montana, Calvin. 
Camptonlte dikes, Washington 

County, New York, Kemp and 

Marsters. 
Crinoidea from Niagara at St. Paul, 

Indiana, Brachler. 
Obsidian cliff, Yellowstone Park, 

IDDINGS. 

Martha's Vineyard, Shaler. 

Classification of Cambrian and pre- 
l.aiubrian, Irving. 

Structure of Triassic of Connecticut 
valley, Davis. 

Geology of head of Chesapeake Bay, 
McGee. 

Distribution of loess fossils, Keyes. 

Taconic of eastern Newfoundland, 
How LEY. 

Terminal moraine near Louisville, 
Bryson. 

Deep boring at Keokuk, Gordon. 

How is the Cambrian divided T Mat- 
thew. 

The Missouri River, Broadhead. 

Mesozoic series of New Mexico, Mar- 
cou. 

Glaciation of mountains in New Eng- 
land and New York, Upham. 

Origin of certain Cretaceous lime- 
stones, Hill, R. T. 

Plants and fishes of Trias of New 
Jersey and Connecticut valley, 
Newberry. 

Tertiary and Cretaceous of Alabama, 
Smith, E. A., and Johnson, L. C. 

Rejoinder to Lawson, Winchell, A. 

Oriskany drift near Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Curtice. 

Southeastern Iowa, Gordon. 

Neozoic of southwestern Arkansas, 
Hill, R. T. 

Origin of iron ores of Kewatin in 
Minnesota, Winchell, N. H. and 



American GkeolosUt, voL 4 — Continnod.* 

Cincinnati rooks, history, Psrry. 

Methods of stratigraphy in studying 
the Huronian, Winchell, N. H. 

tf nra, Neooomian, and chalk of Arkan- 
sas, Marcou. 

Fence wall geology, Foerstb. 

Origin of petroleum. Am. Geologist. 

Chemical origin of Vermilion Lake 
iron ores, Van Hise. Winchell, 
N. H. and H. V. 

Geology of theMontmorenci, James. 

Deep well at Nampa, Idaho, Wright. 

Shells in'till near Boston, Upham. 

American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neersy voL 15. 

Copper ores of the Southwest, Wendt. 

Sierra Mojada, Mexico, Chism. 

Animikie, Duncan mine, Lake Supe- 
rior, Courtis. 

Geologic map of Europe, Eraser. 

Northern coal field of Pennsylvania, 
Hill, F. A. 

Mining on Northwestern Pacific 
coast, Bowman. 

Silver mineB,Calico, California, Lind- 
gren. 

Southern cokes and iron ores, Mc- 
Creath and d'lN villi ers. 

Ores of Chattanooga district, Flem- 
ing. 



vol. 16. 



Gold and silver mining in Utah, Hol- 

LISTER. 

Old Telegraph mine, Utah, Lavag- 
nino. 

Sulphur of southern Utah, Faur. 

Geology of Butte, Montana, Emmons, 
S.F. 

Rainbow lode, Butte, Montana, 
Blake. 

Kaiping coal mines, China, Kwong 
Yung Kwang. 

Region north of Vermilion Lake dis- 
trict, COMSTOCK. 

Chapin iron mine, Lake Superior, 
Lawson. 

Carbonate iron ores of Mississippi, 
Brainerd. 

Iron ores of Menomonee range, Ful- 
ton. 

Pyrite in bituminous coal, Brown. 

Red Mountain district, Ouray County, 
Colorado, Kedzie. 



DABTON.] 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



19 



American Instittite of Mining Engi- 
neers, voL 16 — Continaed. 
Western Kentucky coals and cokes, 

Allen. 
Topography and geology of tbe Cerro 

de Pasco, Peru, Hodges. 
Geological history of Teliowstone 

Park, Hague. 
Structural relations of ore deposits, 

Emmons, S. F. 
Western North Carolina, the Hiawas- 

see Valley, Colton. 
Aluminum ore, Georgia, Nichols. 
Petroleum and gas in New York, Asu- 

burner. 

VOL 17. 

Petite Anse saltmine, Pomeroy. 
Gilsonite from Uintah County, Utah, 

Raymond. 
Glenmore iron estate, Greenbrier 

County, West Virginia, Page. 
Iron ores of Birmingham district, 

Brainerd. 
Geology and mines of Aspen Moun- 
tain, Colorado, Heurich. 
Alabama coals in 1887, Ashburnkr. 
Gypsum in Buffalo, New York, Pohl- 

MAN. 

Hot spring formations in Bed Moun- 
tain district, Colorado, Comstock. 

Minerals of Ontario, MERRi'n\ 

Life history of Niagara, Pohlman. 

Northwestern Colorado coal region, 
Hewitt. 

Geology of Buffalo, Ashburner. 

Rosario mine at San Juancito, Hon- 
duras, Leggett. 

Copper deposits of Copper Basin, Ari- 
zona, Blake. 

Ore deposits of Black Hills, Dakota, 
Carpenter. ^ 

Bemice coal basin, Pennsylvania, 
Claghorn. 

Phosphorous in Ludington mine, 
Michigan, Browne. 

Nickel ore of Logan County, Kansas, 
Dewey. 

Ores of Tombstone district, Arizona, 

GOODALB. 

American Journal of Science, vol, 33. 
Muir glacier, Wright. 
Coal of Kio Grande region. White, 

a A. 

Lithophys83 and lamination of acid 
lavas, Iddings. 



American Journal of Science, vol 33 — 
Continaed. 
Latest volcanic ernption in Califor- 
nia, DiLLER. 
Texture of massive rocks, Becker. 
Geology of westeru Texas, Uill, R. T. 
Volcanic action, Dana, J. Ul 
Norites of Cortlaudt series, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 
Geology of northern California, Dil- 

LER. 

Tacpnic system, Walcott. 

Card to American geologists, Frazer. 

Fluviatile swamps of New England, 

SUALER. 

Origin of mountain ranges, Dana, 
J.D. 

Faults of southwestern Virginia, 

Stevenson. 
Taconic rocks and 8tratigraphy,DANA, 

J.D. 

Irish esker drift, Kinahan. 

Geology of Cross Timbers of Texas, 
Hill, R. T. 

Holocrystalline granitic structure, 
Williams, G. H. 

Interrelation of fossil faunas and 
floras. White, C. A. 

Eozoual rock, Manhattan Island, 
Gratacap. 

Terminal moraines in Maine, Stone. * 

Enlargement of hornblendes and au- 
gites, Van Hise. 

Geology of Kainy Lake region, Law- 
son. 



vol, 34. 



Geology of Michipicoten Bay, Her- 

RiCK, Tight and Jones. 
Wappiuger Valley limestones, 

Dwight. 
Lower Carboniferous of Pennsylvania 

and Virginia, Stevenson. 
Deposit of glacial drift, Hay. 
Well at St. Augustine, Florida, Ken- 

NISH. 

Serpentine of Syracuse* New York, 

Williams, G. H. 
Geology of Long Island, Dana, J. D. 
Geology of Florida, Dall. 
Fauna of "Up per Taconic," Walcott. 
Is there a Huronian group f Irving. 
Ovibo3 from loess of Iowa, McGee. 
Explorations on west coast of Florida, 

Heilprin. 



20 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL.7S. 



American Journal of Sclencei vol. 34 — 
Continued. 
Texas seotioin of Cretaceous, Hill, 

R.T. 
Animikce - Vermilion unconformity, 

WlNCHELL, A. 

Rounded bowlders along Appalach- 
ian rivers. White, I. C. 

Connecticut Lake, Emerson. 

Blue clay, Farmingham, Maine, Rob- 
inson. 

Work of International Congress of 
Geologists, Gilbert. 

Flora of coast islands of California, 
Le Conte. 

Vertebrate fossils of Honduras, 
Nason. 

Ward's flora of the Laramie. Les- 

QUEREUX. 

Archbald pot bole, Dana, J. D. 



vol. 35. 



History of changes in Mount Loa 

craters, Dana. 
Devonian system in North America, 

Wiluams, H. S. 
Fossils of Littleton, New Hampshire, 

PUMPBLLY. 

Variation in intensity of metamor- 

phism, Dana. 
Diatomaceons earth in Nebraska, 

Hicks. 
New genus of Sauropoda from Poto- 
mac formation, Marsh. 
New ammonite and position of Alpine 

Rhistic, Clark. 
Three formations of the Middle At- 
lantic slope, McGee. 
The Tacouic system of Emmons, and 

use of term Taconic, Walcott. 
Note respecting the term Agnotozoic, 

Ciiamberlin. 
Fossils of Littleton, New Hampshire, 

Dana. 
Diorite dike at Forest of Dean. New 

York, Kemp. 
Spotted rocks from Pigeon Point, 

Minnesota, Bayley. 
Terminal moraines in north Germany, 

Salisbury. 
Gabbros and diorites of Cortland t 

series, New York, Williams, G. H. 
Relations of Laramie group. White, 

C.A. 
Surface geology of southern Oregon, 

Bjddlb, 



American Journal of Science, voL 35 — 
Continued. 
Nickel ores from Oregon, Clarke, 

F.W. 
Secondary enlargement of aogite in 
peridot! te {|'om Little Deer Islet, 
Maine, Merrill, G. P. 

voL 36. 

History of the changes in the Mount 
Loa craters, Dana. 

Evidence of plants as to age of Poto- 
mac formation, Ward. 

Cambrian fossils from Monnt Ste- 
phen, Canada, Walcott. 

Origin of primary quartz in basalt, 

IDDINGS. 

Strncture of Florida, Johnson, L. C. 

Analysis of soil from Washington 
Territory, Schneider. 

Rose town extension of Cortlandt se- 
ries, Kemp. 

Contact metamorphism produced by 
Cortlandt series, Williams, G. H. 

RhaBtic plants from Honduras, New- 
berry. 

Brief history of Tacouic ideas, Dana. 

Puget group of Washington Terri- 
tory, White, C. A. 

On American report of International 
Congress of Geologists, Powell. 
— voL 37. 



Iron ores of Penokee-Gogebic series, 

Van Hise. 
Halem^un^u and its debris cone, 

Dana,J. D. 
Ascent of Mount Loa, Merritt, W. C. 
Notes on Mount Loa, Baker. 
Quartz - keratophyre f r o m Pigeon 

Point, Bayley. 
Hank site in California, Hanks. 
Geologic history of Maui and Oahu, 

Dana, J. D. 
Monozite in rocks, Derby. 
Geology of Fernando de Noronha, 

Branner. ^ 

Restoration of Brontops from the 

Miocene of America, Marsh. . 
Geology of Fernando de Noronha, 

petrography, Williams, G. H. 
Deep troughH of oceanic depressions, 

Dana, J. D. 
Ophiolite of Warren County, New 

York, Merrill, G. P. 
Peridotite of Elliott County, Ken- 
tucky, DiLLER. 



DABTOW.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



21 



American Journal of Science, vol 37^ 
Contlnned. 
Plants of Rhode Island ooal measures, 

LSSQUERBUX. 

Woodham artesian well, Long Island, 

Lewis. 
Denver Tertiary formation. Cross. ' 
North American Cretaceoas history i n 

Arkansas-Texas region, Hill, R. T. 
Phosphorus in Lnddington mine, 

Michigan, Brownb. 
Formation of siliceous sinter in ther- 
mal springs, Weed. 
Shells in till near Boston, Upham. 
Stratigraphio position of Olenellus, 

Walcott. 
Carboniferoas flora and fauna in 

Rhode Island, Packard. 
Topographic development of Trias of 

the Connecticut valley, Davis. 
Petrography of Sandwich Islands, 

Dana, E. S. 
Field studies in the Archean rocks of 

Minnesota, WiNCHEix, A. 

voL 38. 

Lencite rock in Wyoming Territory, 
Hague. 

Peridoty^s of Pike C6u nty , Arkansas, 
Branner. Braceett. 

Fishes and plants from Trias of New 
Jersey and Connecticut valley, 
Newberry. 

Early Cretaceous of the Northwest. 
Dawson, G. M. 

Porphyrite in northwestern New Jer- 
sey, Kemp. 

Lava flows and intrusives in the New- 
ark system in New Jersey, Darton. 

Explorations in Dutchess County, 
New York, Dwight. 

Carhoniferons echinodermata of Mis- 
sissippi Basin, Keyes. 

Grand Gulf formation of the Gulf 
States, Johnson. 

Paragenesls of allanite and epidote, 

HOBB& 

New locality of camptonite, Nason. 
Neozoic geology of southwestern 

Arkansas, Hill, R. T. 
Origin of normal faults. Lb Conte. 
Classification of middle Cretaceous, 

Eldridqb. 
Florida Miocene, Langdon. 
Trap ridges of the East Haven-Bran- 

ford region, Hovey. 



American Journal of Science, vol.38 — 
Continued. 
Lower Cretaceous of the Southwest, 

White, C. A. 
Relations of Uppermost Cretaceous in 
eastern and southern United 
States, Hill, R. T. 
Skull of gigantic Ceratopsidad, 
Marsh. 

American Naturalist, vol. 21. 

New Jersey Cretaceous, Whitfield. 

Taconic question restated, Hunt. 

Warping of the earth's crust, Spen- 
cer. 

Formations of Belly River, Canada, 
Cope. 

Geology of Cross Timbers, Texas, 
Hill, R.T. 

Gla6iation of Pacific coast, Wright. 

Landslide at Qrantford, Ontario, 
Spencer. , 

Age of Niagara River, Spencer. 

Taconic Limestones of Canaan, New 
York, DwiGHT. 

Hummocks and bowlders of decompo- 
sition in Missouri, Spencer. 

Mesozoic and Cenozoic realms of 
North America, Cope. 

Synopsis of the Laramie flora, Ward. 

Hill on Cretaceous of Texas, Cope. 

Instruction in geology, Williams, 
H. S., Davis. 

International Congress of Geologists, 
Cope. 

Geology of Michipicoten Bay, Her- 
RiCK, Tight and Jones. 

Notes on classification and nomencla- 
ture, Winchell, N. H. 

Glacial flow in Iowa, Webster. 

Gilbert's address oi> work of Geologic 
Congress, Frazer. 

Sand bowlders in Missouri drift, 
Spencer. 

Materials of the Appalachians, Clay- 
pole. 
vol. 22. 

Erosion in Illinois, Scovell. 

Diameter of the Silurian island 
about Cincinnati, Dennis. 

Vertebrate fauna of the Puerco epoch. 
Cope. 

Synopsis of Rosenbusch on classifica- 
tion of massive rocks, Bayley. 

Drift north of Lake Superior, Spen- 



22 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BUU..7S. 



American Naturalisti vol 22— Cont'd. 
Mountain nplifts. White, C. A. 
Geology of Johnson County, Iowa, 

Webbtkr. 
Notes on Kockford shales, Webster. 
Hoist's studies in glacial geology, 

LiNDAHL. 

Dikes of Hudson River highlands, 

Kemp. 
Fauna of Permian in Texas, White, 

C. A. 
Cretaceous floras of northwest 

Canada, Dawson, J. W. . 
Drift and loess of northern central 

basin of Iowa, Webster. 
Cascade Mountains of Oregon, Cope. 
Fossils from Rockford shales, Iowa, 

Websier. 
Surface geology of Burlington, Iowa, 

Keyes. 
Caves and cave life, Kingsley. 



vol. 23. 



Ancient glaciers of North Wales, 

Evans. 
Permian of Texas, White, C. A. 
Remarks on occurrence of Macraster 

texanus. Hill, R. T, 
Validity of new species from Texan 

Cretaceous, Hill, R. T. 
Vertebrate faun a of equ us beds, Cope. 
NeighborKood of Seville, Lockino- 

TON. 

Occurrence of Macraster texanns, 
Hill, R. T. 

Validity of species from Cretaceous 
of Texas, Hill, R. T. 

Canadian apatite rocks, Adams and 
Lawson. 

Across the Santa Barbara channel, 
Fawkes. 

Devonian of Iowa, Webster. 

lutermediate Pliocene fauna, Cope. 

Pleistocene lake of Nebraska, Todd. 

Cretaceous limestone near Clemen- 
town, New Jersey, Woolman. 

Fossil leaves from Arrochar Station, 
Staten Island, Hollick. 

Origin and history of Great Lakes of 
North America, Spencer. 

Lavas of Sandwich Islands, Dana, 
E. S. 

Bowlder of Oriskany on Staten Isl- 
and, Gratacap. 

Cretaceous near Grassmere station, 
Staten Island, Bbitton, 



Axnezioan Naturalist^ voL 23 — Cont'd. 

Methods and model in geographic 
teaching, Davis. 

Cretaceous of southwestern Mary- 
land, Bryan. 

Origin of the loess, Campbell. 

American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science. 

American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, Bulletin, voL 2. 
Fossils from Calciferons of Lake 

Champlain, Whitfield, R. P. 
Faunal resemblance of Cretaceous of 
New Jersey and Gulf regions, 
Whitfield, R»P. 

American Philosophical Society, 
Proc., Nos. 124-130. 

Geological reconnaissance in Vir- 
ginia, Stevenson. 

Surface geology of southwest Vir- 
ginia, Stevenson. 

Human footprints from Nicaragua, 
Brinton. 

Albirupean formation in Maryland, 
Uhler. Lewis. Heii^rin. 

Transactions, voL 16. 

Synopsis of vertebrate fauna of 

Puerco series. Cope. * 
Geology of Sergipe-Alag6as basin of 
Brazil, Branner. 
AMI, Henry M. On the occurrence of 
scolithus in rocks of the Chazy forma- 
tion about Ottawa, Ontario. 

Oanadian Record of Science, voL 2, pp. 304- 
306. 1887. 

Describes an anticlinal oatcrop of Chazy 
near Ottawa, and discusses eqalvalency of 
sapposeU Chazy beds at Brittania. 

The great ice age and subsequent 

formations at. Ottawa, Ontario. 

Ottawa Naturalist, voL 1, pp. 65-74, 81-88. 
1887. 

Popular discussion. Describes evidences of 
glacial action about Ottawa, the Leda clay, 
and the Saxicava sand. 

Notes on and the precise geological 

horizon of Siphonotreta scotica, Daw- 
son. 

Ottawa Naturalist, toI. 1, pp. 121-126. 1887. 
Describes the Utica formation near Ottawa. 

Notes on fossils from the Utica for- 
mation at Point-«VPic, Murray River, 
Murray Bay (Quebec), Canada. 

Canadian Record Sci., vol. 3, pp. 101-107. 
1888. 
Biiet tef erenoe to occurrence and age. 



DABTOH.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889* 



23 



AMI, Henry M. — Continaed. 
On Ufeica fosailB from Ridean, Ot- 
tawa, Ontario. 

Ottawa Naturalist, voL 1, pp. 165-109. 1A88. 
DeaoriptiofD of strata exposed in recent ex- 
cavations, and list of fossils. 

On the occurrence of '' phospbatio 



nodales" in the Chazy formation about 

Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa Natifralist, toL 2, pp. 45, 46. 18^8. 
In opposition to the view that they ate fos- 
sil shells. 

] [Geologic relations along the Ot- 
tawa below the Rideau.] 

Ottawa Natnralist, voL 2, p. 48, | p. 1888. 
faults and fossils in Trenton and Chazy 
beds. 

— [Geologic features in the vicinity of 
the Government experimental fe^rm 
near Ottawa.] 

Ottawa Naturalist, voL 2, pp. 71-'^2. 1888. 

Reference to the identifloation ot the Black 
River limestone, to the superficial deposits, 
and to the post*Tertia^ history of the region. 

— On the sequence of the geological 



formations about Ottawa, with refer- 
ence to the natural gas question. 

Ottawa Naturalist, voL 2, pp. 93-96. 1888. 

Gives table showing succession, character- 
istics, fossils, and thicknesses of the forma- 
tions. Refers to the occurrence of faults in the 
region. 

Contributions to the geology and 



paleontology of the townships of Russell 
and Cambridge^ in Russell, Ontario. 
Paleontology. 

Ottawa Naturalist, voL 2, pp. 13&-140. 1889. 

Account of relations and fossils of lower 
Silurian formations at several localities. 

See, also, 'Woodward (Henry). 

Appalachia, voL 5. 

Glaciation of mountains in New Eng- 
land and New York, Upham. 
Ascent of Camers Hump and Lincoln 
Mountain, Vermont, Upham. 

Archean, comprising all pre-Cambrian 
formations. 
AHzona, Phoenix mine, Rioketts. 
Copper basin, Blake. 
Reymert lode, Blauviblt. 
ArlcansM, west central, Comstock. 

Pike County, Brannbr. 
California, Becker. Goodtbar. Ire- 

lAN. 

ikknada, Animikie and Huronian of 
Lake Superior, MoKbllbr. 



Archean — Continued. 

Animikie at Dnncan mine, Courtis. 
Animikie in Thunder Bay region, 

Inoall. 
Animikie slates and quartzites, 

Winch KLL, N. H. 
anorthosite rocks, Adams. 
At-ta-wa pish'kataud Albany Rivers, 

Bell. 
BafiQn Land, Bell. Boaz. 
Chapin iron mine, Lake Superior, 

Larsson. • 

classification of early Cambrian and 

pre-Cambrian, Irving. 
conglomerates in gneisses, Winch- 

BLL, A.* 

correlation of Animikie and Huro- 
nian, McKeller. 

diabase dikes of Rainy Lake, Law- 
son. 

east of Lake of the WoodH, Lawson. 

elements of primary geology, Hunt. 

Eozoic and Paleozoic, Dawson, J. W. 

Eozoon Canadense, Dawson, J. W., 
Sblwyn. 

foliation and sedimentation, Law- 
son. WiNCHELL, A. 

Hurouiau equivaloucy withPobidian, 

HlCKS. 

Hudson Bay, Bell. 

Huronian at Sudbury, Attwood. 

BONNEY. 

Huronian, original, Winchell, A. 

WiNCHELL, N. IL 

Gastaldi on Italian geology, Hunt. 
Huronian system, Bell. Selwyn. 
Labrador, cruise to northern, Pack- 
ard. 

Labrador, Uragava district, Turner. 
lecture on geology. Ells. 
list of papers, Winchell, N. H. 
Lake Winnipeg to Hudson Bay, Low. 
Manitoba borings, Dawson, G. M. 
minerals of Quebec, Ells. 
Manitoba, Red River valley, Mc- 

Charles. 
Michipicoten Bay, Herrick, Tight 

and Jones. 
New Brunswick, Bailey and Mc- 

INNES. Matthew. 
northern part of Dominion of Canada, 

Dawson, G. M. Richaudson. 
Nova Scotia gold veins, Gilpin. 
Nova Scotia, Guysborougli, Antigon- 

ish, and Pictou, Fletcher. 



24 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BUU..76W 



Arohean — Continued. 

Nova Scotia, Halifax, and Colchester, 

HONEYMAN. 

Nova Scotia, Kings County, Honey- 
man. 

Ontario, Beaver mine, Brent. 

Ontario, iron and other ores, Ives. 

Ontario, minerals, Merritt. 

Ontario, rocks from, analyses, RiGGS. 

Ontario, sheet 113, Costs. 

Ottawa, sequence of formations about. 
Ami. 

Portions of eastern township of Can- 
ada, Ells. 

recent development in Archean geol- 

.ogy, Lawsqn. 
. Quebec, eastern, Selwyn. 

relations to Paleozoics in Quebec, 
Laflammb. 

rocks containing scapollte, Adams 
and Lawson. 

Rainy Lake region, Lawson. 

schist from Lake of the Woods, anal- 
ysis, Adams. 

Sudbury copper deposits, Collin?. 

unconformities of the Animikie, 

WiNCHELL, A. 

Thunder Bay silver mines. Bell. 
stratigraphy of the H uronian, Winch- 
ell, N. H. 
two systems confoimded in the Hu- 

ronian, Selwyn. 
Vancouvei-'s Island, Dawson, G. M. 
Colorado, Aspen, Brunton. Emmons. 

S. P., Lakes. Sevier. 
Corundum schist, Smith, W. B. • 
Crested Butte« Lakes. 
Boulder County, Van Diest. 
Denver region, Eldridge. 
Eagle County, Olcott. 
geology of Colorado ore deposits, 

Lakes. 
iron resources of Colo., Chauvevet. 
Leadville region, Emmons, S. F. Ihl- 

SENG. Blow. 
Onray County, Kedzie. 
ConneotUmtf Taconic region, Dana, J. 

D. Walcott. 
map of vicinity of New York city, 

Martin. 
metamorpbism near New Haven, 

Dana, J. D. 
Dakota^ Black Hills, Carpenter. 

Crosby. 
Idaho t on road to Atlanta, Thomson. 



Archean— Conti n ued. 
Maine, Eastport region, Shalbb. 
Maryland, Archean geology, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 
Baltimore gabbros, Williams, G. H. 
Baltimore region, Williams, G. H. 
mineralogy, Williams, G. H. 
rocks near Ilchester, Hobbs. 
MassachuseiU^ Bristol County, Shaler. 
geological recreation in central Mas- 
sachusetts, HONEYMAN. 
Great Barrington, Julien. 
conglomerates in gneisses, HiTcn- 

COCK. 

Essex region, Sears. 

Hampshire County, Emerson. 

limestones of eastern. Hunt. 

Nab ant. Lane. 

Taconic region, Dana, J. D. Wal- 
cott. 

Salem, Sears. 
Mexico, Baja California, Lindgrbn. 
Michigan., classification of Cambrian 
and pre-Canibrian, Irving. 

Archean of the Northwest, WiNCii- 
ell, A. 

corroLition of Animikie and Huro- 
nian, McKeller. 

gold field, Parker. 

granite and quartzite contact at Iron- 
wood, WiNCHELL, N. H. 

granites of the Northwest, Hall, 
C.W. 

great primordial quartzite. Winch- 
ell, N. H. 

Irving and Chamberlin on Lake Su- 
perior sandstones. Am. Geologist. 

is there a Huronian group f Irving. 

list of papers, Winchbll, N. H. 

metamorpbism of ernptives on south 
shore of Lake Superior, Williams, 
G.H. 

Menominee range, Fulton. 

northwestern, WiNCHELL, A. 

WiNCHELL, N. H. 

Penokee-Gogebic iron ores. Van Hisb, 
Irving, Eng. and Mining Jour- 
nal. 

report. Lake Superior division U. S. 
Geological Survey, Irving. 

recent developments in Archean ge- 
ology, Lawson. 

Taconic system. Miller. 
Minnesota, Animikie slate and quartz- 
ite, WiNCHELL, N. H. 



\>kfiR^'«\ 



^BXiCOBl) 0¥ GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



25 



Arohean— ContinaecL 

Arohean rooks of the Northwest, 

WiNCHELL, A. 

bibliography, WnrcHBLL, N. H. 

central connties of, Upham. 

classification of Cambrian and pre- 
Cambrian, Ibving. 

crystalline rocks, Winchell, N. H. 

copper mining. Hall, C. W. 

correlation of Animikie and Haro- 
nian, MoKklleb. 

diabasio schists with jaspUyte, 
Winchbll, H.V. 

foliation and sedimentation, Law- 
box, Winchell, A. 

Geological report, 1886, Winchell, 
N.H. 

granites of the Northwest, Hall, 
C.W. 

great primordial qaartzite, Winch- 
ell, N.H. 

iron regions, 1888, Winchell, H. Y . 

Irving and Chamberiin on Lake Su- 
perior sandstones. Am. Geoix>oi8T. 

is there a Hnronian gronp f Irving. 

Lndington mine, Browne. 

natural gas wells, Winchell, N. H. 

northern, Winchell, N. H. 

northeastern, Grant. Winchell, A. 
Winchell, N. H. 

northwestern, Winchell, H. Y. 

norytes and g^bbros, Hbrrick, 
Clarke and Dbming. 

origin of the Keewatin ores, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

peridotites, gabbros, diabases and 
andesites, Wadsworth. 

Pigeon Point, Bayley, W. S. 

report, Lake Superior division, 
Irving. 

Stillwater well, Meades. 

Taconic system, Miller. 

thonghtb on eruptives, Winchell, 
N.H. 

unconformities of the Animikie, 
Winchell, A. 

Yermilion Lake region, Irving, 
Winchell, N. H., Winchell, H. 
Y., Yan Hise. 
IfiMOttH, Archean geology. Ha worth. 
Montana, Butte, Emmons, S. F. 
Nebraska, well in Pawnee County, Rus- 
sell, F. W. 
Nevada, Becker. 



Arohean — Con tin ned. 
New Hampshire, conglomerates in 

gneisses, Hitchcock. 
New Jersey, artesian wells. Cook. 

Britton on Archean, Raymond. 

crystalline rocks, Britton. 

geologic surveys, Cook. 

map. Cook. Martin. 

Montville serpentine, Merrill, G. P. 

plant from limesfone of Sussex 
County, Britton. 

recent field work, Britton. 
New Mexieo, Znfii plateau, Dutton. 
New York, borings on Staten Island, 
Britton. Hollick. 

building stones. Hall. Smock. 

contact metamorphism in rocks ad- 
joining Cortlandt series, Williams, 
G. H. 

Cortlandt series, Callaway. 
Harker. Williams, G. H. 

dikes of Hudson River Highlands, 
Kemp. 

diorite dike. Forest of Dean, Kemp. 

distinctive features of New York Isl- 
and and Highland gneisses, Mar- 
tin. Britton. 

Dutchess, Putnam, and Westchester 
counties, Smock. 

Eozoonal rock on Manhattan Island, 
Gratacap. 

gabbros and diorites of the Cort- 
landt series, Williams, G. H. 

geology of Staten Island, Britton. 

Hoboken serpentine, Britton. 

kersantite at Croton, Newberry. 

Little Falls, Hall. 

map of vicinity of New York city, 
Martin. 

Mohawk Valley, Bbbchbr and Hall. 

ophiolite, Merrill, G. P. 

Rosetown extension of Cortlandt 
series, Kemp. 

well at Woodham, Long Island, 
Lewis. 

well at Woodhaven, Long Island, 
Bryson. 

serpentines of Staten Island, Brit^ 
TON. ChaAberlin. Gratacap. 
Nomenclature and classification, classic 
fication of the Cambrian and pre- 
Cambrian, Irving. 

Archean of the Northwest, Winch- 

ELL, Jk,» 



26 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULUm 



Arohean — Continned, 

classification of crystallines west of 
Lake Superior, Lawson. 

correlation of Animikie and Hnro- 
nian, McErr. 

Gastaldi on Italian ideology, Hunt. 

crystalline rocks, Hunt.- 

elements of primary geology^ Hunt. 

equivulency of Hurouian with Pe- 
bidian, Hicks. 

genetic history of crystallines, Hunt. 

geological questions, Fbazer. 

Frazer on subdivisions, Sciengb. 

Huronian system in Canada, Bell. 

relations of Canadian to European, 
Dawbon, J. W. 

report of subcommittee, Interna- 
tional Congress of Geologists, 
Fraser (el al. ). 

history of name Huronian, Dana, J. D. 

is there a Huronian group ? Irving. 

recent developments in Arohean ge- 
ology, Lawson. 

re8i>ecting the term Agnotozoic, 
Chambeklin. 

subdivisions in the Northwest, 
Winchell, A. 

two systems confounded in the Hu- 
ronian, Winchell, A. 

subdivisions, Fkazer. Hunt. Ir- 
ving. Lawson. Winchell, N. H. 

stratigraphy of the Hurouian, 
Winchell, N. H. 
North Carolina, gneiss-dnnyte contacts 
of Corundum Hill, Chatard. 

mica mining, Phillips. 

residue from decay of schists near 
Gary, analysis, RiGGS. 

Kings Mountain region, Furman. 
Van Ness. 

western, Britton. 
Oregon, western, Lang. 
Pennsylvania, four great sandstones, 
Claypole. 

materials of the Appalachians, Clay- 
pole. 

Radnor Township, Delaware County, 
Rand. 

rocks of Philadelphia and New York, 
Rand. 

serpentinesof southeastern, Chester. 
Rhode Island, Hitchcock. Provi- 
dence Franklin Society. 
South America, Sergipe-Alagods Basin, 
Brazil, Branner. 



Arohean— Continued. 

Monazite in rooks, Brazil, Derby. 
South Carolina, contact phenomena, 

Richards. 
Tennessee, Doe River gorge, Britton. 
Texas^ Harrod. Hill, B. T. Jermy. 

Streeruwitz. 
Utah, Uinta Mountain region, White, 

C.A. 
Vermont, Gamers Hump and Lincoln 
Mountain, Upham. 

conglomerates in gneisses, Hitch- 
cock. 
Virginia, Balcony Falls, Britton. 
Wisconsin, Animikie slate and quartz- 
ites, Winchell, N. H. 

Arohean of the Northwest, Winch- 
ell. A. 

classification of Cambrian and pre- 
Cambrian, Irving. 

granites of the Northwest, Hall, 
C. W. 

Irving and Chamberlin on Lake 
Superior sandstones, Am. Geolo- 
gist. 

is there a Huronian group f Irving. 

list of papers, Winchell, N. H. 

Peuokee gap, Winchell, A. 

Penokee-Gogebic iron ores, Van 
HiSE. Irving. Eng. and Mining 
Journal. 

report. Lake Superior division, U. S. 
Geological Survey, Irving. 

rocks from Penokee iron range, anal- 
yses, RiGGS. 

Taconic system. Miller. 

Wyoming, report of Territorial Geolo- 
gist, Ricketts. 
Arizona, andesite from San Francisco 
Mountain, analysis, Chatard. 

copper ores near Morenci, Hbnrich. 

copper deposits of the Copper Basin, 
Blake. 

Clifton, Globe, and Bisbee mining 
districts, Wendt. 

ores of Tombstone, Goodale. 

PhcBuix mine, Ricketts. 

primary quartz in basalts, iDDf^^GS. 

Reymert lode, Blauvelt. 

Arkansas, coal, Ash burner. Wins- 
low. 
age of crystalline rocks, Branner. 
Jura,Neocomian and chalk, Marcou. 
geology of west central, Branner. 

COMdTOCK. 



DARTOH.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



27 



A rkansaB— Continued. 

northern limit of Mesozoic, Hat, 
O.P. 

northern limit of Mesozoic in Arkan- 
sas, Hat. 

peridotite, Pike Coonty, Brannbr. 

Portland cement, Brannbr. 

relations of upper Cretaceous in the 
United States, Hill, R. T. 

Tertiaries, Hilgard. 

Trinity formation, Hill, R. T. 

zinc mining, ENa. and Mining Jour. 

Arkansas Geological Survey, Report 
fDr 1888, voL 1. 
Introdnction, Brannbr. 
Geology of western central Arkansas, 

COMSTOOK. 

voL 2. "• 

Neozoic of sonthwestem Arkansas, 
Hill, R. T. 

Mann&ctnre of Portland cement, 
Brannbr. 
vol. 3. 



Coal regions of Arkansas, Winslow. 

ASHBURNER, Charles A. Geologic 
distribution of natural gas in the 
United States. 

Euf . and Mining Jour., vol. 48, pp. 38-39, 
68-60, 7e-77. 1887. 

From Am. Inst Min. Eng., Trans., 1880, and 
described in the bibliography for 1886. 

Petroleum and natural gas in New 

York. 

Am. Inst Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
16, pp.{p0ft-050,8plate8. 1889. 

Geologic relations ; variations in thickness 
of npper Devonian in New York and Penn- 
sylvania; stratigraphlo, straotural, and lith- 
ologio conditions attending the occurrence of 
gas and oil; records of drillings in Allegany, 
Tompkins, Wayne, Ontario, Albany, and 
Greene counties, and at Buflfalo, Fredonia, 
Utica, Oswego and Onondaga ; discussion of 
identity and stratigraphlo relations of forma- 
tions pierced and horizon of oil and gas-bearing 
beds in Pennsylvania ; description of sections 
from Barclay, Pennsylvania, to Ontario, Can- 
sda, and of the CatskiU Mountain region ; 
chart showing divisions and thicknesses of 
Paleozoic members in New York, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Ohio, accompanied by a colored 
geologic map of northern Pennsylvania and 
the southern half of New York, and columnar 



ASHBX7RNER, Chas. A.— Continued, 
sections showing relative positions of the oil 
and gas sands between Allegany County, 
New York, and Washington County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

CoaL 

U. S. Geol. Surrey, Mineral Resources, 
1887, pp. 168-882. 1888. 

Includes references to thickness, position, 
and extent of coal beds in Alabama, Arkansas, 
California, Colorado, Dakota, Georgia, Illinois. 
Indiana, Indian Territory, Iowa, Kansas, Ken- 
tucky. Maryland. Micliipran, Missouri, Ne- 
braska, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, ^hode Island, Tennes- 
see, Texas, Utah, Virginia, «f ashington Terri- 
tory, West Virginia, and Wyoming Territory. 

[Natural gas in New York.] 

TT. S. OeoL Survey, Mineral Resources, 
1887, pp. 474-470. 1888. 

Abstract from Am. Mannfacturer, Natural 
gas supplement, 1888. 

The development and statistics of 



the Alabama coal fields for 1887. 

Am. Inst Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 206-226. 1889. 

Includes statements respecting thickness 
and characteristics of the coal beds at various 
localities. 

The geology of Buffalo, as related to 

natural gas explorations along the Ni- 
agara River. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
17, pp. 888-406. 1889. 

Discussion of stratigraphy of the region in 
the light of recent deep well borings. 

Asia, Syria, and Palestine, Post. 

[ATWOOD, G.]. [The Hurouian rocks 
at Sudbury, on Lake Huron. ] 

GteoL Soc, Quart. Jour., vol.44, p. 838, } p. 
1888. 

Beference to their nature and the relations 
of the diorites. 

ATWOOD, Melville. Lithology of wall 
rocks. 

Oalifomia, Eighth Report of State Mineralo- 
gist, pp. 771-784, pis. 1888. 

In greater part a discussion of occurrence 
of gold adjacent to dikes and description of 
gold deposits ; includes a description of the 
diabase dike at the Keystone mine, Amador 
County, and the diabase dike at the Eureka, 
Idalio, and Maryland mines in Nevada 
County. 



28 



RECOBD OF GEOLOGT FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BIIU..7& 



B. 



BATTiBT, E. H. S. On tbe newly dis- 
covered salt beds in Ellsworth Coan^, 
Kansas. 

KanMs Acad. Sci., Trails. , voL 11. pp. 8-10. 
1889. 

AbfltracUi, Am. Geologist; vol. 5, p. 250, 5 
lines, 1890; Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 39, 
p. 4 13, 6 lines, 1890. 

Inclndes record of 730- foot bore hole at Ells- 
worth. 

— The composition of Kansas coals. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 11, pp. 46-49. 
1889. 

Inclndes brief statement in regard to thick- 
ness, distribution, and dip of the Cherokee 
bed. 



L. W. Notes on the physi- 
ography and geology of Aroostook 
County, Maine. 

Canadian Record of Science, voL 2, p. 430, ^ 
p. 1887. 

Brief abstract of paper read at sixth meet- 
ing of the Royal Society of Canada; an- 
nonnces the probable Silurian age of some 
rocks on the Aroostook, formerly considered, 
Devonian. 

— On the Silurian system of northern 



Maine, New Brunswick, and Quebec. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., vol. 4, sec. iv, 
pp. 36-41, 40. 1887. 

Reviews former opinions, describes the rela- 
tions, and discusses age, equivalency, and ex- 
tent of the *' Silurian and Cambro-Silurian," 
as exposed in the Fish River Lake region in 
northern Maine (as described by Packard), 
and the Beccagnimic and Temisconta re- 
gions. 

— Notes on the physiography and ge- 
ology of Aroostook County, Maine. 

Canada, Roy. Soc, Trans., voL 5, sec. iv, pp. 
39-44,40. 188& 

Description of Upper Silurian beds occupy, 
ing part of area formerly mapped as Devonian. 

— On some relations between the ge- 
ology of Maine and New Brunswick. 

Canadian Record Science,. vol. 3, pp. 166, 
160. 1888. Abstract of paper read to Royal 
Society of Canada. 

Description of paper; includes reference to 
age of slates and granites which traverse 
central "Sew Brunswick and pass into Maine 
along the St. Croix River, and the Silurian 
age of certain rocks of Aroostook County. 

— and McINNES, W. Report on 
explorations in portions of the counties 
of YiotoTiBj Northumberland, and Ses- 



BAILXST, L. W., and MoINNBS, W.— 

Continued. 

tigooche, New Bmnswick, to accom- 
pany quarter-sheet map 2, NW. 

Canada, Geol. and Nat Hist. Survey, Re- 
port, 1886, part N, p. 19, map 7 in atlas. 1887. 

Abstracts, ibid,, part A, pp. 38-40; G«ol. 
Magazine, m, voL 6, pp. 135-lM, i p. 1889. 

Description of distribution, attitude, and 
characteristics and discussion of xelatioiis of 
Lower Cambrian, Silurian, Cunbro-Silnrian, 
pre-Cambrian, and granitic and volcanic for 
mations. Accompanied by a colored geologic 
map.- 

BAIN, F. On a Permian moraine in 
Prince Edward Island. 

Canadian Record of Science, vol. 2, pp. 341- 
343. 1887. 

Describes a mass of unassorted, drift-like 
material in the Permian at a locality where it 
is overlapped by the Trias. Discusses rela- 
tion of Trias and Permian, and the climatic 
conditions of the Permian period. 

BAEIER, £. P. Notes on Mount Loa. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 52-53. 
1889. 

Accounts of various features of the craters 
and lava flows. 

B ARRIS, W. H. A defense of our local 
geology. 

Davenport Acad. Sci., Proc, vol. 5, part 1, 
pp. 15-22. 1889. 

Review of A. S. Tiffany on the " Geology of 
Scott County, Iowa, and Rock Island County, 
Illinois," 1885. Paleontologic. 

BASHORE, Harvey B. The Cham- 
plain period in the Susquehanna Val- 
ley. 

Science, vol. 14, p. 340, ) col. 1889. 
Description of relations of drift at Harris- 
burg. 

BARTON, G. H. Great dike at Para- 
dise, near Newport, Rhode Island. 
See Crosby, W. O., and Barton, 
G.H. 

BAYLEY, W. S. On some peculiarly 
spotted rocks from Pigeon Point, Min- 
nesota. 

Am. Tour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 388-393. 
1888. 

Abstract, Nature, vol. 38, p. 91. 5 lines. 
1888. 

Description of occurrence and petrography 
of the spotted quartz! te and of the geologic re- 
lations of the associated rocks, and discussion 
of the nature and oi-igin of the spots. 



I>A1lTO!f.] 



BBCOBD OP GEOLOGY FOE 1887 TO 1889. 



29 



BaYIiBY, W. S.— Continued. 

— Synopsis of Rosenbnsoh's new 

scheme for the classification of massive 

rocks. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 207-217, 29&-305. 
1888. 

A quartz-keratophyre from Pigeon 



JPoint, and Irving's angite-syenites. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, yoL 37, pp. 54r-63. 
1889. 

Abstract, Nature, yoL 88, p. 810, 11 lines. 
1880. 

Mainly petrographio. Brief disoosaion of 
history, relations, and identity of the varions 
masses. Analyses. 

t IBACMLERf Charles S. Keokuk group 
at Crawfordsville, Indiana. 

Am. Geologist, toI. 2, pp. 407-412. 1888. 
Thiekness, stratigraphy, origin, disappear- 
ance eastward, fossils. 

Notice of some new and remarkable 

forms of Crinoidea from the Niagara 
limestone at St. Paul, Decatur County, 
Indiana. 

Am. Qeologist, voL 4, pp. 102-103. 1889. 
Includes reference to some of the relations 
of the beds in which they occur. 

BECHDOLT, A. F. Notes on the local 
geology of Mankato. 

Bilinnesota Acad. Sci., Bull., voL 3, parti, 
pp. 58-63. 1889. 

A preglaoial river channel and its history, 
age, origiD, relations, and characteristics of 
some clay deposits formerly thought to be 
Cretaceous. 

BBCKBR, George F. Beport • • • 
<2i vision of the Pacific. 

n. S. Csreol. Survey, Sixth Annual Report, 
l884-'85, pp. 67-70. 1885. 

Discusses the age and time of uplift of the 
Coast Bange formations, and the equivalency 
of the sncella beds. 

The Washoe rocks. 

OalifomiaAoad. Sci., Bull., vol. 2, pp. 93- 
Z20. 1886. 

Abstracts, Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33, 
:i>p. 75-76. 1887. 

American Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 639-640, 
^p. 1888. 

Described in the 1886 bibliography. 

— The texture of massive rocks. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, voL 33, pp. 50-58. 
1887. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, vol. 31. 
pp. 425-426. 1887. 

Biscosses the relation of texture in igneous 
^ks to the conditions under which they 



BECKER, George F.— Continued. 

were cooled; the development of granular 
and porphyritio structure and its difference 
from the relation of glassy to devitrifled rocks ; 
the crystallization of minerals in solidifying 
rock magma ; the differences in mode of crys: 
tallization in metamorphie and eruptive rocks ; 
the relations of granular to porphyritio struc- 
ture in the Mount Davidson diorites, and the 
influence of pressure on plasticity and fluid- 
ity. Restates his conclusions in regard to the 
disputed age and relations of the Washoe 
rooks. 

Geology of the quicksilver deposits 

of the Pacific slope. 

17. S. Oeol. Survey, Monograph, No. 13, 4P, 
xix, 486 pages, 7 plates ; atlas of 14 sheets, folio. 
Washington. 1888. 

Abstracts, Am. Geologist, vol. 5, pp. 178- 
180, 1890; Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, pp. 850-^51,, 
1890; Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 39, pp- 
68-69, 1890 ; Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 49, 
pp. 137-138. 1800. 

Description of the characteristics of the un- 
altered and the metamorphosed sediments and 
the massive rocks and synopsis and discussion 
of the stratigraphy, general geologic rela- 
tions, taxonomy and geologic history of Cali- 
fornia formations, especially in the Coast 
Bangos; detailed descriptions and discussions 
of the relations in each of the principal quick- 
silver districts in California and at Steamboat 
Springs, Nevada, and references to various 
other American and foreign localities. Dis- 
cussion of history, date, results, and condi- 
tions affecting metamorphism in the region ; 
origin of serpentines, the nodules in the sand- 
stones, and the massive rocks; relations of 
thevolcanics in general and in the several 
districts ; ihe geologic relations, associations, 
and genesis of the ores, and the nature and 
nomenclature of ore veins, and the genesis of 
ores in general. Accompanied by colored 
geologic maps. 

Report, California division of ge- 
ology. 

IT. S. Geol. Survey, Seventh Beport, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 93-97. 1888. 

References to the diabase pebbles in the 
conglomerate and the relative ages of the 
andesites at Steamboat Springs, Nevada; 
the occurrence of a dike of rhyolite at New 
Almaden and Guadaloope ; reexamination of 
Washoe diabase, andesites, and quartz* por- 
phyry; the relations of the early and the 
late Cretaceous of the Coast Kanges, the v^ 
identity of the older strata of the Coast > 
Kanges with the fossil iferous rocks at the 
southern end of the gold belt in the Sierra 
Nevada, and the age and history of the Chico 
and T6jon series ; the Cretaceous metamor- 
phics ; the shai>e of volcanic cones ; mechan- 
ical conditions of faulting, and the age and 



30 



RECORD OP GEOLOOr FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.75W 



BECKBR, George F.-— Coatinned. 

contemporaneity of the lava on the west side 
of Clear Lake with that of Honnt Shasta. 

BEECHBR, Charles E. A spiral bivalve 
shell from the Waverly groap of Penn- 
sylvania. 

New York, Thirty-ninth Report State Ma- 
seam of Nat. Hist., 1885, pp. 161-188, plate. 
1886. 

Describes the Waverly rooks of northwest- 
em Pennsylvania, where they are greatly at- 
tenuated and present evidence of near shore 
deposition. 

[ and HALL, C. £. f ]. Field notes 

on the geology of the Mohawk Valley. 

New York, Fifth Report of the State Geolo- 
gist, 1885, pp. 8-10, map. 1887. 

Describes a series of faults and the rela- 
tions of the crystalline to the overlying rocks. 
Accompanied by a folded, partly colored 
geologic map. 

[ HALL, J. W. and HALL, C. E.?J. 

Note on the Oneonta sandstone in the 
vicinity of Oxford, Chenango County, 
New York. 

New York, Fifth Report of the State Gteolo- 
gist, 1885, p. 11. 1887. 

Describe occarrenco of fossils and discuss 
the horizon of the sandstones. 

BELL, Robert. Marhle Island and the 
northwest coast of Hudson's Bay. 

Canadian last., Proc, 3d series, vol. 4, pp. 
192-204, 2 plates. 1887. 

Abstract. Scottish Geog. Mag., voL 3, p. 
321, i p. 1887. 

Describes supposed Haronianquartzite, gla- 
ciation, and ancient beaches on the island and 
in its vicinity, and a series of rock specimens, 
supposed to be Huronian, from the coast of 
the bay. Discusdcs the direction of glacial 
flow in the Hudson's Bay region. 

On some points in reference to ice 

phenomena. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., vol. 4, section 
ni, pp. 85-91. 40. 1887. 

Discusses the transportation of d6bris by 
icebergs, field ice, and anc hor ice ; the forma- 
tion of bowlder rings around ponds, and the 
occurrence of dikes of bowlders and shingle 
on the shores of islands and points. 

Rock specimens from Cumherland 



Sound, Baffin Land. 

Science, vol. 10, p. 287. 1887. 

Gneisses, limestone, graphite, and quartz, 
which are considered representatives of Lan- 
rentian, similar to that on the north side of 
Hudson Strait and the lower Ottawa Yalley. 

— The silver mines of Thunder Bay, 
Lake Superior. 



BELL, Robert— CoDtinaed. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 43, pp. 23, 42. 
1887. 
Statement of geologic relations. 

The Huronian system of Canada. 

Am. aeotogist, vol. 2, p. 881. i p. 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to Royal Society of 
Canada. 1888. 

Discussion of the indivisibility of the Hu- 
ronian. 

Report on an exploration of portions 

of the At-ta-wa*pish-kat and Albany 
Rivers, Lonely Lake to James' Bay. 

Canada, Oeol. and Nat Hist Sorvey, Re- 
port 1886, part O, p. 38. plates. 1887. 

Abstracts, ibid,^ part A, pp. 22-26. Geol. 
Magazine, ui, voL 8, p. 134, i p. 1888. 

Includes references to distribution, charac- 
ters, and relations of crystalline rocks ; fos- 
siliferous Devonian, Silurian, and drifts; 
list of directions of glacial stri» ; brief dis- 
cussion of extent of Paleosoic rocks, the 
absence of Carboniferous, and the source of 
the drift. 

The petroleum field of Ontario. 

Canada, Roy. Soc., Trans , voL 5, section 
IV. pp. 101-113, 40. 1888. 

Discussion of the conditions affecting the 
occurrence of petroleum, the extension of the 
Cincinnati anticlinal in Canada and its his. 
tory, and the structure of the Ontario region. 

The origin of some geographical 

features in Canada. 

Canadian Record Sci., voL 8, pp. 163-165. 
1888. 

Abstract, Popnlar Science Monthly, vol. 35, 
pp. 422,423,1 p. 1889. 

Reviewed by A. T. Drummond, Canadian 
Record of Scienoe, voL 3, pp. 142-147. 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to Royal Society of 
Canada. 

Discussion of the origin of the lake basins, 
large and small, and of certain river channels. 

Presidential address : The Huronian 

system in Canada. 

Canada, Royal Soo., Trans., vol. 6, section 
IV, pp. 3-13. 1889. 

A general discussion of the characteristics, 
relations, stratigraphy, distribution, and clas- 
sification of the Huronian. 

On the Archean. See FRAZER. 

Report on Archean. 

Bermudas, origin of present form, 
Fewkes. Heilprin. 

BIDDLE, H. J. Notes on the surface 
geology of southern Oregon. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 88, pp. 475-483. 
1888. 



DARTON.J 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



31 



BIDDLE, H. J.~Continaed. 

Inclades descriptions of ancient lake beaches 
and deposits, indadjng a volcanic^ ash bed, 
and discnssion of the Qoatemary history of 
the lakes of the rejj^on. 

BISHOP, Irving P. Salt wells of west- 
em New York. 

New York, Fif^ Beport of the State Gkolo- 
gist, 1885, pp. 12-47. 1887. 

Gives a series of well records ; discusses the 
extent, horizon, and origin of the salt deposits. 

BLAKE, William P. Iron ore deposits 
of soathem Utah. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
U, pp. S09L-811. 1886. 

Brief reference to nature of associated 
formations. 

The rainbow lode, Batte City, Mon- 
tana. 

Am. Inst Mining Engineers, Trans., yoI. 
16,pp.6&-80. 1887. 

Describes the granite and its constitueuts, 
the trachyte or porphyry outburst of the 
"Butte," and the character, course, faults, 
Tariations. and minerals of the lode ; discusses 
vein formation and rock decomposition. 

[ ] [On the use of* the term "Ta- 

conic."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Beport, 1888, B, p. 17, 2 lines. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Suggestion in regard to its application. 

■ — The copper deposits of the Copper 
Basin, Arizona, and their origin. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 479-485. 1889. 

Includes a brief description of the geoloj:io 
relations. ^ 

On the Archean. See FRAZER, 

Report on Archean. 

BLAUVELT, Harrington. The Rey- 
' mert manganiferous lode, Arizona, and 
its formations. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 47, pp. 139-140. 
1889. 

Prefaced by a brief description of geologic 
relations. 

BOAS, Franz. The geography and ge- 
ology of Baffin Land. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., vol. 5, section 
IV, pp. 75-78, 4°. 1888. 

Brief reference to geologic formations and 
evidences of glaciation. 

BOLTON, H. C. Notes on the great 
salt deposits of Petite Anse, Louisiana. 
[Abstract.] 



BOLTON, H. C.—Continned. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 7. pp. 122- 
127. 1888. 

Sci. AuL Snpt., vol. 26, pp. 10475, 10476, No. 
656. 1888. 

Brief description of deposit and workings ; 
anotes analyses and Uilganl and Goessmaon 
on the age and origin, and discusses relations 
of underlying saodstones and lignites. 

BONNET, T. G. Notes on a part of 
the Huronian series in the neighborhood 
of Sndbnry (Canada). 

Gkol. Soc., Quart. Jour., vol. 44, pp. 32-44. 
1888. 

Beview by Alexander Wiuchell, Am. Oeolo- 
fist, voL 3, pp. 212-214. 1889. 

Petrograpliic description, mainly, and dis- 
cussion of their nature, origin, history, age, 
and relations to the Laurentian. Befereuce 
to some structural relations. 

See also SPENCER, James. 

Boston Society of Natural History, 
Memoirs, voL 4. 
Taconic of Georgia and report on 
geology of Vermont, Marcou. 

Proceedings, vol. 23. 

Origin of divisions between layers of 
stratified rocks, Siialer. 

Antiquity of man in valley of the Del- 
aware, Abbott. 

Age of Ohio gravel beds, Wright. 

Recession of ice sheet in Minnesota, 
Upham. 

Geology of outer islands of Boston 
Harbor, Crosby. 

Geology of the Black Hills of Dakota, 
Crosby. 

Origin of present form of the Bermu- 
das, Fewkes. 

Dikes at Paradise, Crosby and Bar- 
ton. 

Origin of Trias monocliuals, Davis, 
W.H. 

Use of name Taconic, Marcou. 

vol. 24. 



Evolution of faunas of the Lower 

Lias, Hyatt. 
Date of report on geology of Vermont, 

Hitchcock, Marcou. 
Geology of Nahant, Lane. 
Marine shells in till near Boston, 

TJPIIAM. 

Early man in Delaware Valley, Cres- 

son. 
Chipped Implement in drift, Jackson 

County, Indiana, Cresson. 



32 



BECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BDUUlfti 



Boston Society of Natural History, 
Prooeedings, voL 24 — Continued. 
Age of Philadelphia red gravel, 

Wright. 
Canadian geologic olaasification for 

Quebec, M arcou. 
Pot holes at Cohasset, Bouvi^, Upham. 
Strnotare of dramlioH, Upham. 
Horizon of limestone at Nahant, 

FOBRSTB. 

Clinton fossils from Indiana, Tennes- 
see, and Georgia, Fobrstb. 

BOnVE, T. T. Indian pot holes or 
giants' kettles of foreign writers. 

Boston Soo. Nat. Hi«t., Proc., voL 24, pp. 
218-228. 1889. 

Description and figures of pot holes on the 
coast at Gohasset and disonssion of their 
origin. 

BOWERS, Stephen. Ventura County. 

Oalifornia, Eighth Report of State BSiner- 
alogist.pp. 679-690. 1888. 

Inolades references to geologic relations 
and history, age of formations, fossils, and 
stmcture at various points. 

BOWMAN, Amos. Mining develop- 
ments on the northwestern Pacific coast 
and their wider bearing. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 707-717. 1887. 

Some references to the coal-bearing forma- 
tions. Briefly describes the geologic relations 
of the auriferons slates, series of the Caribou 
region, and discusses their age, origin, and 
mode of impregnation with gold. Considers 
* the origin of some placer deposits and drain- 
age features. 

[Preliminary report on the Caribou 

gold-bearing district, British Colum- 
bia.] 

Canada, Gkol. and Nat. Hist Surrey, Re- 
port, 1886, part A, pp. 5-7. 1887. 

Includes announcement of the discovery of 
Paleozoic fossils in the auriferous schists and 
reference to their equivalency. 

Testimony of Ottawa clays and 

gravels to the expansion of the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence and Cauadian lakes 
within the human period. 

Ottawa Naturalist, vol 1, pp. 149-161. 1888. 
Description of the sni>erflcial deposits and 
terraces. 

3RACKETT, Richard N. A micro- 
scopic study of the peridotlte of Pike 
County, Arkansas. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vo\. 38, pp. 56-59. 
1889. 



BRACKBTT, Biohard N.— Continned. 

Abatractk Am. Naturalist, vol 33, p. TU, i p. 
1889. 

Peirogiaphio deaoriptiOB of the serenl 
rooks firom the locality. 

See, also, BRANNBR, John C. and. 

BRAINERD, AlAred F. A new dis- 
covery of carbonate iron ores at Enter- 
prise, Mississippi. 

Am. Inst. Mining Enginaara, Trana., toL 

16, pp. 144^149. 1887. *■ 
Beferenoe to mode of ocoorrenoe, thickneaa, 

etc Analyses. 

Notes on the iron ores, fuel, and im- 
proved blast-fnmaoe practice of the 
Birmingham district. 

Am. Inst Mininf Engineers, Trans., voL 

17, pp. 151-166. 1889. 

Includes analyses of limestones and Clinton 
iron<Mres. 

BRAINERD, Ezra and SEBL7, H. M. 

The original Chazy rocks. 

Am. Qeologist . voL 2, pp. 323-380. 1888. 

Detailed description of stratigraphy and 
structure in Chazy, New York, accompanied 
by map and cross sections. Discussion of 
possibility of fault separating theChasy from 
l^e Potsdam and cutting off the Ci^iferons 
beds. 

BRANNER, John C. Annual Beport of 
the Geological Survey of Arkansas for 
1887, pp. 15, 8^. Little Rook, 1887. 

Administrative report. 

Glaciation: its relations to the 

Lackawanna- Wyoming region. 

Lackawanna Inst Hist, and Soiance, Pabs., 
vol. 1, pp. a-18, 4 plates. 1887. 

Sketch of the glacial history of the region, 
and discussion of glacial theories, origin of 
drifts, causes of glacial cold, etc. 

Notes upon the glacial stri» ob- 



served in the Wyoming-Lackawanna 
region. 

Lackawanna Inst Hist and Science, Pabs., 
vol. 1, pp. 19-27. 1887. 

List of stri», in some instsnoes with sug- 
gestions in regard to the signiflcaace of their 
direction. 

— Introduction to the report apon 
western central Arkansas. 

Arkani|as, Greol. Survey, Report for 1888, 
voL 1, pp. xxix-xxxi. 1888. 

Incidentally discusses the extent and rela- 
tions of the axes of the flexures. 

— On the manufacture of Portland 
cement. 

Arkansas, Geol. Survey, Beport for 1888| 
vol 2, pp. 291-302. 1888, 



DABTOK.] 



-RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



33 



John C. — Coutinuod. 
Inolndes tables of analyses of Arkansas 
chalks and clays. 

The Geology of Fernando de No- 



ronba, part I. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 145-161, 
pl.T. 1889. 

Topography, distribation, structure, and 
relations of the several volcanic rocks and 
account of calcareous sandstones at various 
points along the coast. 

The age and correlation of the Mes- 

ozoio rocks of the Sergipe-Alagdas ba- 
sin of Brazil. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., vol. 37, pp. 
187-188,1 p. 1880. 

Faleontologic characteristics of the several 
Bones of the series and age of acUoining forma* 
tions. 

The age of the crystalline rocks of 

Arkansas. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., vol. 37, p. 
188, i p. 1889. 
Evidence of their intrusive nature and age. 

The peridotite of Pike County, Ar- 
kansas. 

Am. Jour. Sci., Sd series, vol. 38, pp. 50-56, 
plate. 1889. 

Local geology, illustrated by colored map ; 
relations and date of intrusion of peridotite 
and sketch of gbologic history of the region. 

and BRACKETT, R. N. The peri- 

dotites of Pike Connty, Arkansas. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., vol. 37, pp. 
188-189, ip. 1889. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, vol. 36, 
p. 431, i col. 

Announcement of their occurrence, general 
relations, and i»etrographic characteristics. 

BRBNT, Charles. The Beaver mine, 
Ontario, Canada. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 45, p. 123, | 
col., 4°. 1888. 

Reference to geologic relations of Animikie 
slates and traps. 

BRINTON, D. G. On an ancient human 
footprint from Nicaragua. 

AnLPhiL Soo.-, Proc., voL 24, pp. 437-444, pi. 

iro.l»l. 1888. 

Includes a desoription by Dr. Earl Flint of 
the geologio relations of the region and de- 
poait in which the Ibotprint was found. 

British Assoc. Adv. Soienoe, Report of 
Fifty-sixth Meeting. 
Anorthosite rocks of Canada, Adams. 
Canadian Rocky Mountains, Daw- 
son, G. M. 
C^-bearing rocks of Canada, Adams. 

Bull. 76 3 



British Assoc. Adv. Science, Report of 
Fifty-sizth Meeting — Continued. 
Glaciati on of North Americai Great 

Bsitain, and Ireland, Lewis. 
Relations of geology of Arctic and 
Atlantic basins. Dawson, J. W. 

Report of Fifty-seventh Meet- 
ing. 
Extra-morainal lakes in England, 
North America, and elsewhere, 
Lewis, H. C. 
Places of interest on banks o^ Sas- 
katchewan, Panton. 

Report of Fifty-eighth Meeting. 

Bowlder in Halifax coal, SrENCEU 
and BoNNEY. 

BRITTON, N. L. Report for 1886. 

•Oeol. Surrey of New Jersey, Report of the 
Qeologist for 1886, pp. 74-112, 2 plates. 1887. 

Review, Science, voL 9, pp. 595-596. 1887. 

Preseuts additional information in regard 
to the stratigraphy, structuxal features, suo- 
cession, and distribution of the three groups 
of the highland Archean, which appears to 
constitute one conformable system represent- 
ing the Laurentian of Canada ; dicusses the 
equivalency of the groups to similar forma- 
tion elsewhere, and the relations of the West- 
Chester County — New York Island — Trenton 
belt; describes the occurrence, relations, and 
lithology of a collection, includiog granites, 
quartz-syenit«s, diorites, diabases, kersan- 
tites, and porphyrites. Accompanied by col- 
ored geologic maps of areas near Boouton and 
Franklin Furnace. 

[Romaiks ou origin of serpentines 

in the vicinity of New York.] 

New York Acad. Sci. , Trans. , vol. 4, p. 29, | 
p. 1887. 

States his opinion tliat they arc altered 
stratified Archean rooks, mainly limestones 
and tcemolitic schists. 

Notes on glacial and preglacial 



drifts of New Jersey and Staten Island. 

New York Acad. Sci. , Trans. , vol. 4, pp. 28- 
33. 1887. 

Describes the extent of the yellow gravel 
and preglacial drift in the eastern United 
States, its characteristics, thickness, outcrops 
in con tact with overlying drifts, its exposures 
and relations on Staten Island and its flora in 
Cumberland County, New Jersey. Discusses 
the origin of the preglacial drift and its rela- 
tion to later deposits. 

— Geological notes in western Vir- 
ginia, North Carolina, and eastern Ten- 
nessee. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 5, pp. 
215-223. 1887. 



34 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75. 



BRITTON, N. L.— Continned. 

Some statenientB in regard to the slftteaand 
limeatones of the Great Valley. Notes on 
rocks and stractnre about Lnra^t Natural 
Bridge, and Balcx>ny Falls, Virginia; the con- 
tact of orysUalines and elastics in Due River 
Gorge. Tennessee ; Cranberry iron mine, Roan 
Mountain, and Warm Springs to Asheville, 
North Carolina. 

Additional notes on the geology of 



8taten Island. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 6, pp. 12- 
18. 1887. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, vol. 37, 
pp. 132-143, i col. 1890. 

Discussion of the. origin and relations of 
the serpentines and the structural features 
which give rise to the several outcrops in the 
vicinity of New York ; reference to the south- 
ward extension of the crystalline rocks of 
Staten Island, outcrop of preglacial drift near 
TToodrow, relations of drifts at Tompkins- 
ville, and to the driftless areas north and west 
of the terminal moraine. 

— On recent field work in the Archean 
areas of northern New Jersey and south- 
eastern New York. 

School of Mines Quarterly, vol. 9, pp. 33-39. 
1887. 

Describes the several members of the crys- 
talline series of the Highlands and of the 
Philadelphia- Westchester County region, the 
altered Paleozoic rocks at the Junction of 
the two areas near Peekskill, and some other 
Paleozoic contacts. Discusses the subdivi- 
sion of Archean and the relations of the 
groups to each other and to the Laurentian 
series of Canada. 

[Boring through drift and Cretace- 



ous sediments on Staten Island.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 7, p. 39 ; 
^V p. 1888. 
Six hundred feet to crystalline schists. 

— On an Archean plant from the white 
crystalline limestone of Sussex County, 

New Jersey. 

New York Acad. Sci., Annals, voL 4, pp. 
123-124; pl.VII. 1888. 

Canadian Record of Science, vol. 3, p. 184. 
1888. 

Includes reference to the distinctive feat- 
ures of the limestone belts in the highlands. 

— Notes on the modified drift. 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, Jan. 
14,1888; ip. 

Describes sections exposed in ditch through 
plain of modified drift on Staten Island. 

— [Notice of outcrop of Cretaceous 
clay on Eltingvillo road, Staten Island.] 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, 
April, 1889, 2 linos. 



BRITTON, N. L.— Continued. 

Am. If atnralift, voL 23, p. 1087. 1889. 

[Ootcroys of Cretaceoas clay and 

of TriAssic shales.] 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, Oct., 
1880; 12 lines. 
Notice of new localities. 

[Notice of a new exposore of Cre- 
taceoas near Grassmere Station, Staten 
Island. ] 

Staten Island If at. Sci. Assoc, Proc, 
March, 1860. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 563 ; i p. 1889. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., rot 8, p. 31; 
6 lines. 1880. 

Includes reference to its relations to the 
drifts. 

[Remarks on the yellow gravel for 

mation.] 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, 
April, 1889, 1 page. 

Am. Naturalist, vol 33, pp. 1032-1033. 1889. 
Discussion of its origin. 

r [Remarks on the relations of the 

crystalline rock series in the New York- 
New Jersey region.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 8, pp. 
52-53. 1889. 

Age and equivalency, especially in the 
Westchester Connty and Peekskill r^ion. 

[Remarks on recent discoveries in 



local Cretaceous and Quaternary ge- 
ology. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 8, p. 1T7. 
1889. 

Description of the occurrence of fossil-bear- 
ing concretions in the plastic clay series on 
Staten Island and on the Raritan River, New 
Jersey ; an outcrop of kaolin and of Creta- 
ceous gravels containing Paleozoic fossils at 
Prince's Ba>, and an exposure of bowlder 
clay at Arrochar, Staten Island; discusses 
the origin and history of the fossiliferoos 
pebbles in the Cretaceous and the yellow 
gravel deposits, and the relations and age of 
the ferruginous quartz and "jasperoid rock " 
overlying the serpentines of Hoboken and 
Staten Island. 

Geologic surveys, New Jersey Ar- 
chean. See [COOK, G. H.]. 

BROAD HE AD, G. C. Mitchell 
County, Texas. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 433-4S6. 1888. 

References to Red beds. Cretaceous and 
structure, and the occurrence of salt beds in 
the Permian in Texas and Kansas. 

The geological history of the Ozark 

uplift. 



DABTON.] 



BECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



35 



^ G. C. — Continaod. 

Am. Greologist, .voL 3, pp. 6-13. ' 1889. 

Sketch of the difttribntion, relations, and 
stratisrapby of the varions formations from 
Cambrian to lower Carboniferous, and the 
general stmctnre and history of the Ozark 
region. 

- The Missouri River. 



Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 148-155. 1888 . 
Description of its physiography and sketch 
of its geologic history. 

BRO'WN, Amos P. Modes of occur- 
rence of pyrite in bitaminous coal. 

Am. Inst. Mining En^eers, Trans., vol. 

16, pp. 539-546. 1888. 

Description of pyritiferons beds in Penn- 
sylvania ; discusses origin of the pyrite. 

BRO'WN, C. Newton. The Pittsburgh 
coal seam in Jefferson, Belmont, and 
Guernsey Counties. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey Beport, voL 6, Economic 
Geology, pp. 595-626 ; map. 1888. 

Description of outcrops and assooiatod 
strata. 

BROWIT, R. T. Hancock County. 

Indiana, Department of Oeol. and Nat. 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pV 187-197. 
1886. 

Description of its glacial drift and till de- 
posits and suggestions in regard to age and 
dip of the underlying formations. 

BRO'WNE, David H. The distribu- 
tion of phosphorous in the Luding- 
ton mine, Iron Mountain, Michigan. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 

17, pp. 616-632. 1889. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 299- 
310; pl8.vm-xm. 1889. 

Includes a brief description of the relations 
of the ore masses, and discussion of the 
genesis of iron ores in various parts of the 
Lake Superior region. 

BRUNTON, i). W. Aspen Mountain. 
Its ores and their mode of occurrence. 



BRUNTON, D. W.— Continued. 

Eng. and Mining Jour. , vol. 46, pp. 22*23, 
42-45,4°. 1888. 

Description of geologic relations, fknits, evi- 
dence of recent movements, evidences of 
glacial action, results of underground erosion 
and dolomitization of the lower Carbonifer- 
ous limestone. Discussion of the origin of 
the ores and their relations to the faults. 

BR7AN, Oliver N. The Cretaceous for- 
luatiou of southwestern Maryland. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 712, 713. 1889. 
Gives general account of its relations and 
distribution. 

BR7SON, John. [On the beaches along 
the southern side of Long Island.] 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 64-65. 1888. 
Discussion of their origin. 

[Notes on well hole on the south side 

of Long Island.] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 136-137, f p. 1888. 
List of beds penetrated and suggestion in 
regard to their origin. 

Artesian well, Woodhaveu, Loug 

Island, New York. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 214-215. 1889. 

Record of 556foot well down to rock. Com- 
ments on possible representation of Cretacuns 
in the record, the nature of the beds pierced, 
the absence of shells, and the finding of rouk 
in another well. 

The terminal moraine near Louis- 
ville. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 125-126. 1889. 
Describes glacial phenomena of the region 
and discusses their significance. 

BURKE, M. D. Drift. Its distribution 
aud character in the vicinity of Ciucin- 
nati, when considered as a probable 
source of water supply. 

Cincinnati Soc. Nat. Hist., Jour., vol. 11, 
pp. 69-75. 1888. 

Sketch of the geologic history of tbe region 
and of its drainage during the glacial epochs. 



C. 



CADELIi, H. M. The Colorado River of 
of the West. 

Scottish Goograj^eal Mag., voL 3, pp. 441- 
460, 2 plates, map. 1887. 

From Dutton's Tertiary History of the 
Grand Ca&on diatriet 

Califoznia, auriferous slates, Becker, 

DiLLER. IRBLAN. WHITE, C. A. 

building stones, Hanks. Jackson. 
bored. weUfly Kern County, Haggin. 



California— Continued. 

catalogue of fossils, Cooper. 

cements, Irelan. 

Chico and Tejon groups, Becker. 

White, C.A. 
coal, Asiibukner. Goodyear. 
Cretaceous of Meudociuo County, 

Becker. White, C. A. 
drift mining, Dunn. 
dry lakes, Jenney. 



36 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889, 



(BUXJCTBh 



California— Continned. 

faulttt of Sierra Nevada, Diller. Gil- 
bert. Ls ComiB. Russell, I. C. 
flora and history of coast isIandS| Lb 

CONTB. 

■ 

fossils from Pacific coast, White, C. A. 

ffeology of northern, Diller, 

glacier, Emmons, S. F. 

hanksite. Hanks. 

infusorial earth, Santa Barbara, 

Finch. 
Inyo County, Goodyear. 
Kem County, Goodyear. 
late Qaatemary geology, Hilgard. 
lithology of wall rocks, Attwood. 
Los Angeles County, Goodyear. 
microscopic study of rockn, Schuster. 
mineral resources by counties, Hanks. 

Irelan. 
Mono County, Whiting. 
Mount St. Helena, Hanks. 
natural gas, Weber. 
nomenclature of Cenozoic, LeConte. 
obsidian, Iddings. 
occurrence of Aucella, White, C. A. 
petroleum, asphaltum, and gas, 

Goodyear. Weber. 
origin of normal fjiults, Le Conte. 
primary quartz in basalt, Iddings. 
quicksilver deposits of Pacific coast, 

Becker. 
Report U. S. Geological Survey, 

Becker. 
Report of State Mineralogist, Hanks. 

Irelan. 
San Bernardino County, Goodyear. 
San Diego County, Goodyear. 

Hanks. 
Santa Barbara channel, Fewees. 
silicified wood, Friedrich. 
silver mines of Calico, Lindqren. 
stages of geologic history of Sierra 

Nevada, Gilbert. 
Tertiary, Becker. White, C. A. 
Tulare County, Goodyear. 
Ventura County, Bowers. 
California Academy of Sciences, Bul- 
letin, vol. 2. 
Washoe rocks, Becker. 
Flora of coast islands, Le Conte. 
California, Sixth Report of the IVIiner- 
alogist. 
Artesian well, Kern County, Ha(}- 

gins. 
Building atoneB, Hanks. 



California, Sixth Report of the Bffiner- 
alogist-v^ontinued. 

California minerals. Hanks. 

Mount St. Helena, Hanks. 

Report of mineralogist, Irelan. 

San Diego County, Hanks. 
California, Seventh Report of State 
MineralogiBt. 

Petroleum, asphaltum, and natural 
gas, Goodyear. 

Coal, Goodyear. ^ 

Natural gas, Weber. 

Petroleum and asphaltum in northern 
California, Wkber. 

Building stones, Jackson. 

Catalogue of California fossils, 
Cooper. 
California, Eighth Report of State 
Mineralogist. 

Mineral resources by counties, Ire- 
lan. 

Inyo County, Goodyear. 

Kem County, Goodyear. 

Los Angeles County, Gk)ODYEAR. 

Mono County, Whiting. 

San Bernardino County, Goodyear. 

San Diego County, Goodyear. 

Tulare County, Goodyear. 

Xsntura County, Bowers. 

Drift mining in California, Dunn. 

Lithology of wall rocks, Attwood. 

Natural and artificial cements, Ire- 
lan. 

Building stones, Jackson. 

C ALL ATVAT (Ch. ). On parallel struc- 
ture in rocks as indicating a sedimen- 
tary origin. 

Oeol. Mag., 3d decade, toL 4. pp. 351-354. 
1887. 

Reviews the conolnsions in Banana paper on 
the Cortlandt rooks entitled "On a case in 
which various massive crystalline rocks 
* * * were made through metamorphio 
agencies in one metamorphio process,*' and 
after discussing laminated structure in ernp< 
tive masses, suggests, from the evidence pre- 
sented, that the rocks in question are probably 
eruptive in their nature. 

Parallel structure in igneous rocks. 

Geol. Mag., 3d decade, voL 4, p. 479, i p. 
1887. 

States his obligation to Harker for directing 
his attention to the modified views of Dana on 
the nature of some of the Cortlandt rocks. 

CALVIN, S. Notes on the formations 
passed through iu boring the deep well 
at Washington, Iowa, 



DABT05.] 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



37 



CAIiVIN, 8.—- ContiDaed. 

Am. .Q«ologisty roL 1, pp. 28-81. 1888. 
Well record and discasaionof hcnizon of 
some of the formations, and light thrown on 
the stratigraphy of the Silnrian and lower 
formations in that region. 

Observations on the rertioal range 

of a certain species of fossils of the 
Hamilton period, in western Ontario. 
Am. aeologisty voL 1, pp. 81-88. 1888. 
Description of the occnrrenoe of the fossils, 
and the three sabdivisions of the formation 
indicated by the fannal relations. 

Some geological problems in Mnjs- 

catine County, Iowa, with special refer- 
ence to the rectification of the supposed 
Kinderhook near tHe month of Pine 

Creek. 

Iowa State Unir., Boll., toL 1, Na 1, pp. 7- 
18. 1888. 

Am. Oeologisty toL S, pp. 25-38. 1880. 

Presentation of paleontologio evidence of 
the Hamilton age of the beds in question and 
notice of their oeoarrence and relations at 
other localities, Montpelier, Andalusia, eta 
Reference to the distribution of the Carbon- 
iferous. Discussion of geologic history of un- 
conformity between Carboniferous and De- 
vonian and the origin of some of the deposits. 

Iron Bntte, Montana. Some pre- 



liminary notes. 

Am. Geologist, voL 4, pp. 95-87. 1889. 
Consista of references to geologic features. 

Cambrian. 
Arkanaaa, Pike County, Brannbr. 
Canada, Animikie and Huronian of 

Lake Superior, McEellar. 
borings in Manitoba, Dawson, G. M. 
basal series in Acadia, Matthew. 
Cape Breton and Newfoundland, 

Matthew. 
classification in Acadia, BIatthew. 
Eozoic and Paleozoic in Canada, 

Dawbon, J. W. 
FaUsof Montmorenci, Am. Geologist. 
fossils from Mount Steplien, British 

Columbia, Bohinoer. Walcott. 
geology of Mount Stephen, British 

Columbia, McConnell. 
geological classification in Quebec by 

Marcou^ Selwtn. 
geology of vicinity of Quebec, Mar- 

cou. 
geology of the Montmorenci, Em- 

HONS, £. James. Am. Geologist. 

Selwyn. 
glacial bowlders of our fisheries, 

HONSTMAK. 



Cambrian — Conti nued. 
Canada — Con tin ued. 
graptolltes from St. Lawrence Riyer 

region. Lapworth. 
how is the Caftibrian divided f BIat- 

THEW. 

labrador, cruise to northern, Packard. 

minerals of Quebec, Ells. 

New Brunswick, Bailey and McIn- 

NEs. Bailey. 
northern part of Domiuion, Dawson, 

G.M. 
Nova Scotia, Aylesford, Kings 

County, Honeyman. 
NoYa Scotia, Guys borough, Antigo- 

nish, and Pictou, Fletcher. 
Nova Scotia, Halifax and Colchester 

Counties, Hoxeymak. 
Nova Scotia, Lower Cambrian of 

Guysborough and Halifax Coun- 
ties, Fairbault. 
Ontario, iron ores, Ives. 
portions of eastern townships, Ells. 
Quebec group. Hunt. Dawson, J. 

W. Marcou. Selwyn. 
psammichnites from eastern Canada, 

Matthew. 
relations of Canadian to European, 

Dawson, J. W. 
St. John's group fauna, Matthew. 
supplement to rocks on Atlantic 

Coast of Canada, Dawson, J. W. 
south side of St. Lawrence River, 

Lapworth. 
Yukon expedition, Daws6n, G. M. 
Taconic of eastern Newfoundland, 

HOWLEY. 

Colorado, Aspen, Brunton. Emmons, 
S. F. Henrich. Lakes. Siver. 
Battle Mountain, Olcott. 
Eagle County, Tilden. 
geology of Colorado ore deposits. 

Lakes. 
iron resources, Chauvenkt. 
Leadville region, Emmons, S. F. 

Ihlseng, Blow. 
Rocky Mountains, Hills. 
structural relations of ore deposits, 
Emmons, S. F. 
Dakota^ Black Hills, Carpenter. 

Crosby. Winchell, N. H. 
Georgia^ geological survey, Spencer, 

J.W. 
Idaho, Coenr d'Alene mines, Clayton. 
graphitic anthracite, Jenney. 



38 



RECORD OP aEOLOOy FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



Cambrian — Continaed. 
Iowa, southeastern, Gokdok. 

well at Washini^toD, Calvin. 

well at DaveDport, Tiffany. 

Keokuk deep boriqg, Gordon. 
Maitie, northern, Bailbt. 

£astport region, Shaler. 
Massachusetfa, Boston Basin, Hobbs. 

Bristol County, Shaler. 

geology of Nahant, Lane. 

Great Barrington, Julkn. 

horizon of Nahant limestone, 

FOBRSTE. 

outer islands of Boston Harbor, 

Crosby. 
Taeonic region, Dana, J. D. Wal- 

COTT. 

Michigan, great primordial quartzite, 
WiNCHBLL, N. H. 

Irving and Chamberlin on Lake Su- 
perior sandstone, Am. Geologist. 

Menominee range, Fulton. 

Report, Lake Superior diyision, U. S. 
Geological Survey, Irving. 
Minnesota, Animikie black slate and 
quartzite, Winchbll, N. H, 

artesian wells, Hall, C. W. 

Carver and Scott, Sibley and Nicollet, 
Chisago, Isanti and Anoka, Otter 
Tail, Mille Lacs, and Kanabec, 
Pine and Becker counties, Up- 

HAM. 

descriptions of some maps, Upham. 

Fossils in red quartzite, Winchbll, 
N. H.. 

Great primordial quartzite, Winch- 
bll, N. H. 

Minnesota and Mississippi Valleys, 
WiNCHELL, N. H. 

Minneapolis and St. Paul region, 
Hall, C. W. 

Stillwater deep well, Meades. 

Wabasha, Goodhue, Dakota, Hen- 
nepin, and Washington Counties, 
Winchbll, N. H. 
Missouri, history of Ozark uplift, 

Broadhead. 
Montana^ Drumlummou veins, Clay- 
ton. 

Gallatin region, Haydbk. 
Nebraska, well at Lincoln, Russell, 

F. W. 
Nevada, Walcott. 

marbles, Newberry. 



Cambrian— Continaed. 

stratigraphio position of Olenellns, 
Walcott. • 
New Jersey, geological map, Cook, 

Martin. 
Neto Tork, building stones. Smock. 

Calciferous fossils of Lake Cham- 
plain, Whitfield. 

Camptonito dike, Washington 
County, Kemp and Marsters. 

Cambrian trilobites from Poughkeep- 
sie, Nbwbbrry. 

Dutchess County, Dwight. . 

Dutchess, Putnam, and Westchester 
counties. Smock. 

great primordial quartzite, Winch- 
ell, N. H. 

original Chazy rocks, Brainbrd and 
Seely. 

stratigraphic position of Olenellus, 
Walcott. 

Taoonic region, Dana, J. D. Wal- 
cott. 

Washington County, Walcott. 

well near Utica, Walcott. 

Wappinger Valley and Stissing 
Mountain, Dwight. 
Nomenclature and classification, classifi- 
cation and use of term ** Taconie/' 
Blake. Dana, J. D. Dawson, 
J. W. Dutton. Emerson. Em- 
mons, S. F. Ford. Frazer. 
Hague. Hall. Hitchcock. Irv- 
ing. Newberry. Selwyn. Wal- 
cott. Williams, G. H. Win- 
chbll, A. Winchbll, N. H. 

Barrande and the Taeonic, Marcou. 

Canadian geological classification in 
Quebec, by Marcou. Selwyn. 

classification by the American com- 
mittee, Winchbll, N. H. 

classification in Acadia, Matthew. 

crystalline schists. Hunt. 

elements of Primary geology, Hunt. 

geological questions, Frazer. 

history of Taeonic ideas, Dana, J. D. 

how is the Cambrian divided f Mat- 
thew. 

objections to the term Taeonic con- 
sidered, Winchbll, N. H. 

on crystalline schists. Hunt. 

position of Olenellus beds, Nathorst. 

principles of the adversaries of the 
Taeonic, Marcou. 



BARTOK.] 



B£COHD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



39 



Cambrian— Continued. 
New York — Continned. 
report of sabcommittee on Paleozoic, 
International Congress of Geolo- 
gists, WiNCHKLL, N. H. 
some forgotten Taconic literature, 

VOGDES. 

stratigraphio position of Olenellus, 
Walcott. 

Taconic of Boston, Hyatt. 

Taconic of Emmons, Newberry. 

Taconic question, Hunt. Winch- 
ell, A. 

Taconic system. Miller. 

Walcott on the Cambrian, Hicks. 
Hunt. Marcou. Science. Win- 

CHELL, N. H. 

North darolina, Hiawassee Valley, Col- 
ton. 
King's Mountain region. Van Ness. 
OhiOy southwestern, Jambs. 
Pennsylvania, Cumberland-Lebanon 
Valley. d'Invillibrs. 
four great sandstones, Claypole. 
origin of Appalachian materials, 

Claypole. 
Philadelphia region, Rand. 
Radnor Township, Delaware County, 
Rand. 

Tennessee, marble of Hawkins County, 
Willis. 
East Tennessee, Britton. 
Texas, Hill, R. T., Walcott. 
Utah, old Telegraph mine, Lavagnino. 
Wahsatch section, Walcott. 
stratigraphio position of the Olenel- 
lus, Walcott. 
Vermont, dates of reports on geology of 
Vermont, Marcou. Hitchcock. 
fossils in Lower Taconic of Emmons, 

Walcott. 
Taconic of Georgia and report on the 

geology of Vermont, Marcou. 
Taconic rocks and stratigraphy, 
Dana, J. D. 
Virginia, New River-Cripple Creek re- 
gion, d'Invillibrs andMcCREATH. 
Stevenson. 
Balcony Falls and Great Valley, 
Britton. 
Wisconsin, great primordial quartzite, 
Winchell, N. H. 

Campbell, John. T. origin of the 



CAMPBELL, John T.— Continned. 
Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 785-792. 
Discussion of nature and origin of the ma- 
terials and their mode of deposition, mainly 
in Indiana. 

Canada (comprising all British posses- 
sions in North America), 
age of Niagara River, Spencer. 
analysis of schist from Lake of the 

Woods, Adams. 
ancient shore lines near Toronto, Ives. 
Animikie and Huronian of Lake Su- 
• perior, McKellar. 
Aniniikie rooks at Thunder Bay, 

Courtis. 

Animikie slate and quartzites, Winch- 
ell, N. H. 

anorthosite rocks, Adams. 

Anticosti shell marl, analysis, Adams. 

apatite-bearing rocks. Hunt. Shutt. 

Archean rocks of the Northwest, 
Irving. Lawson. Winchell, A. 

Arctic currents and ice as factors in 
geology, Gasking. 

At-ta-wa-pish-kat and Albany rivers. 
Bell. 

Aylesford, Kings County, Honey- 
man. 
.Baffin Land, Boaz. 

basal series of Cambrian in Acadia, 
Matthew. 

Beaver mine, Ontario, BrenT. 

borings in Manitoba, etc., DawsoN, 
G. M. 

bowlder in Halifax coal, Spencer. 
James. 

Cambrian of Cape Breton and New- 
foundland, Matthew. 

Carboniferous of Capo Breton, Gil- 
pin. 

Caribou mining district, British Co- 
lumbia, Bowman. 

Cascade anthracite basin, Dawson, 
G. M. 

Cape Breton, Gilpin. 

Chazy at Aylmer, Quebec, Sowter. 

classiticatiou of Cambrian rocks of 
Acadia, Matthew. 

classification of early Cambrian and 
pre-Cambrian, Irving. 

coal of Vancouver Island, Adams. 

coal-bearing rocks, Adams. 

coal and slates of Pacific Coast, 
Bowman. 

coal in valley of Bow River, Dodge. 



40 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



Canada — Continued. 

conglomerates in gneisses, Winch- 

copper mining at the Cove, New- 
fonndland, Garlaj^d. 

correlation of Animikie and Iluro- 
nian, McKbllar. 

Cretaceous floras of northwest, Daw- 
son, J. W. 

Cretaceous plants, Yanconver Island, 
Dawson, G. M. Dawson, J. W. 

crnise to northern Labrabor, Pack- 
ard. 

Dawson on Quaternary and glacia- 
tion, Richardson. 

Dawson on Belly River series, Cope. 

Dawson on geology of Northwest Ter- 
ritory, Richardson. 

deposits of phosphate of lime, Pen- 
rose. 

diabase dikes of Rainy Lakes, Law- 
son. 

drift north of Lake Superior, Spencer. 

earlier Cretaceous of northwestern, 
Dawson, G. M. 

Eozoic and Paleozoic, Dawson, J. W. 

Eozoon Canadense (geology of Lau- 
rentian), Dawson, J. W. Selwyn. 

equivalency of Hurouian with "Pe- 
bidian. Hicks, 

expansion of Gnl of St. Lawrence 
and Canadian lakes, Bowman. 

explorations in portions of New 
Brunswick, Bailey and McInnes. 

foliation and sedimentation, Law- 
son. Winchell a. 

faults and foldings of Pictou coal- 
field, Gilpin. 

fauna of St. John group, Matthew. 

fossils in the city of Quebec, Ford. 

fossil woods from western, Dawson, 
J.W. 

geology of the Montmorenci, Em- 
mons, E. Ja^ies. Am. Geologist. 

geology of Winnipeg region, Mc- 
Charles. 

geology of vicinity of Quebec, 
Marcou. 

geology of Mount Stephen, B. C, 

McCONNELL. 

geology of Russell and Cambridge, 

Ontario, Ami. Craig. 
glacial geology of Nova Scotia, 

HONEYMAN. 



Canada— Continued. 

glacial bowlders of onr fisheries, 

HOXEYMAN. 

glaciation on Pacific Coast, Wright. 
glaciation.of eastern Canada, Chal- 
mers. 
glaciation of British Columbia, 

Dawson, G. M. 
glacier region, Selkirk range, British 

Columbia, Green. 
graptolites from Dease River. British 

Columbia, Lapworth. 
graptolites from St. Lawrence River 

region, Lapworth. 
Great Lake basins, Drummond. 
Guysborough, Antigonish and Pictou, 

Fletcher. 
gypsum in northern Manitoba, 

Tyrrell. 
Halifax and Colchester coonties. 

Nova Scotia, Honeyman. 
horizons of oil and gas, Orton. 
Hnroniau, Irving. Law son. Win- 
chell, A. 
Huronian at Sudbury on Lake Huron, 

Attwood. Bonne y, 
Huronian system. Bell. Selwyn. 
ice in Carboniferous period, Poole. 
indebtedness of American geologists 

to Canada, Dawson, J. W. 
invertebrate fossils from Pacific 

coast. White, C. A. 
iron and other ores in Ontario, Ives. 
Keweenawan and eastern sandstone 

on Hungarian River, Wadsworth. 
Lake Winnipeg to Hudson Bay, Low. 
landslide at Brantford, Spencer. 
Laramie, Dawson, J. W. 
lecture on geology. Ells. 
life history of Niagara ^ails, Pohl- 

MAN. 

limestone of East River, Nova Scotia, 
Gilpin. 

lower Cambrian, Nova Scotia, Fari- 
bault. 

Marcou on Taconic of Georgia, 
Selwyn. 

Marble Island and Hudson Bay, Bell. 

Mesozoic fossils from coast of British 
Columbia, Whiteaves. 

minerals of Ontario, Merritt. 

minerals of Quebec, Ells. 

Michipicoten Bay, Herrick, Tight 
and Jones. 



DABTON.l 



BECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



41 



Canada — Continned. 

m icro-petrograpby of drift of Ontario, 

COLKMAN. 

nataral gas in Quebec, Laflammr. 
nature of Montreal eruptiyes, Hunt. 
New Brunswick andNoya Scotia coal, 

Adams. 
New Bmnswick and Quebec glacia- 

tion, Chalmbrs. 
Newfoundland Cambrian, Matthkw. 

WAIX30TT. 

nortbern Alberta, etc., McConnbll. 
nortbem Yanoonyer Island, Dawson, 

G.M. 
neuiatopbyton ftom Devonian of 

Gasp6, Dawson, J. W. 
notes to accompany map of nortbern 

Canada, Dawson, G. M. 
Nova Scotia gold mines, Gilpin. 
Nova Scotian superficial geology, 

HONEYMAN. 

Old sbore lines of tbe Ontario basin, 
Gilbbrt. 

old channel of Niagara, Scoybll. 

on Sceptropora, (Lower Silurian, 
Manitoba), Ulrich. 

organisms of Silurian and Devonian 
in Moutbem New Brunswick, Mat- 
thew. 

origin of some geographic features, 
Beli^ 

original Hnronian region, Winch bll, 
A. WiNCHBLL, N. H. 

Permian moraine in Prince Edward 
Island, Bain. 

petrography of drift of central On- 
tario, Coleman. 

petroleum field of Ontario, BBLl. 

physical geography of Labrador, 
Packard. 

phosphatic nodnles in Chazy about 
Ottawa, Ami. 

places of interest on banks of Sas- 
katchewan, Panton. 

Pleistocene of Hivi^re Beaudette, 
Dawson, J. W. 

portions of eastern townships, Ells. 

Port Colbome well, McRab. 

prairies of Manitoba, Dbummond. 

primordial fossils from Mount 
Stephen, Bomi^ger. 

principles of adversaries of the Ta- 
Taconio, Marco u. 

psammichnites of Cambrian of east- 
ern Canada, Matthew. 



Canada — Continued. 

Quebec group, Dawson, J. W. Hunt. 

Laflammb. Lapworth. Marcou. 

Sblwyn. 
Rainy Lake region, Lawson. 
range of Hamilton fossils in Ontario, 

Calvin. 
region cast of Lake of the Woods, 

Lawson. 
region north of Vermilion Lake, CoM- 

STOCK. 

relations of Archean to Paleozoic in 

Quebec, Laflammb. 
relations of Arctic to Atlantic geol- 
ogy, Dawson, J. W. 
relations of Canadian to European 

geology, Dawson, J. W. 
relations along the Ottawa River, 

Ami. 
relations between geology of Maine 

and New Brunswick, Bailey. 
relations of British North American 

plants, Drummond. 
relations of Laramie, Dawson, J. W. 
relations of voleanics in eastern 

Quebec, Selwyn. 
rejoinder to Walcott on fossils from 

Mount Stephen, Romingbr. 
report on sheet 113, Ontario, Coste. 
rocks containing scap61ite, Adams 

and Lawson. 
rocks from Ontario (analyses),RiGGS. 
rock specimens from Arctic regions, 

Bell. 
Rocky Mountains, Dawson, G. M. 
Rocky Mountains near 5l8t parallel, 

MCCONNBLL. 

St. Lawrence basin and the Qreat 

Lakes, Spencer. 
scolithus of Chazy at Ottawa, Ami. 
sequence of formations about Ottawa, 

Ami. 
Silurian system of New Brunswick 

and Quebec, Bailbt. 
Silurian collections in Provincial 

Museum, Nova Scotia, Honeyman. 
Silurian fishes from King's County, 

New Brunswick, Matthew. 
sponges from Quebec group at Little 

Metis, Dawson, J. W. 
stratigraphy of the Hnronian, WiN- 

chell, N. H. 
Sudbury copper deposits, Collins. 
superficial geology of central plateau 

of northwestern Canada, Tyrrell. 



42 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



fBULL.7& 



Canada — Continued. 

Taconic of eastern Newfonndlandy 

HOWLEY. 

Taconic of Georgia and report on 
geology of Verraonty Marcou. 

Taconic system of EmmouS; Millbr. 
Walcott. 

Tertiary. Cope. 

tde Iroquois beach, Spencer. 

Thunder Bay region, Bell. Ingall. 

typds of Devonian • system in North 
America, Wiixiams, H. S. 

two systems confonnded in the Huro- 
nian, Winchell, A. 

unconformities of the Auimikie, 
Winchell, A. 

unconformity at falls of Montmo- 
renci, Am. Geologist. 

Ungava district, Labrador. Tur- 
ner. 

Utica formation at Pointra-Pic, Ami. 

Utica fossils from Kicking Horse 
pass, Lapwortu. 

Utica formation of Ottawa, Wood- 
ward. 

Utica fossils from Rideau, Ami. 

vicinity of Government farm, Ottawa, 
Ami. 

vicinity of Quebec, Laflamme. 
Marcou. Selwyn. 

woods and plants from Cretaceous of 
western Canada, Dawson, J. W. 

Yukon expedition, Dawson, G. M. 

Canada Geological and Natural His- 
tory Survey, Report, 1886. 

Summary report of the operation of 
the survey, Sklwyn, A. R. C. 

Northern Vancouver Island, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

Mesozoic fossils from coast of British 
Columbia, Whiteaves. 

Structure of portion of Rocky Moun- 
tains, McConnell. 

Northern Albei*ta, etc., Tyrrell. 

Between Lake Winnipeg and Hudson 
Bay, Low. . 

Portions of At-ta-wa-pish-kat and 
Albany rivers. Bell. 

Eastern townships. Ells. 

Surface geology, northern New Bruns- 
wick and southeastern Quebec, 
Chalmers. 

Counties of Victoria, Northumber- 
land, and Restigouche, New Bruns- 
wick, Bailey and McInnbs. 



Canada Geological and Natural His- 
tory Survey, Report, 1886— Cont'd. 
Counties of Gnysborongh, Anti- 

gouish, and Pictoa, Nova Scotia, 

Fletcher. 
Lower Cambrian of Guysborough 

and Halifax counties. Nova Scotia, 

Faribault. 
Notes to accompany, map of northern 

portion of Canada, Dawson, G. M. 
Analyses, Adams. 

Canada, Royal Society, Transactions, 
vol. 4. 
Ice phenomena, Bell. 
Indebtedness of American geologic 

science to Canada, Dawson, J. W. 
I^aranlie fossil plants, Canada, Daw- 
son, J. W. 
Silurian s^^stem of northern Maine, 

etc., Bailey. 
Palcozoic-Archean contact in Quebec, 

Laflamme. 
Borings in Manitoba, etc., Dawson, 

G. M. 
Glaciation and subsidence of eastern 

Canada, Chalmers. 
Cambrian faunae of Cape Breton and 

Newfoundlaud, Matthew. 
Genetic liistory of crystalline rocks, 

Hunt. 
Limestones of East River, Nova 

Scotia, Gilpin. 



voL 5. 



Petrography of drift of central On- 
tario, Coleman. 

Faults and foldings of Pictou coal 
field, Gilpin. 

Fossil woods and plants from Creta- 
ceous and Laramie of Canada, 
Dawson, J. W. 

Physiography and geology of Aroos- 
took county, Maine, Bailey. 

Correlation of Animikieand Huroniau 
of Lake Superior, McKellar. 

Geography and geology of Baffin 
land, BoAZ. 

Character of Ungava district, Labra- 
dor, Turner. 

Glacial erosion in Norway, etc., 
Spencer. 

Petroleum field of Ontario, Bell. 

— vol. 6. 

Huroniau system in Canada, Bell. 
Natural gas in Quebec, Laflamme. 



DASTON.] 



BBCORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



43 



Canada, Royal Society, Transactions, 
voL 6 — Continued. 
Nematophyton from Devonian of 

Gkisp^, Dawson, J. W, 
Organisdis in southern New Brans- 
wick, Matthew. 
Noya Scotia gold veins, Gilpin. 
Cretaceous plants, Vancouver Island, 
Dawson, J. W. and G. M. 
Canadian Institute, Proceedings, voL 4. 
Marble Island, Hudson Bay, Bell. 

voL 5. 

Canadian Apatite, Shutt. 
I Geology in public schools, Ives. 
Places of geological ii|terest near 

Medicine Hat, Panton. 
Diabase dikes of Rainy Lakes, Law- 
son. 
Iron and other ores of Ontario, Ives. 
voL 6. 



Old shore lines In Ontario basin, Gil- 

.bert. 
Ancient shore line near Toronto, 

Ives. 
Well at Port Colborne, McRae. 
Canadian Record of Science, voL 2. 
Canadian Rocky Mountains, Daw- 
son, G. M. 
Distribution of British American 

plants, Drum^ond. 
Fauna of St. John group, Matthew. 
Geologic structure of Canada and 

Europe, Dawson, J. W. 
Archean of Lake Superior region, 

Lawson. 
Petrography of drift of Ontario, 

Coleman. 
Fossil woods from western Canada, 

Dawson, J. W. 
Geology of Aroostook County, Maine, 

Bailey. 
Permian moraine in Prince Edward 

Island, Bain. 
Work of International Congress of 

Geologists, Gilbert. 
Scolithus of Chazy about Ottawa, 

Ami. 
— - vol. 3. 

Brilish North American plants, 

Drummond. . 
Basal series of Cambrian rocks in 

Acadia, Matthew. 
Prairies of Manitoba, Drummond. 
Sponges from Quebec group at Little 

Metis, Dawson, J. W. 



Canadian Record of Science, voL 3^ 
Continued. 

Classification of Cambrian of Acadia, 
Matthew. 

Fossils from Utica at Point t\ Pic, 
Canada, Aml 

Graptolites from Deasc River, British 
Columbia, Lapworth. 

Great lake basins of Canada, Drum- 
mond. 

Origin of some geographical features 
in Canada, Bell. 

Relations between geology of Maine 
and New Brunswick, Bailey. 

CretaceoQS plants from Port McNeill, 
Vancouver Island, Dawson, J. W. 

Archean plants from limestone of Sus- 
sex County, New Jersey, Britton. 

Canadian rocks containing scapolite, 
Adams and Lawson. 

Eozoon Canadense, Dawson, J. W. 

St. Lawrence basin aud the Great 
Lakes, Spenckr. 

Great Lake basins of the St. Law- 
rence, Drummond. 

Balarus in Pleistocene at Rivi^.re 
Beaudette, Dawson, J. W. 

Classification of Cambrian in Acadia, 
Matthew. 

Glaciatiou of eastern Canada, Chal- 
mers. 

Gypsum in northern Manitoba, Tyr- 
rell. 
CANNON, George L., jr. The Qnate- 
nary of the Denver Basiu. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Proc, vol. 3, pp. 48-70. 
1889. 

Description of a series of post- Tertiary de- 
posits and erosions, and discussion of tbeir 
history. 

On the Tertiary Dinosauria found in 

Denver beds. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Proc, vol. 3, pp. 140-147. 
1889. 

liiolades references to the general geologic 
relations of the region, and presents evidence 
to prove that the bones were found in place. 

Carboniferous (including Permian). 
Alahamay coal fields, Ashburner. 

Spencer, J. W. 
Arizona, Duiton. IIenrich. Wendt. 
Arkansas f coals, Ashburner. Wins- 
low. 
age of crystalline rocks, Branner. 
northern limit of Mesozoic, Hay, R. 
west central, Comstock. 



44 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 7£ 



Carboniferona — Continued. 
Calif omiaf Becker. Dutton. (Good- 
year. Hanks. Irelait. Whitino. 

Canada f absenoe on At-ta-wa-pish-kat 
and Albany rivers, Bell. 

bowlder in Halifax coal, Spencer, J. 

Cape Breton, Qilpin. 

coal-bearinf; rooks, Adams. 

Eozoic and Paleozoic of Canada, 
Dawson, J. M. 

ice in Carboniferons period, Poole. 

Meant Stephen, British Columbia, 
McConnell. 

New Brnnswick, Bailey. ■■ 

northern part of Dominion, Daw- 
son, G.M. 

northern Yancouyer Island, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

Nova Scotia, faalts and foldings of 
Pic ton coal field, Gilpin. 

Nova Scotia, Gnysborough, Antigo- 
nish, and Pictoa Fletcher. 

Nova Scotia, limestone of East River, 
Gilpin. 

Nova Scotia, Halifax and Colchester 
counties, Honeyman. 

Permian moraine in Prince Edward 
Island, Bain. 

Rocky Montains near the 51st paral- 
lel, MCCONNELL. 

Yukon expedition, Dawson, G. M. 
Colorado f Aspen region, Brunton. 
Emmons, S.F. Henrich. Lakes. 

SiVER. 

Eagle County, Tilden. 

geology of Colorado ore deposits. 

Lakes. 
Leadville region, Emmons, S. P. Ihl- 

SENG. Blow. 
iron resources, Chauvenet. 
marbles of western, Newberry. 
mountain upthrnsts, Uinta, etc., 

White, C. A. 
northwestern coal region, Hewitt. 
oil fields of Fremont County, Ihlseno. 
oil fields, Newberry. 
Ouray County, Eedzie. 
Rocky Mountain region, Emmons, S. 

P. Hills. 
San Juan region, Ihlseng. 
sylvanite mines, Enq. and Mining 

Jour. 
Dakotay Black Hills, Carpenter. 

Crosby. 



Carboniferous— Continued. 
GeorgiOj formation of coal beds, WaKd- 

ROPER. 

Geological Survey, Spei^cbr, J. W. 
Idaho, Caribou Mountain, Van Diest. 
nUnoii, Fossil fuels, Comstock. 

Peoria County, 'Chapman. 
Indiana, Dauntless core drill. Say- 
brook. Eng. and Mining Jour. 

Keokuk group at Crawfordsville, 
Beachler. 

Geological Survey Report, Brown. 
GoRBY. GoRBY and Lee. Thomp- 
son, W. 
Iowa, chert in upper coal measures. 
Am. Geologist. 

coal measures of central Iowa, 
Kbyes. 

lower Carbonic gasteropoda from 
Burlington, EIeyes. 

fossils from coal measures of Dee 
Moines, Keyes. 

Johnson County, Webster. . 

Muscatine County, Calvin. 

Southeastern Iowa, Gordon. 

well at Davenport, Tiffany. 

well at Washington, Calvin. 
Kansas, coal measures, Bailey, E. H. S. 

WOOSTBR. 

coal measures of Lyon County, 
salt beds in Permian, Broadhead. 

Kelly. 
gas in eastern Kansas, Hay, R. 
geology of (lecture), Hay, R. 
history of geologic work in, Hay 

and Thompson. 
Leavenworth well, Jameson. 
Report on geology, Hay, R. 
region south of the Arkansas, Cra- 

GIN. 

section in Wilson County, Hay, R. 

Trias of Kansas, Hay, R. 
Kentucky, Bath, Fleming, Clark, Lin- 
coln, Mercer, Montgomery, and 
Washington counties, Linney. 

coals, Proctor. 

Elliott County, Crandall. Diller. 

Jackson Purchase region, Lough- 
ridge. 

Letcher, Harlan, Leslie, Perry, and 
Breathitt counties, Hodge. 

Lower, north fork, middle and south 
forks of the Kentucky, Hodgb. 

Marion County, Knott. 



PABTON.l 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



45 



Carboniferous — Con t i d aed. 
Kentucky — Continued. 
Nelson County, Linnet. 
Pound Gap region, Crandall. 
upper Cumberland valley, McCreath 

and d'Invillibrs. 
western Kentucky coals and cokes, 
Allan. 

Ma88<whu8ett8f Kemp. Shalbr. 
MainCf Bailet. 
Mexico, Goodfellow. 
Missouriy fcrra of ore deposits in lime- 
stone, Henrich. 

echinodermata, Reyes. 

history of Ozark uplift, Broadhead. 

Macon County, McGee. 

Sedalia, Sampson. 

southwestern Missouri, Clerc. 
Montana^ form of ore deposits in lime- 
stone, Henrich. 

Gallatin region, Hatden. 
NebrMha, soils, Hicks. 

well at Lincoln, Russell, F. W. 

well in Pawnee County, Russell, 
F. W. 

New Mexico, San Pedro copper mines, 

Henrich. 
Zufli plateau, Dutton. 
New York, Genesee section, Williams, 

H. S. 

petroleum and gas regions. Ash- 
burner. 
Nomencliiiure and classification, report 
of subcommittee on upper Paleo- 
zoic, International Congress of Ge- 
ologists, Stevenson. 
Ohio, Berea grit in northeastern, Gush- 
ing. 

Berea grit oil, and gas, Orton. 

geology of Ohio, Orton. 

Licking County, Herrick. 

oil and gas, Orton. 

Ohio Valley, Shaler. 

Pittsburg coal, Brown. 

Pomeroy and Federal Creek coal field, 

LOVEJOY. 

report on oil and gas, Orton. 
Waverly group, Herrick. 
Oregon, western, Dutton. Lang. 
Pennsylvania, Bernice anthracite basin, 
Clagborn. 
Cambria County, Fulton. Prossek 

and Harden. 
coal at L:win, Humphreys. 
four great sandstones, Claypoi^. 



Carboniferous — Continued. 
Pennsylvania — Continued, 
history of rivers and valleys, Davis, 

W. M. 
Lehigh River section. Hall, F. A. 

WiNSLOW. 

lower Carboniferous, Stevenson. 

materials of the Appalachians, Clay- 
pole. 

northern Pennsylvania, Williams, 
H. S. 

oil and gas, Carll. 

Pittsburgh coal bed and its disturb- 
ances, Wasmuth. 

Pittsburgh coal region, d'Invilliers. 

pyrlte in bituminous coal. Brown. 

reports on anthracite region. Hill, 
F. A. 

section of Alleghany Mountains, 
Fulton. 

Somerset County, Fulton. Lesley. 
Prosser. 

southern anthracite region and its 
disturbances, Wasmuth. 

stratification and structure, Was- 
muth. 

Waverly, Beecher. 
Ehode Island, founa and^flora, Packard. 

conglomerates in New England 
gneisses, Hitchcock. 

report on geology. Providence 
Franklin Society. 

geology of Bristol County, Massa- 
chusetts, Shaler. 
Tennessee, East Tennessee minerals, 

COWLAN. 

Texas, Cummings. Hill, R. T. Wal- 

COTT. 

Bnrnet County, Walker. 

coal in, Steeruwitz. 

Colorado River, Hill, R. T. 

geology of Texas, Hill, R. T. 

Mitchell County, Broadhead. 

northern Texas, Cummings. 

Permian, Hill, R. T. White, C. A. 

south central Texas, Owen. 

western Texas, Cummings. Hill, 
R. T. 
United States, Coals of, Ashburner. 

Flora, Lesquereux. 
Virginia, Greenbrier County, Page. 

coals of southwestern, Killbrew. 

lower Carboniferous, Stevenson. 

New River region, dInvilliers and 
McCreath. 

southwestern Virginia, Stevenson. 



46 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



• [BULL. 75. 



Carboniferous— Continued. 
Virginia — Continued, 
nppei Cumberland valley, McCreatu 
and dInvilliers. 
West Virginiaf coal from Jefferson 
County, analysis, Whitfield, J. E. 
Wgomingt report of Territorial Geolo- 
gist, RiCKBTTS. 

CARLL, John F. The oil and gas re- 
gion. 

Geol. Snnrey of Fenn., Report for 1886, 
part 2, pp. 575-786, pis. 1-5, 4 plates in pocket. 
1887. 

Id eludes a sum mary of geologic sir acture and 
review of strati j^raphy of Venango oil group 
and overlying rooks, illastrated by a series of 
columnar sections in Pennsylvania and New 
York ; gives well records from most of the oil 
and gas counties of Pennsylvania, West Vir- 
ginia, Ohio, and New York. Accompanied by 
a geologic map of southwestern Pennsylvania, 
by d'Invilliers, with columnar sections by 
Carll. 

[Natural gas in Pennsylvania.] 

IT. S. Greol. Survey, Mineral Resources, 

1887, pp. 467-474. 1888. 
Abstract from Am. Manufacturer, Natural 

gas supplement 1886. 

CARPENTER, Franklin R. Notes on 
the geology of the Black Hills. 

Preliminary report of the Dakota School of 
Mines on the geology, mineral resources, and 
mills of the Black Hills of Dakota, pp. 11-52, 
map. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 202-203. 
1889. 

Description of the several formations and 
discussions of their relations, the age of sub- 
divisions of A rchean, nature of the granites, 
and the geologic history of the history. 

Upon the mineral resources of the 

Black Hills, their character, occurrence, 
and extent. 

Preliminary report of the Dakota School of 
Mines upon the geology, mineral resources, 
and mills of the Black Hills of Dakota, pp. 
107-171. 1888. 

Abstract^ Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 203-204, 
f p. 1889. 

Includes incidental references to relations of 
associated crystalline rocks and Potsdam sand- 
stone, ongin and nature of the granites and 
ores, building stones, limestones, and clays. 

Ore- deposits of the Black Hills of 

Dakota. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 570-598, 1 map. 1889. 

Includes incidental references to geologic 
relations at various localities, mostly in con- 
nection with the "Potfidam sandstone and its 
associated intmsives." Beproduces a colored 
map. 



Central America, ancient footprint 
from Nicaragua, Brinton. 

Rbietio plants from Honduras, New- 
berry. 

Rosario mine, Honduras, Leggett. 

Triassio plants from Honduras, New- 
berry. 

Vertebrate beds in Honduras, Nason. 

CHAIiMERS, R. Report to accompany 
quarter-sheet maps, 8 SE. and 3 SW. 
Surface geology. Northern New Bruns- 
wick and- southeastern Quebec. 

Oanada Geol. and Nat. Hist. SozreTs, Be- 
port, 1886, part M« pp. 39, m^ps 6-7 in atlas. 
1887. 

Abstract, Ibid.t part A, pp. 40-41. 

Description of superficial formations, ter- 
races, and other ancient drainage and shore 
features, marshes, flats, and glacial striaB, 
and discussion of evidence respecting glacia- 
tion and subsidence of the St. Lawrence val- 
ley below Quebec, and the glaciation of tho 
Baio des Chaleurs basin and Gasp^ peninsula; 
genetic history of topographic and drainage 
features of the region, and the relation and 
origin of the drifts. 

On the glaciation and Pleistocene 

subsidence of northern New Brunswick 
and southeastern Quebec. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., voL 4, section 
IV, pp. 13»-145. 1887. 

Reviews the glacial theory and the his- 
tory of glacial phenomena in the region. Sum- 
marizes facts indicating local glaciation in the 
Bale des Chaleurs district, and a northwest- 
erly movement of local glaciers on the south- 
ern slope of the St. Lawrence valley, espec- 
ially in the area between Bivi6re da Loup and 
Metis, the terraces, drift, and glaciation of 
which are described. Discossea the amount, 
extent, and irrfgularities of Pleistocene sub- 
sidence in eastern Canada. 

Glaciation of eastern Canada. 

Canadian Record of Science, voL 3, pp. 319- 
333. 1889. 

Abstracts, Greol. Magazine, III, vol. 6, pp. 
211-214. 1889. Ottawa Naturalist, vol. 3, pp. 
111-112, 1 p. 1889. (By author.) Am. Geolo- 
gist, vol. 6, pp. 240-244. 1890. 

R68um6 account of glacial phenomena in 
the region, and discussion of their signifi- 
cance. 

CHAAIBERLIN, B. B. Minerals of 
Stateu Island. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 5, pp. 

228-230. 1887. 
Incidental references to the serpentines and 

Triassic traps. 

CHAMBERLIN, T. C, Report * * 

glacial division^ 



DABTON.l 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



47 



CHAMBERLIN, T, C— CoDtinned. 

XT. S. Geol. Surrey, Sixth Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1884-'85, pp. 33-40. 1883. 

Describes the i-esnlts of his ovm studies and 
those of his assintants, as follows: 1. J. E. 
Todd, on the glacial lake of the Bijou Hills 
region ; the terraces of the Missouri and Big 
Sioux Bivers; the outer moraine from Kim- 
ball to Wall Lake, and the second moraine, 
from Cauistoga to Mitchell ; the relation of 
the loess to the glacial drift and evidence of 
post-glacial deformation of' the loess surface, 
and the discovery of Pliocene beds at Frank- 
fort, Nebraska^ Niobrara ohalkstoue near 
Canton and north of Mitchell,|bed8 of siliceous 
flour under drift on Bazile Biver, coal in np> 
per Dakota beds at Ponoa, and several Dakota 
sandstone outcrops. 2. B. D. Salisbury, on 
the driftless area of the Upper Mississippi 
valley. 3. G. F. Wright, on the southtm 
boundary of drift in Dlinois. 4. G. H. Stone, 
on eskers and glaciation in Maine. 5. W. M. 
Davis, on drumlins of Massachusetts, and 
glaciation of Mount Monadnock. 6. I. M. 
Buell, on bowlder trains of central Wiscon- 
sin. 7. D. W. Mead, on glacial flood-plains 
and the terrace systems of the Chippewa Val- 
ley of Wisconsin. And his own work, con- 
sisting of a reconnaissance along the Cbicago, 
Milwaukee, St Paul and Omaha Bailroad in 
northwestern Wisconsin ; a study of the south- 
eastern border of the driftless area; and a trip 
through southern Iowa, western Missouri, 
Dortbeastem Kansas, and westward, and 
through a portion of the Orange sand region. 
In a summary of the results of this trip there 
are discussed the non-morainal character of 
the drift border in Nebraska, Kansas, and 
Missouri; the non-glacial derivation of the 
Orange sand, the preCbaroplain ago of the 
loess of the Lower Mississippi, and tlie post- 
Quaternary orographic movements indicated 
by the distribution of the loess and the rela- 
tions of some drainage features. 

Note respeoting the term Agnotozoic. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 254- 
2&5. 1888. 

Does not wish name retained simply bo- 
oanse first proposed by him. Accredits the 
"^erm Kewoenawan to Brooks or Brooks and 
^uropolly. 

Report — division of glacial geology. 

XT. S. G^eoL Surrey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Lowell, 188S-'86, pp. 76-85. 1888. 

A geneiral account of the various investiga- 

t^ns and their progress, including references 

'^o the drift limit and products of local glacia- 

'^ion in the upper Missouri region ; glacial fea 

't^ures, old lake terraces and drainage relations 

tn Montana and Idaho ; observations of J. £. 

^odd on limits of drift moraines, striae, ter- 

Y^aces, old lake beds, and various glacial fea- 

t^uresin southern Dakota, position of drift 

'l>order is east central Nebraska, relations of 



CHAMBERLIN, T. C— Continued, 
bowlder clay near Berks, Nebraska, and the 
relations of volcanic ash deposits in Seward 
County, Nebraska; studies of Warren Up- 
ham on the altitude of the beaches of Lake 
Agassiz: work of George H. Stone on the 
gravel deposits and osar of Maine ; observa- 
tions of N. S. Shaler on the glacial train from 
Cumberland, Bhode Island, origin of Karnes, 
and the course of the ice flow on the coast of 
Maine and southeastern Massachusetts, and 
G. K. Gilbert's studies on the beaches of Lake 
Ontario. 

The rock scorings of the great ice 



invasions. 

17. S. Geol Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 147-248, PI. 8. 1888. 
^ Geographic distribution, topographic rela- 

tions, topography as affecting the distribu- 
tion of strisB and condition of glacial flowage, 
cross striation, conditions aflfecting scoring 
action and the scorings, method of determin- 
ing the point of motion, accompanied by map 
of northern United States, showing distribu- 
tion of glacial drifts and striaB. 

and SALISBCJRY, H.}), Prelim- 
inary x^^P^^ o^ ^^^ driftless area of the 
Upper Mississipi valloj'. 

tJ. S. Geol Survey, Sixth Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1884-'85, pp. 199-322, pis. 23-29. 1885. 

Abstract, Science, vol. 10, pp. 306-307. 1887. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp 122-125. 1888. 

Describes the togography, geology, erosion, 
drainage, surface deposits, and circun^acent 
glacial phenomena, the morainic, the attenu- 
ated till and bowlder and attenuated drift 
borders. Discusses the light which the drift- 
less area throws upon the glacial bistory of 
the adjoining region and the sequence and 
cliaracter of events of the glacial periods ; the 
origin and relations of the topographic and 
drainage features; erosion; nature, origin, 
and relations of the loess and residuary pro- 
ducts, and the origin of the border deposits. 
In a general r6sum6, sketches the apparent 
history of the region, and reviews the causes 
to which the driftless area is due. 

CHAPIN, J. H. The Hanging Hills. 
Meriden Sci. Assoc, Trans., vol. 2, pp. 

23-28. 1887. 

Describes topographic features and extent 
of ridges of which the Hanging Hills are a 
a part, and calls attention to some contacts of 
trap and sandstone. Discusses the nature 
and relative ages of the trap sheets, piesent- 
ing some evidence which is thought to indi- 
cate intrusion. 

The trap ridges at Meriden again. 

Meriden Sci. Assoc, Trans., vol. 3, pp. 34- 
36. 1888. 

Reference to their extrusive nature and the 
relations and significance of the associated 
ash bod. 



48 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 78. 



CHAPMAN, W. H. Geology of Peoria 
County. 

Peoria Sci. Assoc., Bull., voL 1, pp. 14-21. 
1887. 
Not By n. 

China, Kaiping coal mine, Kwonq Yung 

KWANG. 

CHATARD, Thomas M. The gneiss 
danyte contacts of Cornndam Hill, 
North Carolina, in relation to the origin 
of cornndam. 

17. S. Geol. Snrrey, Bnll., toL 7, pp. 45-63, 
Ko.42. 1887. 

Abstract Eng. and Mining Jour., toI. 46, 
p. 46, i col., 40. 1888. 

Includes a description and analyses of th^ 
rocks and a discussion of their chemic rela- 
tions and the origin of the dunjte. 

The peridotite of Elliott County, 

Kentucky. 

17. S. Geol. Sonrey, Bull., voL 7, pp 136- 
137, No. 42. 1887. 
Analyses of dike and associated rocks. 

Yellowish brown, kaolinized, de- 
composed trap from four miles west of 
Sanford, North Carolina. 

U. S. GooL Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 138, J p.. 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Mica andesite from a cation on the 

east side of San Mateo Mountain, New 
Mexico. 

17. S. Geol. Sfunrey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 139, i p., 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Hypersthepe andesite from San 

Francisco Mountains, Arizona. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 130, ^ p. 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Basalt from six miles northeast of 

Grant, New Mexico. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., voL 7, p. 140, 2 p., 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Yellow sandstone from the Armejo 

quarry, Colorado. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 141,^ p 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analyses. 

CHAUVENET, Regis. Preliminary 
notes on the iron resources of Colorado. 
Colorado School of Mines, Report of field 
work and analyses, 1886, pp. 5-16. 1888. 

Includes very brief descriptions of iron ore 
beds in Cretaceous, Carboniferous, Silurian, 
and crystalline formations. 



CHESTER, Fr^eriok D. The State 
line serpentines and associated rocks; 
a preliminary notice of the serpentines 
of southeastern Pennsylvania. [Ab- 
stract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., vol. 36, p. 
224. 1888. 

Petrographio characteristics and relations 
of various areas. 

CHICELERINO, J. W., jr. The Mnir 
glacier, Alaska. 

Sci. Am. Snpt., voL 26, pp. 10789-10790, No. 
675, i p., folio. 188& 
[Read to Washington Philosophical Sooiety 
• Hay, 1887.] 

Peference to evidences of ^Utcial action on 
the shores of Glaofer Bay. 

CHISM, Richard E. The drainage of 
the valley of Mexico. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 46, pp. 478-480, 
500-501,522-524. 40. 1888. 

Includes a brief geologic sketch on page 
470; reference to volcanic rooks, metamorphic 
Mesosoic limestones, and emergence of the 
valley. 

The Catorce mining district. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 48, pp. 340-342, 
388-389,476-478. 1889. 

Includes a brief general description of the 
geology. 

Sierra Mojada, Mexico. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
16, pp. 542-587, map. 1887. 

Describes very briefly the relations and 
structure of the supposed Cretaceous lime- 
stones, and (p. 37) states his opinion in regard 
to the formations on the eastern slope of the 
Sierra Madre. 

CHISOLM, Frederic F. The Elk Head 
anthracite coal field of Bontt Oonnty, 
Colorado. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Free, vol. 8, pt.2, pp. 
147-149. 1887. 

Describes coal beds in Fox Hill rocks baked 
into anthracite in places by a flow of ** nephe 
line tephrite," which covers the a^aceut 
country. 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History, 
Journal, vol. 10. 
Well at Oxford, Ohio, James. 

vol. 11. 

Drift in vicinity of Cincinnati, 

BUBKE. 

Ancient channel of the Ohio at Cin- 

cinnati, James. 
Ivorydale well in Mill Creek valley, 

James. 



ABTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 JO 1889. 



49 



Cincinnati Society of Natural History, 
Journal, voL 12 — Contiuued. 
Sedimentation in Cincinnati group, ^ 

James. 
Devonian plants from Ohio, New- 

BBRBT. 

;LAGH0RN, Clarence R. Notes on 
the Bemice anthracite coal basin, Snl- 
liyan County, Pennsylvania. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 60&-616. 1889. 

Beferenee to geologic relations and strac- 
tnre. 

TIiARK, E. S. Some norytes and gab- 
bros. See HISRRICE:, C. L., and 
DEMING, J. L. 

Til AUK, William B. Anew ammonite 
wbioh throws additional light npon 
the geological position of the Alpine 

BbsBtic. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 85, pp. 118- 
119. 1888. 

References to Tyrolean formations and dis- 
cussion of position of Bhsstic beds. 

— On three geological excursions made 
daring the months of October and No- 
vember, 1887, into the southern coan- 
ties of Maryland. 

Johns Hopkins ITniT., Oircnlars, voL 7, pp. 
65-«7, No. 63, 4°. 1888. 

Stratigraphic description and lists of fossils 
of Miocene and Eocene. 

Discovery of fossil-bearing Creta- 
ceous strata in Anne Arundel and Prince 
Oeorge oonnties, Maryland. 

Johns Hopkins Uni^., Oircnlars, voL 8, No. 
C9, pp. 20-21, 40. 1889. 

Description of a number of localities in the 

iMUiks and Ticinitj of the Severn River south 

of Bowie, and at Fort Washington on the 

Potomac. Lists of fossils and expression of 

opinion in regard to equivalency of the beds. 

i^ARKE, F. W. Fulgurite from 
^^hiteside County, Illinois. 

U. S. Geol. Snr rej. Bull., vol. 7, p. UO, i p., 
liro.42. 1887. 

Analyses. 

Blue and buff limestones from quar- 

'^'ieg of the Hoosier Stone Company, 

Bedford, Indiana. 

IT. S. G-eol. Surrey, Bull., vol. 7, pp. 140-141, 
i p., No. 42. 1887. 
Analyses. 

Volcanic dust. 

17. S. Geol. Surrey, Bull., vol. 7, pp. 141, 112, 
ip.. No. 42. 1887. 

Analyses: From Gallatin Yalley, Montana, 
«ftd month of Basile Creek, Nebraska. 

BiilL75 4 



CLARKE, P. W.—Continued. 
Three coals from Gulf, North Caro- 
lina. 

n. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 146, i p., 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analyses. 

Some nickel ores from Oregon. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 35, pp. 483-488. 
1888. 

Includes an analysis of the associated 
peridotite and a report on its mineralogio 
constitutents by J. S. Diller. Also a reference 
to the peridotite of Webster, North Carolina, 
by J. S. Diller. 

CLARKE, J. M. [Sink holes at Attica, 
Wyoming County.] 

New York, Sixth Report of the Geologist, 
188^, pp. 34-35. 1887. 

Describes two sink holes in one of wbioh 
mastodon remains were found. 

CLA7POLE, E. W. The lake age in 
Ohio, or some episodes in the retreat of 
the North American glacier. 

Edinburgh Geol. Soc, Trans., vol. 6, pp. 
421-458, 4 phites. 1887. 

• Abstracts, American Nat., vol.22, p. 152,4 
p. 1888. Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 63-64. 
1888. 

Popular Science Monthly, voL 33, pp. 
428-429. 1888. 

Points out the consequences of a glacial 
dam across the Ohio and the probable size, out* 
let. duration, dissolution, and deposits of the 
"Lake Ohio" to which it gave rise. Follows 
the retreat of the glacier to the borders of Lake 
Erie and describes a series of lakes which 
must then have extended from the glacier 
front southward to the divide and emptied 
into affluents of the Ohio. Discusses the rela- 
tion of these lakes to each other at their sev- 
eral stages, and to the adjacent and subse* 
quent drainage and topography. Considers the 
extent and history of the successive drainage 
channels of the glacial Lake ** Erie-Ontario." 

The matejrials of the Appalachians. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 955-962,1054- 
1060. 1887. 

Discusses the amount, thinning, character, 
and origin of the Paleozoic sediments in Penn- 
sylvania, calling attention to the present 
small areas of pre-Paleozoic r<;^ks and discuss- 
ing its probable former extent and the promi« 
nent presence of the quartzose rocks which 
supplied materials for the congloratitates and 
sandstones. Describes the extent, variations 
in thickness and coarseness of materials in 
the several sandstone series, and advances a 
hypothesis of successive uplifts of quartzose 
"Archean" rocks at the beginning of the 
deposition of each of these series. Discusses 
the position and character of these uplifts and 
the mode of deposition of the sediments. 



50 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



fBULUTS. 



CLA7POLE, E. W.— Continued. 

**Lake Cuyahoga," a study iu glacial 

geology. 

Am. Auoc. Adv. Science, Froc, vol. 36, p. 
218. 1888. 

Abstract. Paper in full in Edinburgh 
Geol. Soc, Trans., 1887, as described above. 

The four great sandstones of Penn- 
sylvania. [Abstract.] 

Am. Auoc. Adv. Science, Proc, vol.36, p. 
227, i p. 1888. 

Discusses the origin and mode of deposition 
of the materials and the location of the land 
from which they were derived. 

Singular subterranean commotion 

near Akron, Ohio. 

Am. G^eologist, vol. 1, pp. 190-192. 1888. 
Includes reference to pre-glaoial valley now 
occupied by the Tuscaroras. 

On some investigations regarding 

the condition of the interior of the 
earth. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 382-386, vol. 2, pp. 
28-^5. 1888. 

Abstract, British Assoc. Adv. Sci., Report 
of fifty-eighth meeting, pp. 669-670. 1889. 

Exposition and discus sion of a paper by 
Mr. Davison., 

The eccentricity theory of glacial 

cold versus the facts. 

Edinburgh G-eol. See, Trans., vol. 5, pp. 
534-548. 1888. 

Includes discussion of the rate of recession 
of Niagara Falls, the falls of St. Anthony, and 
various minor falls in New York and Ohio, as 
bearing on the date of the last period of 
glacial cold. Also discusses the history of 
the Niagara-St. Lawrence drainage and the 
Upper Mississippi. 

Glaciers and glacial radiants in the 



ice age. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 73-94. 1889. 

A general discussion of the conditions, 
extent, and results of glaciation in North 
Amedca and elsewhere. 

The story of the Mississippi-Missouri. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 361-377. 1889. 

A general sketch of the geologic history of 
North America with especial reference to the 
MississippirMissouri region. 

Falls of rock at Niagara. 

Nature, vol. 39, p. 367, ^ col. 1 889. 

Cites newspajwr accounts of the fall of 
great masses from the edge of the shelf over 
which Niagara falls, and expresses opinion in 
regard to the mean rate of recession. 

CLAYTON, Joshua E. The Drum- 
luTiimon group of veins and their mode 
of formation. 



CLAYTON, Joshua £. — Continued. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 46, pp. 85-86, 
106-108, 4°. 1888. 

Extract from report to Montana Ck>mpany 
of London. 

Description of ge<riogic relations at contact 
of granite and metamorphic beds. Discus- 
sion of the origin and history of the mineralL 
sation. 

The CoBur d'Alene silver-lead mines. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 45, pp. lOS-109, 
4°. 1888. 

Description of geology of region and discus- 
sion of structural relations. 

[CLERC, F. L.] The lead and zinc 
ores of southwest Missouri. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 43, pp. 397-398. 
1887. 

(From a pamphlet not seen.) 

Discusses age and origin of slate beds in de- 
pressions in surface of Carboniferous lime- 
stones and the erosion of the region. 

CLIFFORD, William. Bichmond coal 
field, Virginia. 

Manchester Geol. Soc., Trans., voL 19, pp. 
326-353, pis. 1-5, pp. 431-433. 1888. 

Review by F. H. Newell, Geol. Magazine, 
III, vol. 6, pp. 137-1 39. 1889. 

General description of the structure and 
stratigraphy of the field, including numerous 
quotations from previous writers. Disousnon 
of the origin and extent of the ooal and coke, 
and relation of the coal measures to adjoining 
formations, accompanied by - maps and sec- 
tions at Clover Hill, Midlothian, Black Heath, 
and Deep Bun. 

COLEMAN, A. P. Mioroscopic petro- 
graphy of the drift of central Ontario. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., vol. 5, section 
IU, pp. 45-59, pis. 1, 2, 40. 1888. 

Abstract, Canadian Record Science, voL 2, 
p. 435, i p. 1887. 

Preceded by a brief general description of 
the drift in which the described rocks occur. 

COLLINS, J. H. On the Sudbury cop- 
per deposits. 

Geol. Soc, Quart. Jour., vol. 44, pp. 834- 
838. 1888. 

Includes brief description of geologic rela- 
tions. Discusses origin of the deposits and 
their relations to the igneous rooks. 

Colorado, age of Denver formation^ 
Cope. 
analyses of Leadville rocks and ores, 

HlLLKBRAND. 

Aspen Mountain, Brunton. Hbr- 

RiCK. Lakus. 
Aspen ore deposits, Sivbr, 
Boulder County veins, Van Dibst. 



DABTOET.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



51 



Ck>lorado— Continued. 

Batte Mountain; Eagle County, Ol- 

COTT. ' 
coals, A8HBURNER. NbWBERRY. 

coal field of Crested Butte, IjAKES. 
Cimarron land slide. Cross. 
classification of Middle Cretaceous, 

Eldridqe. 
Cretaceous, Eld ridge . Emmons, 

S. F. Ward. 
Cretaceous of Gunnison County, 

Hills. 
dinosauria of Denver beds, Cannon. 
Eagle County, Tilden. 
Elk Head coal, Chisolm. 
emptiye rQjDksfrom Caster County, 

Cross. 
emptioDs of Spanish Peaks region, 

Hills. 
fossil plants from Golden, Le Conts. 
gas in Pitkin County, Hills. 
geology of ore deposits. Lakes. 
geology and mining industry of Lead- 

ville, Emmons, S. F. 
glaciers in the Rocky Mountains, 

Emmons, S. F. 

hot springs formations, Comstock. 

infusorial earth in Denver, He adden. 
Jurassic, Cope. 

Jurassic and Carboniferous uncon- 
formities, Emmons, S. F. 

living glacier on Hague's Peak, 
Stone. 

Mesozofc of southern Colorado, Stev- 
enson. 

mineralogical notes, corundum 
schists, Smith, W. B. 

mountain npthrusts, Uinta, etc., 
White, C. A. 

Dorthwestern coal region, Hewitt. 

notes on Leadville, Ihlseng. 

oil fields, Newberry. 

oil fields of Fremont County, Ihl- 
seng. 

ore chutes of Iron Hill, Leadville, 
Blow. 

ore deposits, Emmons, S. F. 

OTns of Red Mountain region, 

SCHWARZ. 

Ouray County, Ebdzie. 

origin of ore deposits near Ouray, 
Endlich. 

paleontologic notes, Boulder, Stan- 
ton. 



Colorado — Continued. 

paramorphic origiu of certain miuer- 
ais, Cross. 

phonolite, Cross. 

primary quartz in basalt, Iddings. 

Quaternary of Denver basin, Cam- 
eron. 

relations of Laramie group. White, 
C.A. 

Rocky Mountains a field for original 
work, Hills. 

sandstone from Armejo quarry, an- 
alysis, Chatard. 

San Juan region, Ihlseng. 

structural relations of ore deposits, 
Emmons, S. F. 

Sylvanite mine, Eng. and Mining 
Jour. 

Tertiary, Cope. Emmons, S. F. 

Tertiaries of the Huerfauo River 
basin, Hills. 

Trinidad coal region, Lakes. 

upper Eocene lacustrine formations, 
Scott. 

vertebrate fauna of Puerco epoch. 
Cope. 

volcanic craters. Van Diest. 
Colorado Scientific Society, Proceed- 
ings, vol. 2. 

Boulder County veins, Van Diest. 

Cimarron landslide, Cross. 

Circulation of water in coal meas- 
ures, Gunnison Connty, Hills. 

Colorado ore deposits, Emmons. 

Elk Head anthracite, Chisolm. 

Natural gas in Pitkin County, Hills. 

Topaz and garnet in rhyolite. Cross. 

Mineralogical notes, Smith, W. B. 

Phonolite from Colorado, Cross. 

Paramorphic origin of certain min- 
erals. Cross. 

Infusorial earth in West Denver, 
Hadden. 

Paleontological notes, Stanton. 

Origin of fissure veins, Emmons, 
S. F. 

Glaciers in the Rocky Mountains, 
Emmons. 

Eruptive rocks from Custer County, 
Colorado, Cross. 

Notes on Aspen, Colorado, Emm>ns, 
S. F. 

Address of retiring president. Van 
Diest. 



52 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BI7LL.75r 



Colorado Scientific Society, Proceed- 
ings, voL 3, part 1— Continued. 
Colorado volcanic craters, Van 

DiKST. \ 

Eruptions of Spanish Peaks region, 
Hills, R. C. 

Quaternary of Denver basin. Can- 
non. 

Ores of Red Mountain district, 

SCHWARZ. 

Features of country about Denver, 

Colorado, Eldridge. 
Denver Tertiary formation; Cross. 
Tertiary Dinosauria found in Denver 

beds. Cannon. 
Tertiary beds of Huerfano River 

basin, Colorado, EEiLLS, R. C. 
Address: Field for original work in 

the Rocky Mountains, Hills, R. C. 

Colorado State School of Mines. Re- 
port of field work and analyses, 
1886. 
Iron resources of Colorado, Chau- 

VENET. 

Mining interests of San Juan region, 

IHLSENG. 

Oil fields of Fremont County, Ihl- 

SENG. 

Trinidad coal region. Lakes. 
Coal field of Crested Butte, Lakes. 

Biennial Report, 1886. 

Resources of Boulder County, Van 

DiEST. 

Aspen mining region. Lakes. 
Eagle County, Tilden. 
Annual Report, 1887. 



Notes on Leadville, Ihlseng. 
Developments at Leadville, Blow. 
Geology of Colorado ore deposits, 
Lakes. 
COLTON, Henry E. Notes on the to- 
pography and geology of western 
North Carolina— The Hiawasse Valley. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 839-851, plate. 1888. 

InclndeB incidental references to the lime- 
stones and quartzites. 

COMSTOCK, Theodore B. The fossil 
fuels of Illinois and their exploitation. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 44. p. 24. 4<^. 
1887. 
Economic. 

Notes on the region north of the 

Vermilion Lake district in British 
Columbia. 



COMSTOCK, Theodore B.— Continued. 
Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
le. pp. 109-111. 1887. 
Beferences to glacial featares. 

-A preliminary examination of the 
geology of western central Arkansas. 

Arkansas Q-eol. Surrey, Report for 1888, 
vol. 1, pp. 1-^20, 2 maps. 1888. 

Description of formations and stroctnre 
and incidental discnssions of equivalency, 
position, and origin of some of the members, 
relations of faults and flexures, and the 
genesis of ore deposits. 

Hot spring formations in Red Moun- 
tain district, Colorado ; a reply to the 
criticisms of Mr. Emmons. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol* 
17, pp. 261-264. 1889. 

Citations firom his own paper and from Em- 
mons's, comments and discussion of the status 
of the latter. 

Connecticut, ash bed at Meriden, Davis, 

W. M. 
faults near Meri den, Davis, W. M. 
fluviatile swamps of New England, 

Shalbr. 
fossil fishes and plants from Trias, 

Newberry. 
great bowlders, Hubbard. 
Hanging Hills, Chapin. 
intensity of metamorphism [near 

New Haven], Daxa, J. D. 
map of vicinity of New York City, 

Martin. 
structure of trap ridges, Davis, W. M, 
Taconic system of Emmons, Wal- 

COTT. 

trap riiges at Meriden, Chapin. 
traps of East Haven-Brantford re- 
gion, HOVEY. 

Trias, Chapin. Davis, W. M. 

Davis, C. H. S. 
traps of Connecticut Valley, Davis 

and Whittle. 
topographic development of Trias, 

Davis, W. M. 

COOK, George H. Archean or pri m i ti ve 
rocks. 

Qeol. Survey of New Jersey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 70-74. 1887. 

General description of the topop:raphic and 
structural features of the crystalline rocks of 
the Highlands of New Jersey ; introductory 
to Britten's report. 

[ ] Triassic. 

Qeol. Surrey New Jersey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 123-127. 1887. 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



53 



COOK, George H. — Continued. 

Beviewed, Science, vol. 9, pp. 595-596. 1887. 

Reviews Roger's theory of inclined deposi- 
tion and Rassdll's theory of continuity in 
deposition of the New Jersey and Conneoti* 
cut Valley areas. Discusses the occurrence 
and effects of faults, the relations of the ig- 
neous rocks in opposition to the theory of ex- 
trusion, and the structural relations of the 
New Jersey and Connecticut Valley areas. 
Postulates some working hypotheses for the 
study of the formation. 

[ ] Surface geology. 

Geol. Surrey of New Jersey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 127-129. 1887. 

Introductory to Merrill's report on the yel- 
low gravel; describes its distribution, char- 
acter, and relations to associated formations. 

[ ] Mining. 

G-eol. Surrey of New Jersey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 135-154. 1887. 

Describes some geologic features in several 
magnetite mines, and at the hematite mine on 
Marble Mountain, Warren County. 

[ ] Greensand marls. 

G-eol. Surrey of New Jersey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 154-210. 1887. 

Reprinted from the report of the State G^ 
ologist to the State Board of Agriculture in 
1876. Statements in regard to geographic ex- 
tent, geologic structure, thickness, age, com- 
position, clay marls, red sand bed, and use, and 
detailed descriptions of openings in the mid- 
dle and upper marl beds. 

r ] Geologic surveys. 



G-eol. Survey of New Jersey, Report of Ge- 
ologist for 1887, pp. 20-23. 1887. 

General description of the subdivisions and 
structure of the Archean, with an abstract of 
Britten's report on field work of 1887. Refer- 
enoe to the extension of the Cretaceous mem- 
bers locally known as the sand hills. 

— Artesian wells. 

G«ol. Survey of New Jersey, Report of Ge- 
ologist for 1887, pp. 25-27. 1887. 

Includes reference to wells in red sandstone 
near Hoboken, and through clay to gneiss at 
SayreviUe. 

— Beport of the subcommittee on Mes- 
ozoic. 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommlttee Reports, 1888, £, pp. 3-7. 

Am. Gteologist, voL 2, pp. 257-261. 1888. 

Referenoe to position and characteristics of 
theTmasand Cretaceous of the Eastern United 
States, absence of separable Jurassic, and use 
of twms gioup and series. Includes tables 
of opinions in regard to equivalency of Trias 
of New Jersey, Virginia, and North Carolina, 
and the Cretaceous and its subdivisions in 
Hrew Jeraey, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, 



COOEI, George H.— Continued. 

interior North America, and the Canadian 
Rocky Mountains. 

On the International Geologic Con- 
gress and our part in it as American 
geologists. . 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc, voL 87, 
pp. 169-177. 1889. 

Abstract, Science, vol. 12, pp. 92-93. 1888. 

Includes a brief general review of A merican 
geology, and a discussion of the principles of 
geologic classification and. nomenclature. 

Geological map of New Jersey, from 

original surveys. Scale, 5 miles to an 
inch. 1889. Atlas sheet No. 20. 34 by 
25 inches. 

Colored map with two cross-sections. Dif- 
fers from map published with 1882 report as 
follows : Wider extension of the larger coastal 
alluvial areas, outlying area of Cretaceous 
(Potomac?) near Monmouth Junction, Hud- 
son River slates area, and alteration in Tri- 
assic boundary near Clinton and Brookville, 
additional small volcanic areas near Beemer- 
ville, and in the Triassio region, several small 
orystalline limestone areas near Danville, 
northward extension of the First Watchung 
trap area, and many slight local corrections 
of boundary lines. 

[ ] Oir the Triassic or red sandstone 

rooks. 

Geol. Survey of New Jersey, Report for 1888, 
pp. 11-15. 1889. 

Statement of general characteristics of the 
formation, discussion of the occurrence of 
faults and expression of opinion in regard to 
the nature of the trap rocks. 

[ ] Artesian wells. 

Geol. Snrveyof New Jersey, Report for 1888, 
pp. 72-77. 1889. 

Gives records of 1,150-foot well at Atlantic 
City, 880-foot well at Sea Island City, 155-foot 
well near Marlton, and a 450-foot well in Jer- 
sey City. 

COOPER, J. G. Catalogue California 
fossils. 

Oalifomia, Seventh Report of the State 
Mineralogist, pp. 223-808. 1888. 

Compilation. References to stratigraphio 
positions. 

COPE, £. D. The formations of the 
Belly River of Canada. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 171-172. 1887. 

Abstract (with comments) of paper by 
George M. Dawson described in the bibliog- 
raphy for 1886. 

The Mesozoic and Cenozoic realms 

of the interior of North America. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 445-462. 1887. 



54 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BU1X.78L 



COPE, E. D.— Continued. 

Genera] review of the distribation, oharac- 
terifttics and eqoiralenoy of the several 
groups and their subdivisions and disoossion 
of their paleontolojicic and stratigraphic rd*- 
tions. Reviews Gilbert on glacial age of the 
Montana equns beds. 

Mr. Hill on the Cretaceous of Texas. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 460-470. 1887. 

Objects to the new nomenolatnre and dis- 
cnsses the probable equivalency of some of 
the groaps and labdivisions. 

[ T] [The International Congress of 

Geologists. ] 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 643-645. 1887. 

Discusses the desirability of a nniform 
system of eelors and nomenclature, and the 
probable general synchronism of the wider 
geologic subdivisions. Quotes Powell's letter 
on the subject and advances some objections 
to its recommendations. 

Synopsis of the vertebrate fauna of 

the Puerco series. 

Am. Phil. Soc, Trans., new series, vol. 16. 
pp. 298-361, pis. IV, V. 4°. 1888. 

Prefatory remarlcs, Am. Naturalist, vol. 
22, pp. 161-163. 1888. 

Preceded by a brief description of the ex- 
tent and general relations of the series. 

Mesozoic realm. 



International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Report, 1888, E, pp. 7-15. 
^ Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 261-268. 1888. 

B6sum6 of distribution, general relations, 
and characteristics of the several formations, 
and discussions of age and equivalency. 

— Report of the subcommittee on the 
Cenozoic (Interior). 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, G, p. 20. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 285-209. 1888. 

R68um6 of paleontologic and geologic char- 
acteristics of the members of the Cenozoic, 
and a discussion of their age, range, and 
equivalency. 

— Vertebrate fauna of the Puerco 
series. [Abstract.] 

Science, voL 11, p. 198, } p. 1888. 
Bead to National Academy of Sciences. 
Incidentally refers to position of Puerco 
beds. 

— Sketches of the Cascade Mountains 
of Oregon. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 22, pp. 996-1005. 1888. 

Scientific Am. Snpt. , voL 27, pp. 10081-10962, 
(No. 687.) 4°. 1889. 

Includes sketches of volcanic history of the 
region and description of some geologic fea- 
tures in the vicinity of Crater Lalce and in the 
eafion of the Des Chates. 



COPE, £. D.— Continued. 

The age of the Denver formation. 

Sdenc*, vol. 13, p. 290, f ooL 1889. 
Discussion of the bearing of Its mammalian 
remains. 

The yertebrate fauna of the Equns 

beds. 

Am. Naturalist, toL 38, pp. 161-16S. (Feb- 
roary number.) 1889. 

- List of species, desoription of new species 
from Washington, and brief disoossion of age 
of Equns beds. 

An intermediate Pliocene fauna. 



Am.NatnralUt,voL28,pp.253-25i. 1880. 

Notioesof oocarrenceof mammalian remains 
ftom Oregon and discussion of tiieir age ; also 
refers to age of some Floridian remains. 

Cornwall, Royal GIteologioal Society, 
Transactiona, voL 11. 
Copper mining at the Cove, New- 
foundland, Garland. 

COSTE, E. [Preliminary report on 
sheet 113, Ontario.] 

Oanada, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Snrvey, 
Beport, 1886, part A, pp. 20-22. 1887. 

Includes some general statements in regard 
to relations of igneous rocks penetrating the 
Arohean. 

COURTIS* W. M. The Animikie rocks 
and their vein phenomena as shovrn at 
Duncan Mine, Lake Superior. 

Am. Inst. BCining Engineers, Trans., voL 
15, pp. 671-677, plate. 1887. 

Describes the eruptive and clastic rocks 
passed through in a 994-foot drill hole. Gives 
partial analyses of some of the rocks and a 
section showing the structural relations. 

COWLAM, 6eor|i:e B. The extent and 
value of East Tennessee minerals. 

• 

Eng. and Mining Jonm., to1.45, pp. 19-21, 
40. 1888. 

General description of the ooal field and 
fossil ore belt. 

COX, £. T. [Salt deposits in Kansas, 
etc., and their relation to those of 
Petite Anse.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 7, p. 127, 
ip. 1888. 

Reference to thickness and position of the 
Kansas deposit, and statement of opinion in 
. regard to its age and the age of the Petite 
Anse beds. 

CRAGIN, F. W. Geological notes on 
the reunion south of the great bend of 
the Arkansas. 

Washbnm Ooll. Lab. , Bull. , voL 2, pp. 33-97. 
1889. 



DABTON,] 



RECORD OP OEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889, 



55 



CRAGIN, F. W.— Continued. 

Description of Mesozoics and discnssion of 
of the stratigrapbio range and relation of the 
Fermian-Triassic transition series. 

Contributions to the paleontology 

of the Plains, No. 1. 

Washburn OoU. Lab., Boll. , vol. 2, pp. 65-68. 
1889. 

Contains an incidental reference to the 
equivalency of a Kansas formation, for which 
the term ** Cheyenne sandstone" is suggested. 

CRAIG, W. Contributions to the geol- 
ogy and paleontology of the town- 
ships of Russell and Cambridge in Rus- 
sell, Ontario. Physiography and gen- 
eral geology. 

Ottawa Naturalist, vol 2, pp. 136-139. 1889. 
An account of the drifts and of the relations 
of Ordovician formations. 

CRANDALL, A. R. Report on the 
geology of Elliott County. 

G«ol. Survey of Kentucky, Report on 
Geology of Elliott County, by Crandall, pp. 
5-16. 7 plates, 2- map^. {1887!]. 

Describes topographic features of the con- 
glomerate, the exposures of x>eridotite and 
the occurrence aud variations of the coal 
strata. Accompanied by geologic maps and 
columnar seotidhs. 

Notes on the Elliott County dike, 

eastern Kentucky. 

Geol. Survey of Kentucky, Report on 
Geology of Elliott County, pp. 17-19, map. 
[1887 f J. 

Briefly describes the localities and discusses 
the religions of the intrusions to the structure 
of the region. 

Report on the Pound Gap region. 

Geol. Survey of Kentucky, Reports on the 
soudieastem Kentucky coal field, 1887, pp. 1- 
29, maps, plates. 

Describes structure of Pine Mountain and 
iron ores and coal-measures of Pound Gap 
region. Gives table of thicknesses of beds 
fkrom upper Silurian to coal-measures in Pine 
Mount«in and^n western Kentucky, discusses 
the age of the Pine Mountain fault and its 
relations to topography and drainage, and re- 
views the stratigraphy and geologic history of 
Kentucky and of the Pine Mountain region. 
Accompanied by map of the Appalachian coal 
field. 

CRESSON, Hilbome T. Early man in 
the Delaware Talley. 

Boston Soc. Nat. SUst., Proc, vol. 24, pp. 
141-150. 1889. 

Includes references to the relations of the 
drift deposits in the valley of the lower Dela- 



CRESSON, Hilbome T.—Continued. 

Remarks upon a chipped implement 

fonud in ujodified drift on the east fork 
of the White River, Jackson County, 
Indiana. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc, vol 24, pp. 
150-152. 1889. 

Includes a brief discussion of the nature 
and h'story of the deposit by G. F. Wright. 

Cretaceous (including Potomac forma- 
tion). 
Alabama, Tuscaloosa formation, Mc- 

Tuscaloosa, Tombigbee, and Alabama 

rivers, Smith and Johnson. Mo 

Geb. 

Arkansas, northern limits of Cretaceons, 

Hay, O. p. 

events in North American Cretaceous 

history, Hill,R.T. 
Jura, Neocomian, and chalk, Marcou. 
Pike County, Branner. 
events in Cretaceous history, Hill, 

R.T. 
Portland cement, Branner. 
relations of southern to eastern Cre- 
taceous, Hill, R. T. 
southwestern Arkansas, Hill, R. T. 
Trinity formation, Hill, R. T. 
west central, Comstock. 
Brazil f Sergipe-Alago^s region, Bran- 
ner. 
California^ Becker. Bowers. But- 
ton. Goodyear. Le Conte. 
Irelan. Jackson. Weber. 
White, C. A. Whiting. 
catalogue of fossils. Cooper. 
petrographic description, Schuster. 
Canadaj branches of Saskatchewan, 
Panton. 
Belly River region. Cope. 
borings in Manitoba, Dawson, G. M. 
Caribou gold district, Bowman. 
Cascade anthracite basin, Dawson, 

G.M. 
coal in valley of Bow River, Dodge. 
earlier Cretaceous of the Northwest, 

Dawson. G. M. 
floras of the Northwest, Dawson, 

J. W. 
fossils from coast of British Colum- 
bia, Whiteaves. 
Laramie plants, Dawson, J. W. 
Mount Stephen, McConnell. Wal- 

COTT. 

northern Alberta, etc., Tyrrell 



56 



EECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1^7 TO 1889, 



[BULL. 75. 



Cretaceous — Con tinned. 
Canada— Continued. 

northern part of the Dominion, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

plants from Yancouver Island, 
Dawson, G. M. Dawson, J. W. 

relations of British North American 
plants, Drummond. 

Bed Biver valley, Manitoba, Mc- 
Charles. 

Bocky Mountain near the 51st paral 
lei, McCONNBLL. 

Yancouver invertebrate fossils, 
White, C. A. 

woods and plants from western Can- 
ada, Dawson. 

Yukon expedition, Dawson, G. M. 
Colorado^ Classification of middle Cre- 
taceous, Eldridgk. 

coals, Newberry. 

coal field of Crested Butte, Lakes. 

Denver region, Cross. Eldridge. 

Elk Head coal, Chisolm. 

fossil plants from Golden, Lesquer- 

EUX. 

field for research in the Rocky 

Mountains, Hills. 
geology of Colorado ore deposits. 

Lakes. 
Gunnison County, Hills. 
Huerfano River basin. Hills. 
iron resources of Colorado, Chau- 

VENET. 

Leadville, Ihlseng. 

Mesozoic of southern Colorado, Stev- 
enson. 

Mountain upthrusts, Uinta, etc.. 
White, C.A. 

northwestern coal region, Hewitt. 

oil fields, Newberry. 

oil fields of Fremont County, Ihl- 
seng. 

Paleontologic notes, Boulder, Stan- 
ton. 
Pitkin County, Hills. 
Spanish Peaks region, Hills. 
Trinidad coal region. Lakes. 
Dakota, Black Hills, Carpenticr. 
Crosby. 
Pembina Mountain, Upham. 
Indian Territoryy Trinity formation, 

Hill, R. T. 
lowaj Am. Geologist. White, C. A. 
central Iowa, Keyes. 
pockets containing clay at Clinton, 
Farnswortii. 



Cretaoeons— Continued. 
KansaSj geology oi^ lectnre, Hat. 
geology of southwestern Kansas, St. 

John. 
history of geologic work, Hat and 

Thompson. 
horizon of Dakota lignite. Hat, B. 
note on a remarkable fossil, Hat. B. 
paleontology of the plains, Cragin. 
region south of the great bond of 

the Arkansas, Cragin. 
salt deposits, Hay, B. Cox. 

KentuoJcyj Jackson purchase region, 
Loughridgb. 

Louisiana, iron region of northetn, 
Johnson. 
salt deposits, Petite Anse, Bolton. 

Cox. POMEROT. 

Maryland, age of Potomac formation, 
Ward. Marsh. 

Albirupean, Hbilprin. Lewis. 
Uhler. 

Anne Arundel and Prince George's 
counties, Clark. 

Eocene and its associates, Uhler. 

Potomac woods and lignites, Knowl- 
ton. • 

Potomac valley, McGee. 

Sauropoda from the Potomac forma- 
tion, Marsh. 

southwestern Maryland, Brtan. 

three formations of the Middle Atlan- 
tic slope, McGbb. 

Massachusetts, Martha's Vineyard , 

Shaler. 
Mexico, Siena Mojada, Chism. 

Baja California, Lindgren. 

Lower Cretaceous, White, C. A. 

Valley of Mexico, Chism. 
Montana^ Gallatin region, Hayden. 

Great Falls coal basin, Newberry. 

Iron Butte, Calvin. 
Minnesota, county geofogy, Upham. 
Winchkll, N. H. 

artesian wells. Hall, C. W. 

Natural gas wells, Winchell,N. H. 
Neltraska, soils. Hicks. 

report, division of glacial geology, 
Chamberlin, T. C. 

well at Lincoln, Am. Geologist. 
Nevada, Becker. 

New Jersey, Cook. Whitfield. Mc- 
Gee. 

artesian wells, Cook. 

green sand marls, Cook. 



DABTOH.] 



BECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



57 



OretaceouB — Continued. 
New Jcr«cy— -Continued. 
Fossiliferous beds near Clementown, 

WOOLMAN. 

geologic mapi Cook. 

map of vioinity of New York city, 

Martin. 
resemblance to Gulf States, Hill, 

R.T. 

three formations of the middle Atlan- 
tic slope, McGbe. 

vicinity of New York, Britton. 
New.MexicOj vertebrate fauna of the 
Puerco epoch, Copk. 

Mesozoic of northern New Mexico, 
Stevenson. 

Mesozoic of New Mexico, Marcou. 

origioal locality of Gryphsea Pitcheri, 
Marcou. 
New York, artesian well, Woodhaven, 
Bryson. 

boriug on Staten Island, Britton. 

leaf in sandstone in drift, Staten 
Island, UoLLiCK. 

Long Island, Brtson. Dana, J. D. 

overlap on Archean on Staten Island, 
Newberry. 

Staten Island, Britton. Hollick. 
Nomenclature and olassificationy classifi- 
cation of middle Cretaceous, 
Eldridoe. 

equivalency of American, New- 
berry. 

report of subcommittee on Mesozoic, 
International Congress of Geolo- 
gists, Cook. Cope. 

synojisis of Laramie flora, Ward. 
Lesqubreux. 

Mesozoic realm, Cope. 

positionof Ripley group, White, C. A. 

relations of Laramine group. White, 
C.A. Ward. Dawson, J.W. 
North Carolina, age of Potomac forma- 
tion, Ward. 

three formations of Middle Atlantic 
Slope, McGee. 

Mesozoic at Weldon, Ward. 
Oregon, western, Dutton. Lang. 

invertebrate fossils, White, C.A. 
Pennsylvania, rivers and valleys, Davis, 

W.M. 
South America, Cerro de Pasco, Peru, 
Hodges. 

8ergipe-Alago&s basin, Brazil, Bran- 

NER. 



CretaceouB— Continued. 
Texas, geology of. Hill, R. T. 
Burnet County, Walker. 
building stones of eastern Texas, 

Penrose. 
coal of Bio Grande region. White, 

C.A. 
events in North American Cretaceous 

history. Hill, R. T. 
Fauna der oberturonen Kreide, Hill. 

RdMER. 

Hays County, Pond. 
Haldeman County, J. T. W. 
Hill on, Cope. 

iron regions of eastern Texas, John- 
son. 
Lower Cretaceons of south west Texas, 

White, C.A. 
Mitchell County, Broadiiead. 
Neozoic geology. Hill, R. T. 
new species of fossils, Hill, R. T. 
occurrence of Macraster Texan us. 

Hill, R. T. 
origin of certain limestones, Hill, 

R.T. 
original locality of Gry pha» Pitcheri, 

Marcou. 
Paleontology, Hill, R. T. 
Permian of Texas, White, C. A. 
resemblance to New Jersey, Hill, 

R.T. 
Rio Grande Valley, Owen. 
Shumard on, Hill, R. T. 
southern Texas, Jermy. Tait. 
story of Colorado River, Hill, R. T. 
Texas section, Hill, R. T. 
south central Texas, Owen. 
western Texas, Cummings. Hill, 

R. T. Streeruwitz. 

Utah, Laramie, White, C. A. 

Virginia, age of Potomac formation, 
Ward. Marsh. 
three formations of the middle Atlan- 
tic slope, MgGee. 

Washington, Puget group. White, C. A. 
invertebrate fossils, White, C. A. 

Wyoming, geologic history of Yellow- 
stone Park, Hague. 
Laramie, White, C. A. 
skull of CeratopsidsB, Marsh. 
report of Territorial Geologist, 

RiCKETTS. 

CROSB7, W. O. Geology of the outer 
islands of Boston Harbor. 



58 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



f BULL. 75. 



CROSBY, W. O.— Continued. 

.Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Froc., voL 23, pp. 
450-457. 18B8. 

Description of the relations of diftbase 
sheets and dikes to slates, and discoasion of 
structure, relations of the diabase, evldoioe of 
a fault, and cause of relative position and trend 
of the islands. Reference to drifts. 

Geology of the Black Hills, Dakota. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., I^roc, vol. 23, pp 
488-517, voL 24, p. 11. i p. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Jonrn. Sci., 3d series, vol. 
86, p. 153, i p. 1888. 

Sketch of geology and description of various 
features of the suveral formations. Discus- 
sion of relative ages of the crystalline rooks ; 
the relation of the metamorphic conglomerate 
and the deforraatioii of its pebbles; the cor. 
relations of the Archean rocks with those 
elsewhere ; evidence of the existence of lime- 
stone in the Archean; origin, extent, rela- 
tions, and age of the granites, volcanic rocks, 
mineral deposits, and superficial formations; 
conditions of deposition and formations in the 
West between the Cambrian and Carbonifer- 
ous, relations of Paleozoic and Mesozoic; age, 
history, and relations of Black Hills uplift, 
and of the red beds and subsequent forma- 
tions. 
Qnartzites and siliceous concretions. 

Sci. Am. Snpt., vol. 26, pp. 10466-10468, folio. 
No. 655. 1888. 

From Technology Quarterly. 

Description of relations of Potsdam sedi- 
ments in the Black Hills and discussion of 
the nature and origin of the included quartz- 
ite masses and on siliciflcation in general. 

and BARTON, G. H. On the great 

dikes at Paradise, near Newport. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Froc, voL 23, pp. 
825-330. 1887. 

Gives an account of the geologic features of 
the region, the relations of which are found 
to be much simpler than fcrmeiiy supposed; 
the "hornblende schist" of Dale proving on 
examination by Merrill to be an intrusive 
rock, probably an altered diorite.> 

CROSS, Whitman. Petrography. 

Geology and Mining Industry of Lead- 
▼ille, Colorado, by S. F. Emmons, IT. S. 6eol. 
Survey, Mon., vol. 12, pp. 319-362, 2 plates. 
1886. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, p. 62, i p. 
1887. 

Describes the ernptives of the Leadville 
region, and the Henry Mountain laccolites. 
Discusses age, succession, composition, and 
character of the rocks. 

— On the occurrence of topaz and 
garnet in lithophyses of rhyolite. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol. 2, part 2, pp. 
61-70. 1887. 



CROSS, Whitman— Continued. 

Pqblished in 1886. Am. Joar. SoU, 3d series, 
voL 81, pp. 482-438. 

The Cimarron landslide, Jnljr, 1886. 

Oolorado Sd. Soc, Proc, voL 2, part 8, pp. 
lie-126. 1887. 

Describes geologic featnrea of the vicinity 
and topognq>bio oluuigesMae to the slide. 
Discusses its caose and similarity to other 
slides. 

Note on phonolite from Colorado 

[El Paso Connty]. 

Colorado Sd. See., Froe., voL 2; pp. 167- 
170. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Natnralist, voL 28, pp. 171- 
172, i p. (Febmaiy No.). 1889L 

Petrographic description and analyses. 

[Observations in regard to the para- 

morphic origin of cer4iain minerals.] 

Oolorado Sol. Soc, Froc, vol. 2, pp. 182- 
183. 1888. 

Befers to instances observed in Custer 
County, Colorado. 

On some eraptive rocks from Custer 

County, Colorado. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol. 2, pp. 228- 
250. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Natnralist, vol. 23, p. 171, i 
p. (February No.). 1889. 

Description of petrography and occnrrence 
of rhyolites, trachytes, syenite, peridotite, 
augite-diorite, and sanadiue-bearing andesite. 
Definition of lithologic terms. 

The Denver Tertiary formation. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, Vcd. 37, pp.261- 
279. 1889. 

Abstract^ Oolorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol. 3, 
pp. 119-133. 1889. 

Description of distribution, stratigraphy, 
composition, and general relations of the for- 
matioD, and discussion of stratigraphio and 
paleontologic evidence of its age and history. 

CUMMINS, W. T. The Carboniferous 
of western Texas and its relation to 
the Cretaceous. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 138, ^ p. 1888. 
Reference to its barrenness in coal and to 
its conformable overlap by the Cretaceous. 

Mining districts in El Paso County 

[Texas]. 

Geol. and Soi. Bull., voL 1, No. 2, f col., 4°. 
1888. 

Geologic relations of granites and porphy- 
ries to Cretaceous and Carboniferout* lime- 
stones. 

The Carboniferous formation in 

Texas. 

Geol. and Sci. Bull., vol. 1, No. 3, 1^ col., i9, 
1888. 



BABTOff.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



59 



CUMBfflNS, W. T.— Oontinned. 

Beferenoe to extent, relations, and strati- 
graphic range. 

Report of Geologist for northern 

Texas. 

Texas, G«<d. and Mineralogioal Surrey, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 4&-53. 1889. 

Abetiaot, OeoL and 8oi. Boll., voL 1, Nov., 
1888, \ coL ; Jan., 1889, \ col., 4o. 

Notes on Carlxmiferoas coals and strati- 
gn^hy in northern central Texas. 

CURTICE, Cooi>er. Oriskauy drift near 
Washington^ District of Columbia. 



CXJRTICII. Cooper— Continued. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 223-'i!25. 1 889. 
Calls attention to occurrence uf foHHilifer* 
oas pebbles in the Potomac foriiiatiun at 
Monnt Vernon and near Alexandria. 

CXJSHINa, H. P. Notes on the Beroa 
grit in northeastern Ohio. 

Am. Assoc. Adr. Science, Froc, voL 36, 
pp. 213-215. 1888. 

Gives stratigraphic sections at several lo- 
calities. Description of extent and n-lations 
and discussion of equivalency of the beds, 
especially of the sandstone north of Warren. 



D. 



Dakota School of Mines, Report on 
Black HilU. 
Geology of the Black Hills, Car- 

FBNTER. 

Mineral resources of the Black Hills, 
Cakpknter. 

Dakota, beaches of glacial Lake Agassiz, 
Upham. 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

continuance of Lake Cheyenne, 

TODP. 

Cretaceous, Upham. Ward. Hill, 
R. T, 

fossil plants and prairies, Lbibkrg. 

geology of Black Hills, Carpenter. 
Crosby. 

glacial boundary in southeast Da- 
kota, Wright. 

glacial geology, Chamberlin. 

granites. Halt., C. W. 

great primordial quartzite, Winch- 
ell, N. H. 

green quartzite, Todd. 

mineral resources of the Black Hills, 
Carpenter. 

ore 'deposits of Black Hills, Car- 
penter. 

Quaternary of southern Dakota, 

Chamberlin. 
Missouri River, Broadhf.ad. 

quartzite and siliceouH concretions, 

Black Hills, Crosby. 

Tertiary, Cope. 

terraces of the Missouri, Todd. 

DALIa, William H. Notes on the geol- 
ogy of Florida. 

Am. Jonr. Sol., 3d series, voL 34, pp. 161-170. 
1887. 



DALL, William H. — Continued. 

Describes the extent of tho several snper- 
ficial and Tertiary formations and discusses 
their faunal distribution ami eqnivaleDcy, and 
the synchronism of post-Cretaceous forma- 
tions in generaL Calls attention to many 
rock outcrops and new fosniliferous localities, 
and to a series of meridional flexures crossing 
the Caloosahatchee River. 

[On the faunal relations of the for- 
mations of the Tertiary.] 

International Congress of Gi-eologists, Am. 
Committee Eeports, 1888, F., p. 16, i p. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 282. 1888. 

Discussion of basis on which Tertiary 
should be subdivided. 

DANA, Edward S. Contributions to 
the petrography of the Sandwich Isl- 
ands. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 441-467, 
pi. XIV. 1889. 
Abstracts, Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 522- 
633, 1 p. 1889. Nature,vol.40,p. 189, mines. 
1889. 

Petrographic descriptions of lavas. In- 
cludes an account of volcanic stalactites and 
discussion of their origin. 

DANA, James D. Volcanic action. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33. pp. 102-115. 
1887. 

Discusses causes and results of volcanic 
action and ar6sum^and discussion of the phe- 
nomena of £ilauea, Vesuvius, the recent New 
Zealand eruptions, and other instances. 

[ T] The origin of mountain ranges 

considered experimentally, structur- 
ally, dynamically, and in relation to 
their geological history, by T. Mellard 
Reade [etc.]. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 33, pp. 240-242. 
1887. 



60 



BECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75. 



DANA, James D. — ContinnecL* 

A brief statement of the theory and a re- 
view of its application to continental uplift 
and the Appalachian trough. 

On Taconic rocks aad stratigraphy, 

with a geological map of the Tacouic 
region ; part 2, the middle and north- 
ern part. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 8d series, voL 88, pp. 270-276 
302-419, pi. 11. 1887. 
i Continued from vol. 29, p. 443, 1885.] 
Describes the rooks and a series of sections 
across the region, and discusses the struct- 
ural and stratigraphic relations, distribution, 
and equivalency of the limestones, schists, 
and qnartzites. In a supplement entitled 
** Tue views of Prof. Emmons on the Taconic 
system," reviews Hnnt's " The Taconic ques- 
tion restated, " pp. 412-419. 

[ T] Report on the geology of New 

Jersey for 1886. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 8d series, vol. 34, p. 71, f p. 
1887. 

Abstract of Britten's report on the Archean 
and discussion of the use of the term Huro- 
nian. 

[ ] Geology of Long Island. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 153-155. 
1887. 

Abstract and review of F. J. H. MerriU's 
paper described in the bibliography for 1886. 
Discusses the character of the drift ridges, 
the identification of the Cretaceous and Ter- 
tiary, the uplift of the preglacial formations 
by the advancing edge of the ice sheet, and 
the cause of the deep bays in the north shore 
of the island. 

[ T] A pot-hole of remarkable size in 

Archbald, Pennsylvania. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 3d series, vol. 34, p. 489. 
1887. 
Description, and discussion of its origin. 

History of the changes in theJM^onnt 



Loa craters ; part i, Kilanea. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 15-34, 
pp. 218-228, 282-289, pis. i, IV, V. 1888. 

Abstract, Nature, vol. 37, p. 358, 17 lines. 
1888. 

Includes discussion of the causes and rela- 
tions of the changes, the mobility of the lavas, 
the eruptive and crater characteristics of a 
basalt volcano, size of the Kilauea conduit, 
and the conditions Involved in the various 
phenomena occurring between the eruptious. 

[ ] Gradual variation in intensity of 

metamorphism. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 82-83, f 
p. 1888. 

Kefers to illustrative localities west of New 
Haven, and discusses the occurrence and ori- 



DANA, James D. — Con tinned. 

gin of included masses of granite in that re- 
gion. 

[ ] Fossils of Littleton, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 3d series, vol. 35, p. 258^ ^ p. 
1888. 

Notice of their reference to the Niagara 
group by Hitoboook in 1884. 

History of changes in the Monnt 

Loa craters, part iii, eraptives of Ki- 
lanea and Monnt Loa. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 3d series, vol. 36, pp. 90-112, 
167,175. 1888. 

Discussion of the characteristics and causes 
of eruption, metamorphism as an effect of vol- 
oaidb conditions, the origin of the form of 
Mount Loa, relations of Kilauea to Mount 
Loa, and the contrast between volcanoes of 
the Mount Loa and Vesuvius types. 

History of th^ changes in the Monnt 

Loa craters, part u, Mokuaweoweo. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series. voL 36, pp. 14-32, 
pi. 1,81-90. 1888. 

History of eruptions, etc., and discussion of 
times and time intervals, and the nature and 
causes of the ordinary activity within the 
summit crater. 

Brief history of Taconic ideas. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 36, pp.410- 
427. 1888. 

And r6sum6 of present knowledge of the 
relations in the Taconic region. 

[On the use of the term " Taconic."] 

International Congress of Groologists, Am. 
Oonunittee Eeports, 1888, B, pp. 8-9. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 198-199. 1888. 

Discussion, of its applicability to lower Pal- 
eozoic formations. 

[On the subdivisions, nomenclature, 

distinctive features, and origin of some 
members of the Archean, origin of Ser- 
pentine, and the use of terms '^Ta- 
conic," ** Ordovician," and *' Cam- 
brian."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Axn. 
Committee Eeports, 1888, A, pp. 53-55. 

Recent observations of Mr. Frank S. 



Dodge, of the Hawaiian Government 
Survey, on Halema'uma'u and its de- 
bris cone. 

Jim. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 48-50. 
1889. 

Evidence of recent elevation of the cone 
and some other minor changes in the crater. 

— Points in the geological history of 



the islands Maui ana Oahu. 



DASTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



61 



DANA, James D. — Continaed. 

Am. Jonr. Sci.,"3d series, vol. 37, pp. 81-103. 
pis. m, IV. 1889. 

Description and disonssion of topographic 
and geologic relations, discussion of geologic 
history, volcaniam and evidence of subsi- 
dence. Statement of opinion in regard to 
Darwin's theory of coral island formation. 

On the origin of the deep troaghs 

of the Oceanic depression. Are any of 
volcanic origin? 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 192-202, 
pL vn. 1889. 

Beview of distribution and relations of the 
deep Oceanic troughs.- Accompanied by a 
bathyraetric map. 

The name Silurian in geology. 

Popular Science Monthly, voL 38, p. 276, 
2 p. 1889. 

Discussion of nomenclature of the Silurian 
and Ordovician, and suggestion of term " Or- 
dovician " for the ** upper Silurian." 

]3ARTON, Nelson H. Bibliography of 
North American geology for 1886. 

IT. S. Geol. Snnreyi Bull., vol.7, pp. 343-377, 
No. 44. 1887. 

On the great lava flows and intras- 



ive trap-sheets of the Newark system 
in New Jersey. 

Am. Jonr. Sol., 3d series, vol. 30, pp. 134-139. 
1889. 

Discussion of characteristics of extrusive 
and intrusive masses, and an account of the 
nature and relations of the traps of the New 
Jersey region. 

North American geology for 1886. 

Smithsonian Institution, Eeport, 1886-'87, 
Part 1, pp. 189-229. 1889. 
(Jlassified abstracts of papers. 

DARWIN, Charles. The structure and 
distribution of coral reefs, 3d edition, 
with an appendix by T. G. Bonney, p. 
344. New York. In89. 

Davenport Academy of Natural Sci- 
ences, Proceedings, voL 5» part 1. 
A defense of onr local geology, Bar- 
kis. 
Rockfort shales of Iowa, Webster. 

DAVIS, Charles H. S. The Catopterus 
gracilis. 

Meriden Sci. Assoc, Trans., vol. 2, pp. 1^ 
22. 1887. 

Beroarks on the occurrence of fish remains in 
the Trias, and a description of the locality at 
little Falls, Connecticut 

DAVIS, liVilliam Morris. Instruction in 
geological investigation. 



DAVIS, William Morris— Continued. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 810-825. 1887. 

In 4i8oassing some experiences with his 
field classes, describes dike contacts in the 
quarry at Somerville, Massachusetts, and 
evidences of a former higher level of ttie sea 
about Boston. 

[Results of a study of the mechan- 
ical origin of the Triassic monocllnnl 
in the Connecticut valley. ] 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc, vol. 23, pp. 
339-341. 1887. 

Beviews the various theories and advances 
a hypothesis to account for tlie monoclinal 
attitude. This paper antedates the one on 
the same subject described in the 1886 bibli- 
ography. 

[ ] The origin of mountain ranges, 

considered experimentally, structur- 
ally, dynamically, and in relation to 
their geological history. By T. Mol- 
lard Reade. London. 

Science, vol. 10, p. 139. 1887. 

States condition of present opinions on the 
subject, and briefly relates and reviews the 
author's theory. 

The classification of lakes. 

Science, vol. 10, pp. 142-143. 1887. 

Discusses the formation of lakes in the de- 
velopment of drainai;e systems, and the ef- 
fects of lava flows and glacial incursions. 

The ash bed at Meriden and its 



structural relations. 

Meriden Sci. Assoc, Trans. , vol. 3, pp. 23- 
30. 1888. 

Brief notice of the occurrence of the 
ash-bod; description of contacts of trap with 
overlying sediments in Lamentation Mount- 
ain and of West Kock range, New Haven, 
and the structural relations in the Meriden 
region, and sketch of the history of volcanic 
extrusion, and the mechanism of the uplift 
and faulting of the Newark formation of the 
Couneoticut valley. 

[ ] Geographic methods in geologic 

investigation. 

National Greogr. Mag., vol. 1, pp. 11-26. 
1888. 

Discussion of the status of geographic sci- 
ence and the genetic relations of topographic 
features. Includes references to structure of 
the Newark formation of the Connecticut 
valley, base levels in New Jersey and in 
eastern Pennsylvania, the relations of to. 
pography and drainage to structure and up 
lift in the Appalachian region and elsewhere, 
and conditions affecting waterfalls, instanced 
by some in northeastern Pennsylvania. 



62 



BECOBD OF aEOLOGT FOB 1867 TO 1889. 



IBULL..7S. 



DAVIS, William Morris— Continued. 
[ ] The topographic map of New Jer- 
sey. 

Science, voL 12. pp. 206-207. 1888. 

Calls attention to topographic flMtnna «s 
preMing geologio relations or suggesting 
gcologio problems: Sabmerged moatbs of 
streams along coast, conrse and termination 
of ridges in the Newark region, fVaotare sep- 
arating Archean highlands from lowlands of 
softer sediments, and some relations ot the 
preglacial Passaic drainage. 

The structure of the Triassio forma-' 

tion of the Connecticut valley. 

IT. S. Geol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
FowtU, 1885-'86, pp. 45S-490, pi. 52. 1887. 

Abstract, Am. Greologist, voL 4, pp. 112-113. 
1880. 

Description and discussion of stratigraphy 
and the stractural relations and character- 
istics of the igneous members, and a discus- 
sion of the mechanical origin of the Triassic 
monocline, with its faults and flexures. 

The faults in the Triassic formation 

near Meriden, Connecticut. 

Harvard OoUegt, Mns. Oomp. Zool. Bull., 
vol. 16, pp. 61-87, pis. 1-5. 1880. 

Detailed description of the relations of 
traps and sandstones, and structural relations 
in the Meriden-New Britain region. Elastra- 
ted by sketch maps and cross-sections. 

Topographic development of the 

Triassic formation of the Connecticut 
valley. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 423-434. 
1880. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, voL 36, 
p. 573, feci. 1800. 

Description of structural features in the 
Meriden region, discussion of the cause and 
significance of the eastward deflection of the 
lower Connecticut, and the orographic rela- 
tions and topographic history of the Connec- 
ticut valley region, and comparison of some 
of its stages with topography of fault sys- 
tems in the Great Basin and in China. 

— The glacial origin of cliffs. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 3, pp. 14-18. 1880. 

Discussion of the relations of clifl* and talus 
slopes and their modification by glaciation, 
instancing those of the Newark regions of 
New Jersey and the Connecticut valley. 

Methods and models in geographic 

teaching. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 566-583. 1880. 

Abstract, Johns Hopkins Univ., Oircnlars, 
voL 8, p. 62, i p, 4°. 1880. 

Includes a general discussion of various 
types and stages of topographic development. 

[ ] A river pirate. 



DAVIS, William Morris — Continued. 

Sdtnce, voL 18, pp. 108-100. 1889. 

Desoribea the topographio relations of some 
drainage features in the sontheaatem comer 
of Pennsylvania and discnssea their history. 

[ ] The ioe age in North America and 

its bearing upon the Mitiquity of roan. 
[By G. F. Wright.] 

Soienc«, voL 14, pp. 118-110. 1880. 
A general review of the work. 

The contoured map of Massachusetts. 

Science, vol. 14, pp. 422-423, | p . 1889. 

A general review of the more characteristic 
topographic features of the State and somo 
suggestions in regard to their geologic his- 
tory. 

The rivers and valleys of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

National Oeogr. Mag., voL l,pp. 183-253. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. G-eolgist, yol. 5, pp. 80-61, $ p. 
1801. .. 

General description of salient topographic 
and geologic features, sketch of geologic his- 
tory, exposition of conceptions of stages of 
development of drainage systems in general, 
and discussion of the genesis, history, ^nd 
relations of the drainage of Pennsylvania. 

and "WHITTLE, Charles Livy. The 



intrusive and extrusive Triassic trap 
sheets of the Connecticut valley. 

Harvard Oollege, Mns. Oomp. Zool., Bull., 
vol . 16, pp. 00-138, pi. S. 1 880. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, p. 769, 6 
lines. 1800. 

An account of the general features of intru- 
sive and extrusive sheets in Connecticut and 
the palisade sheet in New Jersey, and detailed 
description of the more important localities. 
Illustrated by maps and sections. 

DAWSON, George M, Report on a 
geological examination of the northern 
part of Vancouver Island and adjacent 
coasts. 

Canada, Gi-eol. and Nat. Hist. Surrey, 
Report, 1886, part B, pp. 1-107, plates. 1887. 
Map No. 1 in atlas. 

Abstract, Greol. Magazine, in, vol. 6, pp. 
130-133. 1880. 

Description of Cretaceous, Triassic, vol- 
canics, granites, and drifts, and discussion of 
their distribution, relations, equivalency, 
geologic history, the contact relations of the 
granites and the existence of Carboniferous 
and Permian. Accompained by a coloi'ed 
geologic map. 

Notes to accompany a geological 

map of the northern portion of the 
Dominion of Canada east of the Kocky 
Mountains. 



DABTON.l 



JEIECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



63 



DAVIS; William Morris— Continaed. 

Canada, Gteol. and Nat. Hist. Surrey y 
Report, ] 886, part R, pp. 92, colored map. 1887. 

Abstract, Geol. Magazine, in, toI. 6, pp. 
137-138. 1880. 

Includes a discuaaioQ of the charaoteristiofi, 
eqaivalency, age, range, stmctnre, distribu- 
tion, and relations of the various formations 
and areas, and of the direction of ice move- 
ment in the glaciid period. 

' — On the Canadian Bocky Moantains, 
with special reference to that part of 
the Range between the 49th parallel and 
the headwaters of the Red Deer River. 

Canadian Record of Science, vol. 2, pp* 
S86-300. 1887. 

Abstract, without geology, British Assoc. 
JLdv. Sci., Report of Uie 56th meeting, 1886, 
j>p. 638-639. 

General sketch of topographic and geologic 
:feature«, constituting an abstract of his paper 
in tile Canadian G^L' Survey Beport, vol. 1, 
3iew series, and described in the 1886 biblio- 
graphy. 

On certain borings in Manitoba and 



lie Northwest Territory. 

Canada, Royal Soc., Trans., vol. 4, Section 
IV, pp. 85-99. 1887. 

Abstract, G-eol. Bftagasine, 3d decade, vol. 
4, pp. 278-289. 1887. 

Description of beds passed through at 
Bosenfield Station, ^Rat Creek, Solsgirth, 
Grenfel Station, McLean Station, Begins, 
Belle Plain Station, Langevin Station, 
Cassills, and Gleishen Station, and discussion 
of the equivalency of some of the strata, 
the thinning of some of the Paleozoic forma- 
tions toward the region, the relation of the 
drift deposits, and tJie stratigraphy of the 
Cretaceous at the Langevin hole. 

Note on the Cascade Anthracite 
l)a8m, Rooky Mountains. 

Am. G^eologist, voL 1, pp. 332-333. 1888. 

General description of the trough and 
reference to the horizon and thickness of the. 
Cretaceous in that region. 

— The geological observations of the 
Yukon expedition, 1887. 

Science, vol. 11, pp. 185-186. 1 888. 

Description of the geology of the Coast 
Banges and of the region eastvrard, to, and 
including the Bocky Mountains, in west 
central British Columbia. Includes refer- 
ences to rock series firom granites to Miocene, 
relations of superficial deposits and evidence 
of glacial action, terraces, striation, and great 
Toloanio ash deposit. 

— • Recent observations on the glacia- 
tion of British Columbia and adjacent 
regions. 



DAVIS, William Morris— Continued. 

Geol. Magazine, 3d decade, vol. 6, pp. 347- 
350, ltj88. 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 279-253. 1889. 

Describes and discasses evidence bearing 
on the extent and directions of mnvements of 
the great ice mass. Includes a brief refer- 
ence to the occurrence of bowlder clay 
deposits and to the general terracing of the 
region. 

Notes on the ore deposit of the 

Tread wen mine, Alaska. 

Am. Geologist, vol 4, pp. 84-83. 1889. 
Discussion of genesis and geologic relations. 

On the earlier Cretaceous rocks of 

the northwestern portion of the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 38, pp. 120-. 
127. 1889. 

Abstract, Nature, vol. 40, p. 404, 11 lines. 
1889. Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, p. 769, i p. 1890. 

Discusses correlation, extent, and geologic 
history of Kootauie, Queen Charlotte, and 
other earlier Cretaceous iormations iu west- 
ern Canada, relations of overlying conglora- 
critic series, and Canadian equivalents of the 
Comanche formation of the Texas region. 

Glaciation of high points iu the 

southern interior of British Columbia. 

Geol. Magazine, decade in, vol. 6, pp. 350- 
352. 1889, 

Abstracts, Ottawa Naturalist, vol. 3, pp. 
112-113, I p: 1889. Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, 
p, 771, < lines, 1890. 

List of some glaciated high summits and re- 
marks on their bearing on the conditions of 
the glaciation of the region. 

On the Archean, see FRAZER. 

Report on Archean. 

See, also, Davison, J. W., and Davi- 
son, G. M., on Cretaceous plants from 
Port McNeill, Vancouver Island. 

DAWSON, J. William. On the cor- 
relation of the geological structure of 
the Maritime Provinces of Canada with 
that of western Europe. (Abstract. ) 

Canadian Record of Science, vol. 2, pp. 404- 
406. 1887. 

Scienc e, vol. 9, pp. 589-590. 1887. 

Discusses the differences between the for- 
mations of eastern Canada and those farther 
west, and points out their close similarity to 
the formations of western Europe. 

Notes on fossil woods from the west- 
ern territories of Canada. 

Canadian Record of Science, vol. 2, pp. 499- 
602. 1887. 
Nature, voL 36, pp. 274-275. 1887. 



64 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889, 



[BUUi.75w 



DAWSON, J. Williani— Continned. 

Di8ca88n8 the age of the LarAmie ^oap and 
queHtions of climate and coiit-«>niporanoity of 
the lower Eoceno flora of differeot regions. 

« 

On the relation of the geology of 

the Arctic and Atlantic hasins. 

British Assoc. Adr. Science, Report of 
Fifty sixth Meeting, 1886, p. 638, ^ p. 1887. 

Points ont the intimate relations of the Aro- 
tio formations to those of eastern Korth 
America. 

Some points in which American geo- 
logical science is indebted to Canada. 

Canada, Eoyal Soc., Trans., vol. 4, section 
IV, pp. 1-8. 40. 1887. 

K68um6 of thti history of geologic research 
in Gana<la. ospocially by Logan. Brledy dis- 
casses the snbdiviHions of the pre-Cambrian 
of Canada; the relations and e(]uiyalency of 
the " Quebec " group, the position of the " so- 
called Jnrassic of the western territories of 
the United States," and continental glaoia- 
tion. 

On the fossil plants of the Laramie 

formation of Canada. 

Canada, Eoyal Soc, Trans., voL 4, section 
IV, pp. 19-34, pis. 1-2, 40. 1887. 

Describes the extent and stratigraphy of 
the formation and discusses its eqid valency 
and floral relations. 

Cretaceons floras of the northwest 

territories of Canada. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 053-959. 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to Royal Society of 
Canada. 1888. 

Discussion of stratigraphic positions, the 
value of fossil plants in indicating geologic 
horizons, and the physical conditions and cli- 
mate indicated by the faunas. 

Preliminary note on new species of 

sponges from the Quebec group at Lit- 
tle Metis. 

Canadian Eecord of Science, voL 3, pp. 49, 
59, plate. 1888. 

Discussion of the geologic horizon of the 
beds. 

Eozoon canadense. 

Canadian Record of Science, voL 3, pp. 201- 
226. 1888. 

Extracts from publications of the Peter 
Bedpath Museum, September, 1888. 

In pait as "On new facts relating to 
Eozoon canadenso," G-eol. Magazine, decade 
3, vol. 5, pp. 49-54, plate. 188& 

Beview of paragraph 9, on upper Lanren- 
tian, by A. R. C. Selwyn, Science, vol. 11, p. 
146, i col. 1888. 

Includes incidental references to containing 
beds at several localities, beds of fragmental 
Sozoon, the relations of the limestones of the 



DAVIS, William Morris— Con tinned, 
middle Laurentian, the aqueous origi]! of the 
greater part of the apper Laurentian, the 
equivalency of some of the or ■ stalline rooks 
west of Lake Superior with the upper Lau- 
rentian of St. Jerome, and some instaiioes of 
rock lamination. 

Notes on fossil woods and other 

plant remains from the Cretaceons and 
Laramie formations of the western ter- 
ritories of Canada. 

Canada, Royal Soc., Trans., voL 5, section 
nr, pp. 31-37, 40. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Goologist, vol 1, pp. 195-197. 
1888. 

Includes referMices to localities, climatic 
conditions in later Cretaceous and early Ter- 
tiary times, the position of the Laramie of the 
Northwest, and the distinction between the 
lower and upper Laramie. 



— On the Eozoio and Paleozoic locks 
of the Atlantic coast of Canada in com- 
parison with those of western Enrope 
and the interior of America. 

Osol. Soo., Quart. Jonr., vol, 44, pp. 797-817. 
188& 

Abstracts, Geol. Magazine, 8d decade, voL 
5, pp. 831-332, 1888; Canadian Record Sci- 
ence, voL 3, pp. 182-183, 230-231, 1888; Nature, 
vol. 38, p. 142, f col, 1888; Popular Science 
Monthly, voL 36, p. 287, i p., 1889. 

Subdivisions, relations, history, extent, and 
equivalency of Laiurentian, Huronian, Cam- 
brian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and 
Cai boniferoos systems. 

— [On nomenclatnre, snhdivisions, 
characteristics, evidence of life and 
origin of some members of the Archean, 
origin of serpentines, classification of 
Archean emptives, nomenclature of 
lower Paleooic] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, p. 71, | p. 

— [On use of term "Taconic."] 

Litemational "Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 1 line. 
Am. Geologist, voL 3, p. 207. 
Expression of opinion. 

— On Nematophyton and allied forms 
from the Devonian (Erian) of Gasp^ 
and Bay des Chalenrs. Introductory 
geological note. 

Canada, Royal Soo., Trans., voL 6, Section 
IV, pp. 27-36. 1889. 

Includes a sketch of the stratigraphy of the 
region and table showing the equivalency of 
the Devonian beds with those of other locali- 
ties. 



DABfOH.) 



BECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



65 



DAWSON, J. William— Continued. 

Supplemental note to a paper on the 

locks of the Atlantic coast of Canada. 

6«ol. Soo., Quart. Jour., yoL 45, p. 80, i p. 
1889. 

Befereiroe to the poittion of the OUneOui 
fKonsk and to the hearing of new eridenoe on 
this point on the geologic conditions daring 
Lower Gainhrian and late pre-Camhrian times. 

Note on Balanns Hameri in the 



Pleistocene at Bivi^re Beaudette, and 
on the occurrence of peculiar varieties 
of Mya arenaria and M. truncata in the 
modem sea and in the Pleistocene. 

Canadian Raeord 8eiaiice,ToL 8, pp. 287-292. 
1889. 

Brief reference to nature and equlTalenoy 
of the oontaining heds. 

— Handbook of geology for the use of 



Canadian students, p. 250, Montreal. 
1889. 

— and DAWBON, G.M. On Creta- 



ceous plahts from Port McNeill, Yan- 
oouver Island. 

Canada, Royal Soe., Trans., vol. 6, Section 
IV, pp. 71-72. 

Abstract, Canadian Reoord of Science, toL 
8, p. 107, 1 p. 1888. 

Includes p deseription of the relations of the 
plant-bearing beds and statement in regnrd 
to their eqniralency and age. 

[DAT, David T.] Infusorial earth. 

IT. S. Geol. Surrey, llbning Resources, 
1887,p.66A,|p. 1888. 

notice of occurrence at Pope's Creek, 
Maryland, and LinkviUe, Klamath County, 
Oregon. wiLnalyses of former by P. de P. 
Bicketta. 

I>ela^rare, Sand dunes of Lewes, 

ROTHBOCK. 

DBBCING, J. L. See HERRICK, C. L. 
and CTiABTTB, £. S. 

Penlaon UniverBity, Scientific Labor- 
atories Bnlietin, voL 2. 
Clinton group of Ohio, Foerste. 
Geological history of Licking County, 

Herbick. 
Geology of Michipiciton Bay, Hbr- 
BiOK, Tight and Jones. 

ToL 3. 

Clinton group of Ohio, Foerste. 
Geology of Licking County, Ohio, 

HXBIUGK. 

7oL4. 



Geology of Licking County, Herrick. 
BulL76 5 



Deniaon University, Scientific Labor- 
atories, Bulletin, vol. 4 — Continued. 
Contact phenomena in South Caro- 
lina, BlOHARDS. 

DBNKIS, D. W. The east-west diam- 
eter of the Silurian island about Cin- 
cinnati. 

Am. Natnrallst, voL 22, p. 94, 8 lines. 1888. 
. Abstract of paper read to Indiana Academy 
of Science. 

Beference |d occurrence of beds indicating 
position of shore line. 

Deutsche Oeologische Oesellschedt, 
Zeitachrift, vol. 40. 
Jomllo in Mexico, Felix. 

DERB7, Orville A. On the occurrence 
. of monazlte as an accessory element ia 
rocks. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 109-113. 
1889. 

Annooncement of discovery of monazite 
and zircon as constitoents of yarioas granite 
rocks is Brazil. 
Devonian. 
Alabama J Spencer, J. W. 
Canadaj At-ta-wa-pish-kat and Albany 
rivers. Bell. 
Baffin Land, Boas. 
Eozoic and Paleozoic of Canada, 

Dawson, J, W. 
explorations in portions of New 
Brunswick, Bailet and McInxes. 
gypsum in northern Manitoba, 

Tyrrell. 
natural gas in Quebec, Laflamme. 
Nematophyton from Gaspd, Dawson, 

J.W. 
northern Maine and New Brunswick, 

Bailey. 
northern part of the Dominion of 

Canada, Dawson, G. M. 
Nova Scotia, faults and foldings in 

Pictou coal field, Gilpin. 
Nova Scotia, Guysborough, Antigon- 

ish, and Pictou, Fletcher. 
Ontario iron ores, Ives. 
Ontario petroleum field. Bell. 
Ontario, range of Hamilton fossils, 

Calvin. 
organisms in southern New Bruns- 
wick, Matthew. 
Passamaquoddy Bay region, Mat- 
thew. 
Red River Valley, Manitoba, Mo- 
Charle. 



66 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75. 



Devonian — Continued. 
Canada — Continued. 

relations between geology of Maine 
and New Brunswick, Bailrt. 

Rocky Mountains near the 5lBt par- 
allel, MCCONNELL. 

well at Port Colborne, McRab, 
Georgia, Spknckr, J. W. 
Indiana, Gobley. Thompson, M. 
Itwa, Devonian faunae, Williams, H. S. 

general description, Webster. 

Johnson County, Webster. 

Muscatine County, Calvin. 

Rockford shales, Webster. 

southeastern Iowa, Gk>RDON. 

well at Keokuk, Gordon. 

well at Davenport, Tiffany. 
* well at Washington, Calvin. 
Kansas, Leavenworth well, Jab^eson. 
Kentucky, Bath and Fleming counties, 

LiNNEY. 

Clarke, Lincoln, Mercer, Linney. 
central Kentucky, Linney., 
Garrard County, Linney. ^ 
Henry, Selby, and Oldham counties, 

Linney. 
Jackson purchase region, Lough- 
ridge. 
Marion County, Knott. 
Nelson County, Linney. 
Oriskany of eastern, Proctor. 
Ohio VaJley, Shaler. 
Pound Gap region, Crandall. 
rocks of central Kentucky, Linney. 
Maine, Aroostook County, Bailey. 
Eastport, Shaler. 
northern Maine, Bailey. 
Minnesota, natural gas weUs, Winch- 

ELL, N. H. 
maps, Upbam. 
artesian wells, Hall, C. W. 
Missouri, Chouteau group, Rowley. 
history of Ozark uplift, Broadhead. 
Macon County, McGee. 
Montana, Gallatin region, Hayden. 

Walcott. 
Nebraska, well at Lincoln, Russell, 

J. W. 
well in Pawnee County, Russell, 

J. W. 
New Jersey, Green Pond Mountain 

group, Merrill, F. J. H. 
geologic map. Cook. 
map of vicinity of New York city, 

Martin. 
New York, building stones, Smock. 



I Devonian— Continued. 
New York — Continued. 

fauna of upper Devonian; Genesee 
section, Williams, H. S. 

Hamilton of Chenango and Otsego 
counties, Prosser. 

Oneonta sandstone, Bebcher and 
Hall. Hall, J. 

petroleum and gas regions, Ash- 
burner. 

TuUy limestone, Williams, S. G. 

well at Morrisville, Prosser. 

Williams's report on Devonie, Mar- 
cou. 
Nomenclature and classification, report of 
subcommittee on upper Paleozoic, 
International Congress of Geolo- 
gists, Williams, H. S. 

plants of the Paleozoic, Lesquerkux. 

Williams's report on Devonic, Mau- 
cou. 

comparison of cis- with trans- Atlantic 
formations, Winchkll; H. S. 

types of Devonian system in North 
America, Williams, H. S. 
Ohio, geology of Ohio, Orton. 

Licking County, Herrick. 

plants, Newberry. 

report on oil and gas, Orton. 

sporocarps in Ohio slate, Orton. 

Waverly group, Herrick. 
Pennsylvania,, Cskmbiifk County, FuL- 

four great sandstones, Claypo^e. 
Lehigh River cross section, Hill, 

F. A. WiNSLOW. 

materials of the Appalachians, Clay- 
pole. 

northern, Williams, H. S. 

oil and gas regions, Carll. 

paint ores along Lehigh River, Hill, 
F. A. 
Virginias, Greenbrier County, Page. 

Low Moor, Lyman. 

mineral resources of Tennessee, 
Page. 

New River-Cripple Creek region, 
d'Invilliers and McCreath. 

southwestern Virginia, Stevenson. 

DEWEY, Fred. P. Note on the nickel 
ore of Russell Springs, Logan County, 
Kansas. 

Am. Ingt. Mining Engineers, I'rans., voL 
17, pp. 636-637. 1889. 

lucludes brief reference to geologic rela- 
tions of beds in which it occurs. 



OABTON.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



67 



DILLER, J. 8. Not«8 on the geology of 
northern California (abstract). 

Washington, Phil. Soo., Bull., vol. 9, pp. 
4-5 (additional note on p. 8). 1687. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d aeries, vol. 33, pp. 152-153. 
1887. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 125-126, ^ p. 1888. 

Popular Science Monthly, vol. 32, p 419. 10 
lines. 1888. 

Abstract of U. S. OeoL Sarvey, Bulletin No. 
33, described in the 1886 bibliofcraphy. 

The lateet volcanic eruption in 



northern California and its peculiar 
lava. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33, pp. 45-50. 
1887, 

Abstract, Atn. G-eologist, vol. 1, p. 126, ^ p. 
1888. 

Describes beds of volcanic ash, in places in- 
closinji; the stamps of more or less decayed 
trees, and in part overlain by a peculiar 
** quartz basalt,*' the nature, origin, and occur* 
rence of which is discussed at length. 

— Peridotlte of Elliott County, Ken- 
tucky. 

IT. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 6, pp. 357- 
385, No. 38. 1887. 

Abstracts, Am. Geologist, voL 1, p. 125, 1 p. 
1888. Popular Science Monthly, vol. 32, p. 
420,icoL 1888. 

(By Geo. H. Williams), Nenes Jahrbnch, 
1887,' voL 2, pp. 475-476. 

Describes its occurrence, micro-petrography, 
structure, and alteration. Discusses its na- 
ture, origin, and relations to the associated 
Carboniferous sandstones. Quotes Craudall's 
description of the region. 

— Supplementary note on the perido> 
tite of Elliott County, Kentucky. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 219- 
220. 1889. 
Entirely petrographic 



— [Report on petrography of perido- 
tlte from Douglas County, Oregon, and 
Webster, North Carolina.] See 
ClffARKE, F. W., on nickel ores from 
Oregon. 



and KUNZ, George F. Is there a 

diamond field in Kentucky 1 

Science, vol. 10, pp. 140-142. 1887. 

Describe and figure the peridotite outcrops, 
call attention to an exposure of contact with 
the Carboniferous sbales, and discuss the pos- 
sibilities of the occurrence of diamonds. 

DODGE, James A. Anthracite coal in 
the valley of the Bow River, Northwest 
Territory of Canada. 



DODGE, James A.— Continued. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 172-173. 1888. 
Analyses ftnd letter from A. Pugh on num* 
ber of beds and dip. 

DRUMMOND, A. T. The distribution 
• and physical and past geological rela- 
tions of British North American x)lants. 

Canadian Eecord of Science, vol. 2, pp. 412- 
423,457-469. 1887. Vol. 8, pp. 1-21. 1888. 

Discusses probability of a Tertiary land 
connection between Asia and North America, 
and post-Tertiary changes in North American 
physiography which would impede the east- 
ward extension of plants. Advances botan- 
ical evidence in opposition to the idea of re« 
gional glaciation in Canada, and argues in 
favor of local glaciation. Incidentally refers 
to climatic conditions in later Cretaceous and 
Eocene times indicated by the flora. 

The prairies of Manitoha. 

Canadian Record Science, voL 3, pp. 39-43. 
1888. 

Description of superficial deposits and dis- 
cussion of the origin of the prairies. 



The great lake basins of Canada. 

Canadian Record Science, vol. 3, pp. 142- 
147. 1888. 

Abstract^ Popnl^ Science Monthly, vol 35. 
pp. 422-423, i p. 1889. 

Objections to the theory of oontinental gla- 
ciation in America. Discussion of origin of 
the basins and the relations of land and water 
in northern North America during the glacial 
epochs. 

The great lake basins of the St. 

Lawrence. 

Canadian Record Science, vol. 3, pp. 247- 
287. 1889. 

Abstracts, Science,vol. 13, p. 32, | col. 1889. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 197-199, i p.8. 1889. 

A discussion of their origin, history, associ- 
ated superficial deposits, relations to geo- 
logic structure of the regiou and conditions 
during glacial period. 

DXJMBLE, E. T. The Nacogdoches oil 
field. 

Geol. and Sci. Bull., vol. 1, March, 1888, f 
col. 

References to the lower Eocene horizon of 
the oil-bearing beds. 

DUNN, Russell L. Drift mining in Cali- 
fornia. 

California, Eighth Report of State Mineral- 
ogist, pp. 736-770. 1888. 

Includes references to the ancient drainage 
systems to which the gold-bearing gravels be- 
long. DiBcust*e8 relations, sequence, and ex- 
tent of some of the lava flows by which this 
drainage system was displaced. 



68 



BECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



lBniiL.7SL 



DUTTON, Clarence £. Meant Taylor 
and the Zu&i Plateau. 

IT. S. O^eol. Bvartjf Sixth Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1884'-85, pp. 108-198, pis. 11-22. 1885. 

Abstracts, Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 34, 
pp. 155-198, pU. 11-12 ; Science, rol. 10, pp. 317- 
318. 188'7. 

Describes the High Plateaacoontry as a 
whole, the formations of northwestern New 
3^xico, extending firom upper Carboniferous 
to Wahsatoh sandstone, the uplift or "swell" 
of the Zufii Plateau, the Zuni uplift, Mount 
Ta3Uor and vicinity with its great middle 
Tertiary lava flows and old vents, the never 
lavas of the San Jos6 valley region and their 
source, and the areal geologic features in 
general. Discusses questions of sjrnchronism 
and stratigraphy, especially in regard to the 
Juraand Trias, the mechanism of the faults on 
the soathwest side of the Zufii Plateau, the 
relations of the Archean to the adjacent Car- 
boniferous rocks along the axis of the Zufii 
Plateau, and the age, extent, and mode of ex- 
trusion of the lavas of Mount Taylor and 
vicinity, and of the more recent flows. Chap- 
ter V consists of a general discussion of the 
geologic history of the High Plateau and ad- 
joining regions. 

The submerged trees of the Colum- 
bia River. 

Science, vol. 9, pp. 82-84. 1887. 

Describes evidence of a slight post-glacial 
transverse anticlinal as the cause of dam- 
ming. 

[On geologic nomenclature in gen- 
eral, and t'tie classification, nomencla- 
ture, and distinctive characteristics of 
the pre-Cambrian formations, and the 
origin of serpentines.] 

International Congress of Gi-eologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 71-73. 

[ ] [On the use of the term Taconic] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Conmiittee Reports, 1888, B., p. 17, 1 line. 
Am. aeologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Statement of opinion. 

Report — Division of volcanic geol- 
ogy- 
XT. S. Geol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 97-103. 1888. 

Includes a general dencription of the geol- 
ogy of the region between the Cascade Ranges 
and the Sierra Nevada, the southern part of 
the Cascade Ranges, and the region westward, 
including the Coast Ranges in western Oregon 
and northwestern California. 

On some of the greater problems of 

physical geology. 

Washington Phil. Soc, Bull., vol. 11, pp. 
51-64. 1889^ 



DX7TTON, Clarence E.—Continaed. 
Discussion of earth emst deformation. 

DWIGHT, William B. Palffiontological 
observations on tlie Taconic limestones 
of Canaan, Columbia County^ New 
York. (Abstract.) 

American ITataraUst, voL 21, pp. 270-27L 
1887. 

Describes Trenton and Caloiferous fossilif- 
erous limesUme exposures. 

Primordial rooks of the Wappinger 

Valley limestones. 

Vassar Brothers' Inst., Trans., vol. 4, pp. 
130-Ul, PLl. 1887. 

Republication of a paper entitled ** Discov- 
ery of fosslliferons Potsdam strata at Poagh- 
keepsie, New Tork," in Am. Jour. Sci., 3d 
series, voL 31, pp. 125-133, pi. 6, and described 
in the bibliography for 1888. 

Primordial rocks of the Wappinger 

Valley limestones and associated strata. 

Vassar Brotiiers' Inst., Trans., voL 4, pp. 
206-214. 1887. See, also. Am. Jour. Sci., 3d 
series, vol. 34, pp. 27-32. 1887. 

Calls attention to several new localities of 
fossiliferous Potsdam and discusses the rela- 
tions of the several belts of this formation to 
each other and to the associated limestones. 
Annoances the discovery by himself and 
Walcott of middle Cambrian remains in the 
quartzites and limestone on the flanks of 
Stissing Mountain and its vicinity, and 
describes the structure of l^e region. Gives 
a general r6sum6 of the formations occurring 
, in Dutchess County, New York. 

[Remarks on cmstal plioattou in 



continental elevation. ] 

Vassar Brothers' Inst., Trans., vol. 4, pp. 
271-273. 1887. 

Dibcasses Warring's address on the evolu- 
tion of continents. 

— Recent explorations in the Wappin- 
ger Valley limestone of Dutchess 
County, New York. No. 6. Discovery 
of additional fossiliferous Potsdam 
strata and pre-Potsdam strata of the 
Olenellus group, near Poughkeepsie, 
New York. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 34, pp. 27-32. 
1887. 

Essentially similar to "Primordial rocks of 
the Wappinger Yalloy limestones and asso- 
ciate strata,'* which antedates it.~ 

— Recent explorations in the Wappin- 
ger Valley limestones and other forma- 
tions of Dutchess County, New York. 
No. 7. Fossiliferous strata of the para- 
doxides zone at Stissing. No. 8. Dis- 



DARTO??.! 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



69 



DWIGHT, William B.—Continned. 
covery of Calciferons fossils in the 
Millerton-Fishkill limestone belt ; also 
in a belt near RUinebeck. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 38, pp. 139- 
153, pL 6. 1889. 
No. 7.- Description of relations of Olenellas- 



D'WIGHT, William B.—Continned. 

Ordoviciaii in the vicinity of Stissinfc Monn* 
tain and Fine Plains. Descriptions of fossils. 
No. 8. Announcementof discovery of fossils 
and brief discussion of relations of limestones 
and schists in the vicinity of Millerton; 
also announces fossils from near Rhinebeck. 



E. 



Edinburgh Oeological Society, Trans- 
actions, vol. 5. 

Canadian and Scottish glacial geol- 
ogy, Richardson. 

Geology of Winnipeg district, Mc- 
Charles. 

Lake age in Ohio, Claypole, 

Terraces of American lakes and roads 
of Glenroy, Kiha^an. 

Eccentricity theory of glacial cold, 
Claypole. 

ZSLDRTDOB, George H. Some sngges- 
tions npon the method of gronping the' 
formations of the middle Cretaceous 
and the employment of an additional 
term in its nomenclature. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 38, pp. 313- 
321. 1889. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, voL 24, p. 7B0, i p. 
1890. 

A disctission of the classification of the 
middle Cretaceons in the West and Northwest, 
Incladinj; a general description of the charac- 
teristics of its several members. 

On some stratigraphical and struc- 
tural features of the country ahout 
Denver, Colorado. 

Colorado Sci. Soc. , Froc. , vol. 3, pp. 86-118, 
1889. 

Description of the Archean and Triassic to 
Tertiary formations, coals, nnconformities. 
faults, flexures, and topo;in'*apbic characteris- 
tics, discussion of various questions of equiv- 
alency and classification, and sketch of geo- 
logic history of the region. 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 
Journal, 1888, part 2. 

Mica mining in North Carolina, 

PmLLIPS. 

BIiLS, R. W. Kei>ort on the geoiogy of 
a portion of the eastern townships, 
relating more especially to the counties 
of ComptoUy Stanstead, Beauce, Rich- 
mond, and Wolfe. 

Canada, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, Ee- 
port, 1886, part J, pp. 70, plates, map 5 in at- 
las. 1887. 



ELLS, R. W.— Continued. 

Abstracts, Ibid.,.part A, pp. 28-36. Geol. 
Magazine, in, vol 6, pp. 134-13$. 1889. 

Description of Silurian, Cambro- Silurian, 
Cambrian, pre- Cambrian, granites, diorites, 
serpentiutrs, drifts and structure, and dis- 
onssiop of the age, history, equivalency, and 
structural relations of the several formations, 
and the nature of f^Iaciation iu the region. 
List of glacial strise. Accompanied by a 
colored geologic map. 

Elementary lecture on geology. 

Ottawa Naturalist, vol. 2, pp. 117-134. 1889. 

An account of the history of geologic 
science and sketch of geologic history of 
Canada, in which are included brief discus- 
sions of the nature and relations of the pre- 
Cambrian crystallines and of the conditions 
during the Quaternary. 

Notes on the geological relations 

and mode of occurrence of some of the 
more important economic minerals of 
eastern Quehec. 

Ottawa Naturalist, vol. 3, pp. 4&-57. 1889. 

Includes a brief general account of the 
geology of the region, incidental i-eferences 
to geologic features, and allusions to age of 
the gold-bearing series and to occurrence and 
relations of the serpentines. 

EMERSON, B.4E. The Connecticut 
Lake of the Cliamplain period, north 
of Holyoke. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 404- 
405, i p. 1887. 

Abstract of paper on Harapahtre County, 
Massachusetts. Describes the outline of the 
lake and its deposits. Discusses the duration 
of the lake and the remoteness of the glacial 
period. 

[On the use of the term *^ Taconic."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Com. Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 2 lines. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Expression of opinion. 

Topography — geological features 

[etc. J. 

Massachusetts, Hampshire County Ga« 
zetteer, 1654-1887, by W. B. Gay, Syracuse, 
N.Y., pp. 10-22. 1888. 



70 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



(bull. 75. 



EMERSON, B. K.— Continned. 

Cryetalline rockn, Triansic formaHon aod 
glacial features, and a brief sketch of the 
geologic history of the region. ^ 

On the Archean. See 



Report on Archean. 

EMMONS, Ebenezer. G^lo^y of the 
Montmorenoi. 

Am. G-eologist, voL 2, pp. 94-100. 1888. 
From the Am. MagazinOi November, 1841. 

EMMONS, S. F. Report * * • 
Rocky Mountain division. 

XT. 8. Oeol. Surrey, Sixth Report, 1884-'8&, 
pp.e2-67. 1886. 

Outlines eyidence in the Gunnison district 
and elsewhere, indicating a Jnrassic and a 
Carboniferons nnconformity in the Bocky 
Mountain region. Describes the age and ex- 
tent of the uplifts. 

[On the use of the term^Taconic.''] 

International Congress of GS-eologists, Am. 
Oommittee Report, 1888, B, p. 17, 2 lines. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Expression of opinion. 

Geology and mining industry of 

Leadville, Colorado. U. 8. Geol. Sur- 
vey, Monographs. No. 12, 2 vols. 4°: vol. 
1, pp. XXIX, 1-362, pis. 1-21; vol. 2, 
pp. 363-770, pis. 22-45, and folio atlas of 

35 plates. 'Washiugton, 1886. 

Abstracts, Science, vol. 11, pp. 18-19, 1889 ; 
Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 194-195, 1888; 
Nature, vol. 30, pp. 484-485, 1889; Scottish 
Q-eogr. Mag., vol. 5, pp. 198-202, 1889. 

Detailed description of the geology of the 
Mosquito Bange and of Leadville and vicinity. 
Discusses geologic history ; stratigraphy and 
structural relations; origin of dolomites; occur- 
rence of serpentine in Silurian rocks and else- 
'wbere ; the relations of the faults and flexures 
and their development ; the structure of the 
Bocky Mountains and Basin Banges ; the suc- 
cession, age, extent, texture, and composition 
of the eruptive rocks, the mechanism and ex- 
tent of intrusion, the distribution of intrusives 
in the Bocky Mountains, the occurrence of 
laccolites in the Henry Monntains and else- 
where ; contact, metamorphism, classification 
of ore deposits in general, and the relations, 
composition, and genesis of the Leadville de- 
posits. Accompanied by maps, plans, and 
sections, and includes : Appendix A, Petrog- 
raphy, by Whitman Cross; B, Chemistry, 
by W. P. Hillebrand, and C, Metallurgy, by 
Antony Guyard. 

— Notes on some Colorado ore deposits. 

Oolorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol. 2, part 2, pp. 
85-105. 1887. 

Considers the relation of faults to ore de- 
posits, describing some features of the Lead- 
ville, Carbonate Hill, and San Juan regions. 



EMMONS, S. F.^Continued. 

Discusses some metamorphic changes in the 
San Juan region and secondary alteration of 
ore deposits in general, and »6 observed at 
Bed CltflT and Leadville. 

Notes on the geology of Bntte, Mon- 
tana. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 49-02. 1887. 

Describes the topography, mineral deposits 
and characteristics, and distribution of the 
rooks. Discusses the origin of the depression 
in which Butte is situated, the htstor3' of its 
ores, and the relations of the fissures. The 
genesis of the ores is also discussed by K. W. 
Baymond, pp. 11-1 4. * 

The sabmerged trees of the Colum- 



bia River. 

Science, vol. 9, pp. 156-157. 1887. 

Discusses the cause of the damming of the 
Columbia Biver, restating an explanation 
previously published, and opposing Duttou's 
theory of a transverse anticiinaL 

— Stmctnral relations of ore deposits. 

» 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 804-839. 1888. 

Discussion of causes, nature, and relations 
of structural and physical conditions affect- 
ing the transportation and deposition of min- 
eral matter. References to relations of faults 
and mineral deposits in various parts of Colo- 
rado and at the Ontario mine, Utah. 

— On the origin of fissure veins. 

Oolorado Sci. Soc., I^oc, vol. 2, pp. 189- 
208. 188& 

Discussion of the physloal and structural 
conditions affecting the transportation and 
deposition of mineral matters and the origin 
and relations of Assures and planes produced 
by dynamic movements. 

— On glaciers in the Rocky Mountains. 

Oolorado Sci. Soc, Proc, vol. 2, pp. 211- 
227. 188a 

Consists mainly of a discussion of distinc- 
tions between glaciers and n6v6 and an ac- 
count of the existence of glaciers in the Bocky 
Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Befers 
Uso to the results of former glacisition in the 
same regions. 

— Preliminary notes on Aspen, Colo- 
rado. 

Oolorado Sci. Soc, Proo.,^ol. 2, pp. 251- 
277. 1888. 

Account of geologic relations of the region 
and discussion of the structure of Aspen 
Mountain, the dolomitization of the lime- 
stones, and evidence bearing on the sequence 
of porphyry intrusions^ faulting, and ore depo- 
sition. Beference to evidences of glaciation. 

— [On subdlvisious, nomenclature, ori- 
gin of some members, and characteris- 



DAKTOlCl 



BECORD OF QEOLOGT FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



71 



EMMONS, S. F.— CoDtinned. 
ties of the Archeaii| classification of 
ernptives, and origin of serpentines.] 

International Oongreaa of Gl-eologi«t«, Am. 
Qommittee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 58-61. 

[On the nse of the Term »*Taconic." 

International Oongreaa of Greologists, Am. 
Committee Report, 1888, B, p. 17, 2 lines. 

BKDLICH, P. M, The origin of the 
gold deposits near Onray, Colorado. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., voL 48, p. 835, } p. 
4°. 1889. 

Inclades a general description of the geo- 
logic features of the region. 

siraiNEERiNa and mininq 

JOURNAL. Gogebic iron mines. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol.43, p. 182, 4P, 
1887. 

Description of nature and stmctnre of ore 
beds and associated strata. 

The "Dauntless" core drill. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., voL 46, p. 198. 4P. 
1888. 

Gives columnar section of coal measures in 
drill-hole at Saybrook, Illinois. 

The Sylvanite mine, Colorado. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 40, pp. 499-500. 
40. 1888. 

Brief reference to presence of associated 
diorite and highly altered sediments. 

Zinc mining in Arkansas. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol.47, p. 431, f p. 
40. 1889. 

Includes a brief general sketch of geology 
of zinc region in Marion County. 

XSngineerlng and Mining Journal, vols. 
43 and 44. 
American chemical industries, salt, 

Wyatt. 
Battle Mountain mining district, Ol- 

COTT. 

Ghapin iron mine, Lake Superior, 
Labsson. 

Copper deposits, Morenci, Arizona, 
Henrich. 

Copper ores of Southwest, Wendt. 

Earthquake phenomena. Freeman. 

Elem^ts of primary geology, Hunt. 

Fossil fuels of Illinois, Comstock. 

Geologic map of Europe, Raymond. 

Geologic snrvey of New Jersey, Re- 
-poTt, Raymond. 

Gogebic iron mines, Eng. and Min- 
ing Journal. 

Lead and copper of Missouri, Clekc. 

Mineral resources of Kentucky, Pkoc- 
TOB. 



Engineering and Mining Journal, vols. 
43 and 44 — Continued. 
Natural gas in United States, Ash- 
burner. 
PhcBuix mine, Arizona, Bicketts. 
San Pedro copper mine, New Mexico, 

Henrich. 
Silver mines. Thunder Bay, Bell. 
Tin in Ncyrth Carolina, Van Ness. 

voL 45. 

Western iron belt of Tennessee, 

KiLLEBREW. 

East Tennessee minerals, Cowlam. 
Mineral resources of Tennessee^ 

Proctor. 
Coeur d'Alene silver-lead mines, 

Clayton. 
Beaver mine, Ontario, Canada, Brent. 
Formation of coal seams, Nathurst. 
Geology of Aspon, Colorado, ore 

deposits, SiVER. 
Geology and mining industry of 

Leadville, Emmons [Review], 

Raymond. 
Mica mining in North Carolina, 

Phillips. 
Formation of coal seams, Gresley. 
Formation of coal beds, Wardroper. 
vol. 46. 



Aspen Mountain ores, Brunton. 

Drumlummou group of veins, Clay- 
ton. 

Ore deposits of Red Mountain dis- 
trict, Colorado, Kedzie. 

"Dauntless" core drill, Enoineer- 
iNG AND Mining Journal. 

Michigan gold fields, Parker. 

Coal measures of Kansas, Wooster. 

Petite Anse salt mine, Pobceroy. 

Life history of Niagara Falls, Pohl- 

MAN. 

Ore deposits in limestones, Henrich. 

United and Champion copper mines 
of New Zealand, Henrich. 

Metamorphism in rocks, Henrich. 

Drainage of the valley of Mexico, 
Chism. 

Colorado oil fields, Newberry. 

Sylvanite mine, Colorado, Engineer- 
ing AND Mining Journal. 

— voL 47. 

Coal field of southwest Virginia, 

Killebrew. 
Reyniert loile, Arizona, Blauvelt. 
Zinc mining in Arkansas, Eng. and 

Mining Journal. 



72 



BECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



Cm&m 



Engineering and Mining Jonxnal, vol 
48 — Continued. 
Slaybaoh lode, Hbkrich. 
Iron ore st Bnena Vista, Virginia, 

Prchin. 
Is a fanlted fissure the oldeBtt HSN- 

RICH. 

History of the great American lakes, 

Newberry. ^ 

Gold deposits near Onray, Colorado, 

Endlich. 
Catorce mining district, Chibic. 
Esaex InatitatOp Bulletin, voL 20. 

Geology of vicinity of Salem, Massa- 
chasetts, Sears. 

vol. 21. 

Geological and mineralogio notes. 
Sears. 
Europe. 

classification of Cambrian, Mat- 
thew. 
ancient glaciers of North Wales, 
Evans. 



Europe — Coniintied. 

Eztra-imminio lakes and olays in 

England, Nwth Ameriea, ete. 

Lewis. 
comparison of eit- with trana-Ailan- 

tio formations, Wiluamb, H. S. 
fknniB of lower Lias, Htatt. 
geologio map, Fbazbr. Batmond. 
geological toorist in Europe, Lane. 
glacial erosion in Norway, SpbUckr. 
neighborhood of Seyille, Locking- 

TOK. 

position of Alpine Bhsstio, Culrk. 
terminal raoraiDsa in North Germany, 

Salisbury. 
stratigraphie position of Olenellos, 

Walcott. 

• 

EVANS, F. Johnston^ Among the an- 
cient glaciers of North Wales. 

Am. Vatondlst, toL 23, pp »-17. 1889. 
Deaoription of eyidenooB of glaciation. 



R 



FARIBAULT, E. B. Beport on the 
lower Cambrian rocks of Gaysboroagh 
and Halifa:^ connties, Nova Scotia. 

Canada, Gl-eol. and ITat. Hist. Surrey, Re- 
port, 1886, part P, pp. 129-163. 1887. 

Abstract, Ibid., part A, pp. 43-45. 

Description of the distribution, character- 
istics, and contact relations of the granites 
and the Cambrian beds, and the faults and 
flexures traversinjc them. 

PARNSWORTH, P. J. Pockets con- 
taining fire-clay and carbonaceous 
materials in the Niagara limestone at 
Clinton, Iowa. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 331-334. 1888. 

Description and discussion of mode of ori- 
gin and equivalency with other similar de- 
posits. 

FAIJR, Faber dn. The snlphnr deposits 
of son them Utah. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
16, pp. 3a-35. 1887. 

Describes decomposed andesites, trachyte, 
and limestone with sulphur impregnations. 

FELIX, Johannes. Ueber einen besncb 
des JoruUo in Mexico. 

Deutsche G-eol. Gesell., Zeit., vol. 40, pp. 
855-357. 1888. 



FBLIX, Johannes — Con tinned. 

Ihcladea refisrenoes to the natore and rela- 
tions of the laTas, and the character of the 
crater. 

FEWJUIS, J. Walter. On the origin of 
the present form of the Bermudas. 

Boston Soc. Kat. Hist., Proo., vol. 23, pp. 
518-522. 1888. 

Discussion of eroaive agenta and extent of 
erosion. 

Across the Santa Barbara Channel. 

Am. Katnraliat, vol. 98, pp. 211-217,887-394. 
1888. 

Indndea references to aonie geologie fea- 
tures and history of Santa Cms Island, and 
the origin of some sandstone bowlders near 
Santa Barbara. 

FINCH, W. W. Infnsorial earth at 
Santa Barbara, California. 

Santa Barbara Soc. Vat. Hiat., Bnll. No. 1, 
pp. 8-11. 1887. • 

Not seen: 

FISCHER, MoritK. Natural gas in Ken- 
tucky. 

D. S. Oeol. Snrrey, Miaaral Reaoorcea, 
1887, pp.4aM92. 188a 

Abstract from Am. ManniiEMttnrer, Natural 
gas supplement. 1888. 



DAKlOir.] 



RECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



73 



FIiEMINO, H. S. General desoription 
of the ores used in the Chattanooga 
district. 

Am. Tn«t. Mining Engineers, Tnn«., voL 
15, pp. 757-761. 1887. 

Analyaeft of some AUbMoa and Bast Ten- 
neseee Clinton iron ores. 

FlaETCHBR, Hogh. Beport on geo- 
logical surveys and explorations in the 
coonties ol^ Goysboroogh, Antigonish, 
and PictoOy Nova Scotia, from 1882 to 
1886. 

Oanada, Oeol. and Hat Bist Snirey, Re- 
port, 1886, part P, pp. 5-128. 1887. 

Abstraot, Ibid., part A, pp. 42-45. 

GeoL BCagasine, m, vol. 8, pp. 198-137, | p. 
1889. 

Description of fonnattinis from pre-Cam. 
brian to Permian, snperfloial depoeita, vol- 
oanic and metamorpliic rocks, straojtaral rela- 
tions and overlaps, and discnssion of equiva- 
lency, age. Ikistory, and distribation of the 
formations at varions localities. Soils. 

Florida, deposits of phosphate of lime, 
Penrobk. 
geology of, Dall. Johnson. 
Geologic Survey Beport, KosT. 
Miocene, Langdon. 
Okeechobee wilderness and west 

coast, HSILPRIN. 

well at St. Augustine, Kennish. 
intermediate Pleistocene faana,C0PB. 

FOBRSTE, A. F. The Clinton group of 
Ohio, part 3. 

DenisonUniv. BalL, vol. 2, pp. 80^110, pL; 
PI». 148-176, pis X, XV-XVII. 1887. 

Paleontologic. 

Notes on a geological section at 

Todd*8 Fork, Ohio. 

Am. (Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 412-419. 1888. 

Description of Cincinnati blue clay, mark- 
ing the period of disturbance between lower 
and upper Silurian. Discnssion of equiva- 
lency, paleonotologic relations, and history of 
the several members. 

The Clinton group of Ohio, part iv. 

Denison Univ., Soi. Laboratories, Bull., 
vol. 3, pp. 3-iaL 1888. 

Lithologio oharaeterhrtios; analyses; oc- 
currencea of fSoeaOB; discussion of subdivi- 
sions and their eqaivalency, relations to 
acUoltting formations, extent and fkuual re- 
lations. 

The paleontological horizon of the 

limt'Stone at Nahant, Massachusetts. 
Boston ftoe. Vat. Hist., Proc., vol. 24, pp. 
261-268. 1889. 

Abstract, Am. Jour. Soi., 3d series, voL 39, 
p.ll,ip. 1890. 



FOERSTE, A. F.— Continued. 

Discussion of the relations and equivalency 
of the Nahaut lim|stones and of the Cambrian 
rocks of eastern Massachusetts. 

Notes on Clinton group fossils, with 



special reference to collections from 
Indiana, Tennessee, and Georgia. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc, vol.24, pp. 
263-356, pis. 5-9. 1880. 

Abstract, Am. Jour. Soi., 3d series, voL 40, 
pp. 252-254. 1890. 

Includes brief descriptidn of the strati- 
graphy of the Silurian formations at Hanover, 
Tndiana, and at a locality in northwestern 
Georgia. 

Fence- wall geology. 

Ajn. Gl-eologist, vol. 4, pp. 367-371. 1889. 

Sci. Am. Sopt., vol. 29. pp. 11748-11749, 1^ 
cols., 40, No. 735. 1890. 

Hints on the study of areal geology in drift- 
covered areas. 

FORD, 8. W. [On the nomenclature of 
the American lower Paleozoic] 

International Congress of Greologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, ISHS, B, pp. 9-10. 

Am. Otologist, vol. 2, pp. 199-200. 1888. 

Keference to the equivalency of the " Que- 
bec group," use of term Cambriau, position of 
base of Silurian, and the application of the 
term ** primordial fauna." 

Notes on certain fossils discovered 

within the city limits of Quebec. 

New York Acad. Science, Trans., vol. 7, 
pp. 2-5. 1888. 

Review of Charles Lap worth, 1886. Dis- 
cussion of the age and faunal relations of the 
containing beds, and of the stratigraphic posi- 
tion and relations of the Norman's Kill grap- 
tolitic slates in central eastern New York. 

Forum, 1888, Changes of level of the 
Great Lakes, Gilbert. 

Franklin Inatitute, Journal, vols. 123, 
124. 

International Congress of Geologists, 
Frazer. 

Stratification of anthracite of Penn- 
sylvania, Wasmuth. 
VOL 125. 

Soathern anthracite coal field of 
Pennsylvania, Wasmuth. 

FRAZER, Persifor, jr. A card to Ameri- 
can geologists. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series vol. 33, pp. 157-158. 
1887. 

Announcement of time of meeting of Ameri- 
can Committee of the International Congress, 
and request for statements of views in regard 
to classification, nomenclature, coloring, etc 



t_ 



74 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.75l 



FRAZER, Persi for, jr.— Continued. 

International Congress of Geol- 
ogists — American' Qommittee meeting 
at Albany. 

Science, vol. 9, pp. 416-417. 1887. 

Am. Jour. Sci. , 9d series, vol. 33, pp. BlO-^12. 
1887. 

Abstract in part, Franklin Inst., Jour., vol. 
123, pp. 423-424. 1887. 

Beport of proceedings, and a oironlarde* 
scribing the allotment of subjects to report> 
ers,who request f^d in the preparation of 
their reiK>rts. 

Note on the new geological map of 

Europe: 

Am. Inst. Miniilg Engineers, Trans., voL 
15, pp. 681-684. 1887. 

Information in regard to its preparation and 
sale. 

The address of Vice President G. K. 



Gilbert before section £, American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science, Columbia College, New York, 
August 10, 1887. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 841-847. 1887. 

A general review and discussion of the 
salient poiots of the address, which is on the 
work of the International Congress of Geolo* 
gists. , 

— The relations of the International 
Geological Congress to geological 
workers. 

Science, vol. 9, pp. 439-440. 1887. 

Calls attention to the generalized and lib- 
eral nature of the decisions of the Congress, 
quoting some of its recommendations as in- 
stances. 

— Geological questions. 

Science, vol. 10, p. 36. 1887. 

Concerning suzgestions on nomenclature by 
the International Committee, the relations 
and subdivisions of the Archoan, the age and 
nature of crystalline rocks, applicability of 
some European terms to American forma- 
tions, organic life in the "Archean," on the 
classification and map coloring of eruptivea, 
the nature of serpentines, the use of the term 
" Taconio," and the subdivision of the Cam- 
brian. 

— The geologists' Congress. 

Science, vol. 10, pp. 119-120. 1887. 

Discusses the use of the term "Archean" by 
the International Geologic Congress in de- 
fense of the anonymous criticisms in Science, 
vol. 10, p. 88. Explains the reason for includ- 
ing all pre-Cambrian formations in the 
Archean. 

— A short history of the origin and 
acts of the International Congress of 



FRAZER, Perslfor, jr.— Continned. 
Geologists, and of the American Com- 
mittee delegates to it. 

Am. Geologist, vd. 1. pp. 3-11, 8^-100. 1888. 
Bntirely )iistoric. 

Report of the subcommittee on the 

Arcbean. 

International Oongress of a«ologi«t«. Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 74. 

Am. Oeologiat, voL 2,'pp»144-192, without 
appendix 8. 1888. 

Discussion of inclusion of pre-Cambrian in 
Paleozoic; soggestions of committee on no- 
menclature; division, horizons of uncoa- 
formity, nomenclature, classification of erup- 
tives, origin of some members, evidences of 
life and distinctive characteristiGS of Ar- 
chean; classification of emptives; existenceof 
post- Archean crystalline rocks, and origin of 
serpentines. « Summary of "The Azoic sys- 
tem ^nd its pioposed subdivisions by Whit- 
ney and Wadsworth." Digest of report on 
Archean of English committee at Berlin con- 
gress. Inclndes extracts of letters from' K. 
Bell, W. P. Blake, J. D. Dana, G. M. Dawsou, 
J.W.Dawson, C. E. Dutton, B. K Emerson, 
S. F. Emmons, G. K Gilbert, A. Hague. A. 
Heilprin. C. H. Hitchcock, T. & Hunt, R. D. 
Irving, J. LeConte, T. MacFarlane, J. W. Pow- 
ell, R. Pumpdly, A. R. C. Selwyn, M. E. Wads- 
worth, C. D. Walcott, G. H. Williams, A, 
Winchell, and N. H. Winchell. 

An unjnst attack. (Reply to arti- 



cles concerning the American Commit- 
tee of the International Congress of 
Greologistsby Prof. J. D. Dana and Maj. 
J. W. Powell in the American Journal 
of Science for December, 1888. ) 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 65-72. 1889. 

An account of the history of the prepara- 
tion and publication of the various reports 
and some of the proceedings of the committee. 

FREEMAN, H. C. Earthquake phe- 
nomena. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 44, pp. 110-111. 
1887. 

Suggests an explanation for the subsidence 
of 500 acres in Trigg County, Kentucky. 

FRIEDRICH, James J. [Siliciaed 
wood from California. J 

New York Acad Sci., Trans., vol. 8, pp. 20- 
30. 1889. 

Inclndes reference to the relations and age 
of th^ associated deposits in Lake and Napa 
counties. 

PULTON, John. Mode of deposition of 
the iron ores of the Menominee Kange, 
Michigan. 



DABTON.] 



fiHGOBD OF GEOLOGY toU 1887 TO 1889. 



75 



FULTON, John— Continued. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
16, pp. 625-536. 1887. 

Description of geologic relaKlliis of ores and 
enclosing formations. 

Geological map. of Cambria County. 

Pennsylvania, Oeol. Survey, Atlas to 
Reports HH and HHH, 1877, plate 1, 
(colored.) 1888. 

Shows areal distribution of formations from 
Pittsburgh series to GatsklU formatiou, aud 
axes of the flexures. 

— — Geological map of Somerset County. 

Pennsylvania, G-eol. Survey, Atlas to Re- 
ports HH and HHH, 1877, plato 2, (colored.) 
1888. 

Shows areal distribution of formations from 
Monongahela series to Chemung shales, and 
the axes of the flexures. 

Columnar section of the lower pro- 



ductive bituminous coal measures, 

(Alleghany River series,) Cambria 

County, Pennsylvania. 

Pennsylvania, G-eol. Survey, Atlas to Re-^ 
ports HH and HHH, 1877, plate 3. 1888. 

— Geological columnar sections in 
Cambria County. 



PULTON, John— Continued. 

Pennsylvania, Geol. Survey, Atlas to Re- 
ports HH and HHH, 1877, plate 4. 1888. 

Bight borc-hoIe and surface sections i^m 
various authorities. 

[Cross section through the crest of 

the Alleghany Mountain from Benning- 
ton shafc, westward.] 

Pennsylvania, Geol. Survey, Atlas to Re- 
ports HH and HHH, 1887, plate 5. 1888. 
' Showing relations of the coal beds. 

Notes on Cambria County. 

Pennsylvaxiia, Geol. Survey, Atlas to Re- 
ports HH and HHH, pp. 361-369, pi. 1889. 

Records of gas wells at Johnstown and 
Sang Hollow and Bennington section in part, 
revised and corrected. 

FURMAN, John H. The tin deposits of 
North Carolina. 

New York Acad. Sol., Trans., vol 8, pp. 
136-145, 2 plates. 1889. « 

Mainly a description of the geologic rela- 
tions in the King's Mountain region. Illus* 
trated by plates of sections and a geologic 
ukap. 



G. 



GARLAND, J. Copper mining at the 
Cove, Newfoundland. 

Oomwall, Royal Geol. Soc. , Trans., vol. 11, 
pp. SI9-105. 1888. 
Not seen. 



h, S. The Arctic current and 
floating ice as factors in Canadian 
geology. 

Liverpool Geol. Assoc, Jonrn., vol. 8, pp. 
• 75-82. 1889. 

On icebergs as bearers of earth and stones 
and the origin of Canadian drift deposits. 

G-eologic Philosophy. 

Petrography, 

Bayley. Spotted rocks from Pig- 
eon Point, Minnesota. 

Iddixgs. Obsidian cliff, Yellowstone 
Park. 

Chatard. Gneiss-dunyte contacts 
• of North Carolina. 

Iddings. Origin of primary quartz 
in basalt. 

DiLLER. History of porphyritic 
quartz in eruptives. 



Geologic Philosophy— Continued. 
Petrography — Continued. 

£[bmp. Dikes of Hudson River high-: 
lands. 

Lawson. Dikes ofRainy Lake region. 

Bayley. Quartz-keratophyre from 
Pigeon Point. 

Herrick, Clark, and Deming. 
Gabbros and norytes. 

Wadsworth. Peiidotites, gabbros, 
and andesytes of Minnesota. 

Merrill, G. P. Peridotites from 
Little Deer Island, Maine. 

Becker. Quicksilver deposits of 
Pacific slope. 

Merrill, G. P. Ophiolytes of War- 
ren County, New York. 

Sears. Spencer, J. W. Origin of 
bowlders by decomposition. 

Blakk. Emmons, S. F. Russell, L 
C. Sears. Stockbridge. Rock 
decomposition. 

Russell, L. C. Subaerial decay of 
rocks and origin of red color of cer- 
tain rocks. 



76 



RECORD OF QEOLOGT FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75b 



Gheologic Philosophy — Continued. 
Petrography — Continued. 

Iddixgs. LithophysiD and lami- 
nation of acid lavas. 

Emmons, S. F. Gkatacap. Hunt. 
Williams, G. H. Origin of ser- 
pen tines. 

WiLLLAMS, G. H. Holocrjstalline 
granitic structure in Tertiary erup- 
tives. 

Becker. Texture of massive rocks. 

Iddinos. Crystallization of igneous 
rocks. 

WiNCHELL, A. H. Diabasic schists 
with jaspilyte, Minnesota. 

Cross. Paramorphic origin of cer- 
tain minerals. 

'HoBBS. Paragenesis of allanite and 
epidote in rocks. 

Becker. Hunt. Lawson. Wil-' 
LiAMS, G. H. Rock structure. 

Williams, G. H. Archeah geology 
of Maryland. 

Herrick. Metamorphism in rocks. 

Williams, G. H. Metamorphism of 
eruptives on south shore of Lake 
Superior. 

Winchell, a. Conglomerates in 
gneiss. 

Dana, J. D. Variations in intensity 
of metamorphism. 

Irving. Report of Lake Superior 
Division, U. S. Geological Survey. 

Winchell, A. Northeastern Minne- 
sota. 

Frazer, et al. Report on Archean; 
origin of crystallines and serpen- 
tines. 

American Geologist. Danzig on 
nature of gneiss and gi'annlites of 
Saxony. 

Merrill, Q. P. Montville serpen- 
tine. 

Britton. Geology of Staten Island. 
Serpentine. 

Emmons, 8. F. Aspen, Colorado. 
Dolomization of limestones. 

Hunt. Origin of crystailioe rocks. 

Science. Hunt's mineral physiology, 
etc. 

Lawson. Metamorphism in Lake 
Superior region. 

Callaway. Hunt. Lawson. Par- 
allel structure in rocks. 

Lawson, Winchell, A. Foliation 
and sedimentation. 



Gheologlc Philosophy— Continued. 
Petrofraphji — Continued. 
Hunt. Genetic history of crystal- 
line msks. 
Earth omst moremenU and faults, 
Davis, W. M. Structure of Trias of 

Connecticut valley. 
Eldbidqe. Faults in Denver region, 

Colorado. 
Sbaubb. Crenitio hypothesis and 

mountain huilding. 
Duttok. Prohlems of physical geol- 
ogy. 
White, G. A. Mountain upthrnsts. 

Lb Conte. Origin of normal faults. 

Maroarie. 4pP^^^^^a<^ flexures in 
Pennsylvania. 

Hitchcock. Genesis of Hawaiian 
Islands. 

Dana, J. D. Origin of Oceanic de- 
pressions. 

Newberry. Earthquakes. 

Becker. Mechanism of faulting. 

Emmons, S. F. Origin of fissure 
veins [and faults]. 

Hrnrich. Is a faulted fissure always 
the oldest f 

KussELL, I. C. Great Basin struc- 
ture. 

Winchell, A. Effect of pressure of 
a continental glacier. 

Gilpin. Antidinals, Nova Scotia, 
gold region. 

Dana, J. D. Davis, W. M. Origin 
of mountain ranges. 

Stevenson. Faul ts of southwestern 
Virginia. 

DuTTON. 2uni plateau fault. 

DwiGHT. Warring. Evolution of 
continents. 

Wasmuth. Faults and flexures in 
Pennsylvania anthracites. 
Genesis of topography, 

McGee. Classification of geographic 
forms hy genesis. 

Davis, W. M. Geographic methods 
in geologic investigations. 

Davis, W. M. Methods and models 
in geographic teaching. 

C RANDALL. Pouttd Gap region , Ken- 
tucky. 

Eldridge. Denver region, Colorado. 

Webster. Central hasin of Iowa. 

Davis, W. M. Riven and valle:^s of 
Pennsylvania. 

McGee. Head of Chesapeake Bay. 



DASTCm.l 



BECOBD OF GfeOLOGT FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



77 



Gfreologic Philosophy— Cobtioned. 
Geae^M of topography — Coutinned. 
Davis, W. M. Topographio develop- 
ment of Trias of Coo uecticnt valley. 
McGbb. Macon Connty, Missonri. 

WiNCHKLLy N. H. Geology of Min- 
nesota. 

Chalmers. Northern New Brans- 
wick and southern Qnebec. 

Becker. Shape of volcanic cones. 

Davis, W. M. Classification of lakes. 

Davis, W. M. A river pirate. 

Lewis, H. C. Origin of extra-mo- 
rainal lakes and clays. 

Willis. Time and extent of Appal- 
achian nplift. 

Willis. Linnet. Relation of struc- 
ture to drainage and topography. 
" Willis. Bound about Asbeville. 

KiNAHAN. Origin of some old shore- 
lines. 

Shalbe. Seaooast swamps. 
Hydraulic degradation* 

HiNMAN. Meyer. Science. Laws 
of corrasion. 

Powell. Laws of hydraulic degra- 
dation. 
Volcanism, 

Dana, J. D. Hawaiian Islands. 

WiNCHELL, K. H. Thoughts o n 
ernptives. 

Dana, J. D. Yolcanization. 

Emmons, S. F. Leadville region; 
mechanism of intrusion. 

Hills. Eruptions in Spanish Peaks 
region, Colorado. 

Becker. Shape of volcanic cones. 

HovEY. Traps of East Haven- 
Brantford region, Connecticut. 

DuTTON. Mount Taylor region. 

Dana, E. S. Origin of volcanic stal- 
acties. 
Glaciation, 

Spencer, J. W. Glacier erosion in 
Norway. 

ROOERS. Philosophy of glacier mo- 
tion. 

Spencer, J. W. Theory of glacier 
motion. 

Bouv£. Potholes, Cohasset. 

Chamberlin, T. C. Rock scorings 
of the great ice invasion. 

Davis, W. M. Glacial origin of cliffs. 

Branner. Glaciation in Lacka- 
wanna-Wyoming region, Pennsyll- 
vania. 



Geologic Philosophy — Continued. 

OladatUm — Coutinned. ' 

^American Geologist. A new gla- 
cial theory. 

Davis, W. M. Wright. Ice age in 
North America. 

Hay, R. Manner of deposit of gla- 
cial drift. 

Upham. Structure of dnimlins.* 

Bell. Ice phenomena. 

Lewis. Origin of extra -moraiual 
lakes and days. 

Shaiar. History of some Nantucket 
glacial features. 

Kinahan. Origin of some old shore- 
lines. 
Genesis of mineral deposits. 

Attwood. Lithology of wall rocks, 
California. 

Becker. Quicksilver deposits of Pa- 
cific slope. 

Blake. Rainbow lode, Montana. 

Collins. Sudbury copper deposits, 
Canada. 

Blake. Copper basin, Arizona. 

Emmons, S. F. Structural relations 
of ore deposits. 

Emmons, S. F. Leadville region, 
Colorado. 

Ihlseng. Sau Juan region , Colorado. 

Dawson, G. M. Treadwell mine, 
Alaska. 

Lakes. Geology of Colorado ore 
deposit. 

Endlicu. Origin of gold deposits 
near Ouray. 

Raymond. Review of Emmons's 
Leadville report. 

Hills. Ores in Rocky Mountain re- 
gion. 

Brunton. Aspen Mountain, Colo- 
rado. 

Leggett. Rosario mine, Juancito, 
Central America. 

Clayton. Drnmlummon veins, 
Idaho. 

Van Hise. Iron ores of Penokee- 
Gogebic region. 

Lawson. Origin of ores of Keewa- 
tin, Minnesota. 

Browne. Luddington mine, Michi- 
gan. 

Comstock. West central Arkansas. 

Emmons, S. F. Origin and altera- 
tion of Colorado ores, ,, 



78 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.78L 



G-eologic Philosophy — Oontinaed. 
Genesis of mineral depoaita — Oontinaed. 

Emmons, S. F. Bntte, Montana. • 

Britton, Raymond. Arohean iron 
ores in New Jersey and New York. 

Newberry. Colorado oil fields [oil 
and gas]. 

J E N N E Y . Grapbitic anthracite, 
. Idaho. 

ASHBURNER. Petroleum and gas in 
New York. 

Bell. Petrolenm field of Ontario. 

Am. Geologist. Origin of petro- 
leum. 

Orton. Reports on Ohio [oil and 
gas]. 

Shaler. Petroleum and organic 
matter in rocks. 

Brown. Pyrite in bituminous coal. 

Newberry. Origin of graphite. 

Fulton. Iron ores, Menominee 
range. 

Am. Geologist. Origin of chert in 
Iowa coal measures. 

Penrose. Shaler. Origin of de- 
posits of phosphate of lime. 

Newberry. Bishop. Ochsenius. 
Origin of salt deposits. 

Weed. Siliceous sinter in thermal 
springs. 

Orton. Gypsum in Ohio. 

Tyrrell. Gypsum m Manitoba. 

Am. Geologist. Nathurst. Ward- 
roper. Formation of coal seams. 

Becker. Pacific slope. [Origin of 
nodules in sandstone.] 

Crosby. Quartzite and siliceous con- 
cretions. 
Coral formations, Agassiz. Am. Geolo- 

• GIST. Darwin. Dana, J. D. Heil- 
PRiN. Hicks. Morris. 
Miscellaneous. 

Claypole. Condition of interior of 
earth. 

Irving. Classification of early Cam- 
brian and pre-Cambrian. 

Campbell. Newberry. Webster. 
Origin of loess. 

Shaler. Origin of division between 
layers of stratified rocks. 

[Character of primitive earth crust], 
Becker. 

Reade. Physical theories of the 
earth in relation to. mountain for- 
mation. 



Gtoologic Philosophy — Contiii«ed. 

Miscellaneous — Continued. 

Spencer, J. W. Hummocks and 
bowlders of decomposition in Mis- 
Boori. 

Heilprin. Rate of deposition of ge- 
ologic formations. 

Bain. Permian climate. 

FoERSTB. Fence- wall geology. 

Williams, H. 8. Fossils in detcr- 
ing geologic. age. 

Geological and Scientifio BuUetiii, 
1888. 

Geology of Rio Grande valley, Owen. 
Coal in Texas, Streerdwitz. 
Mining districts in £1 Paso County, 

Texas, Cummins. 
Carboniferous formations in Texas, 

Cummins. 
Nacogdoches oil field, Dumble. 
(Jeology of western Texas. 

1889. 

Geological survey of Texas, Anon. 
• Drift at Gainesville, Texas, Rags- 
dale. 

Geology of Haldeman County, J. 
T.W. 

Geology of Gaines County, R. G. 

Gas well at San Antonio, Tait. 

Geology of Burnet County, Walker 

Building stones of eastern Texas, 
Penrose. 

Geological Magazine, voL 4. 

Borings in Manitoba, etc., Dawson, 
G.M. 

Cambrian of North America, Hicks. 

Cortlandt rocks, Harker. 

Elements of primary geology. Hunt. 

Gabbros, etc., of Baltimore region, 
Williams, G. H. 

Gustaldi on Italian geology. Hunt. 

Glaciation of North America, Great 
Britain and Ireland, Lewis. 

Parallel structure in rocks, Calla- 
way, 
voL 5. 

Eozoon Canadensis, Dawson, J. W. 

Glaciation of British Columbia, Daw- 
son, G.M. 

On Hindeastrsea, White, C. A. 

vol. 6. 



Graptolitesfrom Dease River, British 
Columbia, Lapworth. 

Richmond coal field, Yirginia, New- 
ell. 



BAHTOir.] 



BECORD OF GEOLOGT FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



79 



Geologioal Mas^azine, voL 6 — ConVd. 

Tnrrilepas in Uiic» ftt Ottawa, 

Woodward. 
Subaerial deposits of arid region of 
North Aroeriea, RuBSRLL. 
Glaciation of eastern Canada, Chal- 

Glaciation of high points, British 
Colxinibia, Dawson, G. M. 

Gheologioal Society, Quarterly Jour- 
nal, voL 44.- 

Huronian series near Sndbary, Can- 
ada, Bonnet. 

Eozoic and Paleozoio of the Atlantic 
coast of Canada [etc.], Dawson, 
J.W. 

Eqnivalency of Huron! an with Pebi- 
dian. Hicks. 

On the Sadbary copper deposits, 

COIXINS. 

Hnronian rocks at Sadbary, An- 

WOOD. 



vol. 45. 



Sappleiuent on rocks of Atlantic 
coast of Canada, Dawson, -J. W. 

Oeorgia, alnminnm ore, Nichols. 
Clinton fossils, Fobbste. 

coal, ASHBUBNER. 

formation of coal beds, Wardroper. 
Geological Survey, Spencer, J. W. 
Tertiary, Heilprin. 

QILBBRT, G. K. On a pre-historic 
hearth under the Quaternary deposits of 
western New York. 

Sd. Am. Snpt , vol. 23, pp. 9221-9222, No. 
677. 1887. 

Abstnot of i>aper read to WashiDgton Philo- 
fiophioal Society. Discasaion or the history 
ftnd drainage of the glacial Lake Ontario-Erie, 
and of the age of ih» drift dopoairs covering 
the hearth. 

The work of the International Con- 
gress of Geologists. 

Am. Jonr. Sd., 8d series, voL 84, pp. 430- 
451. 1887. 

Natm, vol. 37, pp. 19-2?, 40-43. 1887. 

Am. Aaaoo. Adv. 8oi., Proc, vol. 36, pp. 
188-206. 1888. 

Abstract, Canadian Record of Science, 
voL 2, pp. 510-514. 1887. 

Reviewed by P. Fraser, Am. Natnralist, 
vol. 21, pp. 841-847. 1887. 

Disoasses geologic, chronologic, and classi- 
ficatory terminology, the equivalency, ayn* 
chronism, and extent of "stratigraphic sys- 
tems," and the defect in nniversal synchronic 



GILBERT, G. K.— Continned. 

nniformity in conditions of dcpoHitiou, life, 
and gcolofiic phenomena over wide are.iR, in 
opposition to the •' World wide" classiflmtion 
of geologic snhdivisions. Keviews tht« color 
scheme adoptt'd by the CongrcHs, and uftcr 
discussing ilio csHontials and means of map 
coloring, suggests the adoption of the pris- 
matio system. 

[Stages of geologic history of Sierra 

Nevada.] 

Washington Phil. Soc, Bull., vol. », p. 7, 
ip. 1887. 

Kemarks following paper by J. S. Dillcr 
on the geology of northern California. 

-^— Old shore lines in the Ont.irio basin. 

Canadian Inst., Proc, 3d series, vol. 6, pu- 
2-4. 1888. 

hketch of literature. Describes search fur 
terraces from Aurora to Torouto. 

Changes of level of the Great Lakes. 

The Forum , vol. 5, pp. 417-428. 1888. 
Includes a sketch of the history of tho 
Great Lakes. 

[Views in regard to the work of the 



International Congress.] 

International Oongress of Greologists, Am. 
Oommittee Report, 1888, pp. 73-74, ^ p. 

Discussion of its scope, proposed nomencla- 
ture, and color scheme. 

— Beaches of Lake Ontario, see 



CHAMBERLIN. Report on glacial 
geology. 

GILL, A. C. Potrographical notes on a 
rock collection from Fernando Noronhn. 

Johns Hopkins Univ. Circulars, vol. 7, pp. 
71-72, No. 65. 1888. 

Phonolites, nepholino-basaiitites, ucplie. 
line-basalt, nopholinito, and basalt glass. 

GhlLFIN, ICdwin J. Notes on the lime- 
stones of East River, I'ictou, Nova 
Scotia. 

Canada Royal Soc, Trans., vol. 4, Section 
IV, pp. 159-166, plat»ai. 4^ 1887.' 

Describes tho distribution and relations of 
Carboniferous limestones. Analyses. 

The Carboniferous of Capo Breton, 

Part II. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Proc, vol. 7, pp. 24-35. 
1688. 

Stratigraphic and structural relations, and 
extent of coal bsiHiuH. Referonrc to associnteil 
Devonian and pro-Cambrian rocka. 

The Carboniferons of Capo Breton 



with introductory remarks, l*art 111. 



80 



RECORD OF GEOLOGT FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 78. 



GhlLPIN, Edwin J. — Contioned. 

Noya Sootimn Inst. , Proo. , vol. 7. pp. 100-117. 
1888. 

Sketcli of oonditioDs suppoaed to hAve 
existed in the reii^on during CarboniferonB 
times. Description of general strnotnral 
relations. Analyses of tbe coals and refer- 
ences to their thicknesses and relations at 
some points. 

The faults and foldings of the Pictoa 

coal field. 

Canada, Roy. Soc., Trans., yoL 5, Section 
IV, pp. 25-30, 4°. 18K8. 

Discassion of relatioas of the flMilts to the 
folds and the history of the development of 
the structure of the region; the former extent 
of the coal series ; the age and relations of the 
folds and faults in the underlying Silurian 
and Camhro-Silurian, and the date of the 
granitic intrusions. 

Notes on the Nova Scotia gold veins. 

Canada, Royal Soc., Trans., voL 6^ Section 
IV, pp. 63-70, pi. 3. 4°. 1880. 

Prefaced by a brief account of the anrifer- 
ons series and discussion of the mechanism 
of an ideal anticlinaL 

The geology of Cape Breton. The 

minerals of the Carboniferous. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Froc, voL 7, pp. 214- 
226. 1880. 

Includes brief accounts of occurrence of 
gypsum, iron-ores, limestone, and building 
stones. 

Ghlasgo'w Geological Society, Transac- 
tions, vol. 8. 
Geology of Idaho, Thomson. 

GOODALE, Charles W. The occur- 
rence and treatment of the argentifer- 
ous manganese ores of Tombstone dis- 
trict, Arizona. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
17, pp. 767-774. 1889. 

Includes a brief reference to the geologic 
relations of the district. 

[GOODFBLLOVSr, George E.] The 
Sonora earthquake. 

Science, voL 11, pp. 162-166. 1888. 
Description of great fault and other dis- 
turbances due to the earthquake. 

GOODTEAR, W. A. Petroleum, as- 
phaltnm, and natural gas. 

California, Seventh Report of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 63-114. 1888. 

Description of bituminous rocks and some 
of their relations in Contra Costa, Fresno, 
Kern, Los Angeles, Monterey, Santa Barbara, 
San Bernardino, Snnta Clara, Santa Cruz, San 
Luis Obispo, San Mateo, and Ventnra coun- 
ties. 



GOODTBAR, W. A.- CantiBiied. 
Coal. 

Oalifomia, S«v«Bth Bsport of State Miner- 
aloginpP'U7-17& 1888. 

Reprint of **The eosl Miaes of the western 
coast of the United StstM," with additiooa and 
oorreotiiHis up to 1887. 

Inyo County. 

OaiifiDmia, Bightii Eeport of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 221-300. 1888. 

Description af relations and stmeiore of 
metamorphlo, granitio, and volcanie forma- 
tifOns in parts of the eoonty , anil diseosaion of 
the nature and relations of the gnuiites. In- 
cludes a paper by J. D. Whitney (pp. 28a- 
809), OB "The Oweos Talley Sarthquake,'* 
TeinriBted fhwi the ** Overland Monthly, *' 1372. 

Kern bounty. 

Oaliibniia, Eightii Eeport of Stale Miner- 
alogist, pp. 809^^04. I8B& 

Beferenoes to granitio, metamorphlo, Ter- 
tiary, and volcanic rooks and sbmotnre at 
varioas looalitiea. 

Los Angeles County. 

California. Eighth Report of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 335-842. 1888. 

R^erenoes to getdc^o relations at various 
localities and along several routes. Tertiary, 
Cretaceous, superficial deposits, and granitio 
and metamorphosed rooks. 

San Bernardino Connty 

California, Eighth Report of State Miner- 
•logist, pp. 604-512. 1838. 

References to granites, limestones, meta- 
morphics, sandstones, voUsaaios, and strnot- 
nral relations at various localities. 

San Diego County. 

California, Eighth Report of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 510-S28. 1888. 

Beferenoes to granitio and metamorphie 
rocks. Tertiary sandstones, dips, terraces, and 
superficial deposits. 

Tulare County. 

California, Eighth Report of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 643-652. 1888. 

Includes some brief references to granites 
and metamorphosed rooks, dips at variona 
points, the metamorphlo nature of the gran- 
ites, snd reprint of a paper, '' Notes on the 
high Sierra sonth of Mount Whitney," from 
CaL Acad. Sci., Proc., Nov., 1873. 

GORLBT, S. S. Geology of Tippecanoe 
County. 

Indiana, Department of GeoL and Kat, 
Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 61-96. 1886. 

Describes formations from Niagara to lower 
ooal measures, conglomerate, and diifL Dis- 
cusses origin of some topo|^aphio and drain- 
age features. 

Geology of Washington County. 



DABTON.J 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



81 



GOULEY, S. S.^Continned. 

Indiana, Department of Gl-eol. and. Nat 
Eiat, Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 117-153, 
plate. 1886. 

Describes the distribution, topography, 
stmokire, fossils, and stratigraphy of the 
Chester, St. Loais, Keokak, Barlington, and 
Knobstone groups, and the superficial clays 
and sand. Discusses the equivalency of some 
' of tiie formations. 

Geolo^ of Benton County. 

Indiana, Department of Gkol. and Nat 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 108-220. 
188«. 

Detdibea the B^eohuk^and St. Louis lime- 
stones, the conglomerate sandstones, and the 
drift d^M>8its. Discusses the character of 
certain drift ridges and gives a nnmber of 
bored-well records in various parts of the 
county. 



The Wabash aroh. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist, Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 228-241. 
1886. 

Describes a low anticlinal, extending along 
the course of the Wabash Biver from the 
Ohio line through Indiana, and into Illinois. 
Gives an account of the associated structaral 
fiBatnres, faults, flexures, Jointing, and cone^in- 
cone stmcture. Discusses the age of the up- 
Hft, which is thought to have taken place in 
the latter part of the upper Silurian. 

and ZiBE, S. E. (Geology of Boone 

Coanty. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat 
Hist, Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 160-176. 
1886. 

Describe its drift deposits, which, in one 
region, are thought to be morainal in charac- 
ter. Give a nomber of well records and 
state their opinions in regard to the underly- 
ing rocks of the county. 

GORDON, C. H. [Well at Keokak, 

Iowa.] 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, p. 362, i p. 1888. 
Beferraoe to horison of supposed Niagara 
sandstone and to the occurrence of a similar 
sandstone in wells at Albert Lea, Minnesota, 
and Washington, Iowa. 

[Notice of deep boring at Keokak. ] 

Am. Geologist, voL 4, p. 127, i p. 1889. 
Beforenoe to beds passed through at depths 
fiKMn 1,060 to 1,770 feet. 

Notes on the geology of southeastern 

Iowa. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 237-239. 1889. 

Gives records of some deep borings and 
o<»nment8 on the more noteworthy strati- 
grai^o evidence they present. 

ORANT, Uly. S. £eport of geological 
obsenrations made in northeastern 
Minnesota daring the snmmer of ISSd, 

Ball 76 6 



GRANT, Uly. S.— Continued. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Seventeenth Report, pp. 149-215. 1889. 

Itinerary notes, maiuly on the re^on from 
Yermilion Lake east to Gunflint Lake, and 
relating mostly to relations of the gabbro and 
red syenite, and magnetite quartzito at 
Frazer and Thomas lakes. 

QRATACAP, Louis P. [Microscopic 
nature and origin of Staten Island ser- 
pentines.] 

Staten Island, Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, May 
14, 1887, 2d leaf. 

Discusses tbe several theories of serpentine 
formation and presents facts indicative of 
the derivation from homblendic rocks of tbe 
serpentine of Staten Island. 

Preliminary list of Paleozoic fossils 

found in the drift of Staten Island. 

Staten Island, Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, [Jan. 
8, 1887,] extra, No. 6, 2 leaves. 
From Potsdam to upper Helderberg. 

The eozooual rock of Manhattan 

Island. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. [33, pp. 374- 
378. 1887. 

Describes the occurrence and literature of 
the belt of serpentines on New York Island, 
giving an account of tboir micropetrography 
and discussing the origin of their constitueuc 
minerals. Evidence is presented which is 
thought to indicate the probable inorganic 
character of the eozoonal structure. 

[Notice of occurrence of bowlder of 



Oriskany sandstone on Staten Island.] 

4 

Staten Island, Nat. Sci. Assoc, Proc, 
March, 1889. 

AnL Naturalist, voL 23, pp. 549-550, | p. 
1889. 

Includes a list of the twenty species of 
fossils which it contained. 

GhREGG, A. Economic minerals of San 
Saba County. 
. Texas, Grcol. and Mineralogical Survey, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 74-76. 1889. 

Includes geologic notes, mainly in regard 
to the marbles near San Saba. 

GhREEN, W. Spotswood. Explorations 
in the glacier region of the Selkirk 

range, British Columbia. 

Royal Geog. Soc, Proc, vol. 11, pp. 153-169. 
1889. 

Includes some brief references to nature of 
rocks, terraces, and evidence of glaciation. 

GRESLEy, W. S. Formation of coal- 
seams. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 45, p. 338, i 
col, 4°. 1888. 

Discusses method of accumlation of mater- 
ials. 



82 



BECOED OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



tBUIiL.75. 



H. 



[HAQG-IN, J. B.] Becord of strata in 
artesian well. [Kern County.] 

Oalifomia, Sixth Annual Beport of th« 
Mineralogist, part I, pp. 50-57. 1886. 

Through gravels, sands, and clays to 650 
feet in one well and 472 feet in the other. 

HAGUE, Arnold. Beport • • • Yel- 
lowstone Park division. 

IT. S. Grool. Sonrey, Sixth Annual Report, 
1884-85, pp. 54-59. 1885. 

Incidentally refers to some geologic features 
of the park. 

Geological history of the Yellowstone 

National Park. 

Am. Inst. Mining Eng^eers, Trans., voL 
16 pp., 783-803. 1888. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, vol. 36, 
pp. 282-283, i p. 1889. 

Beferences to geology of surrounding 
ranges, pre-Tertiary uplifts, glaciation, rock 
decomposition, and antiquity and rate of 
growth of hot spring deposits, and sketch of 
Tertiary volcanic history of the park. 

[On the Archean and its subdivi- 
sions.] 

International Congress of Gr-eologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 66-67. 

Discusses the distinctness of the Archean 
as a system, separat^ness of the Huronian, 
and the subdivision and classification of 
ernptives in the Archean. 

— ] [On the use of the term **Ta- 



X 



conic."] 

International Congress of Grcologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 2 lines. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Suggestion in regard to its application. 

— — Notes on the occarrence of a leucite 
rock in the Absaroka range, Wyoming 
Territory , 

Am. Jour. Sci.,3d series, vol. 38, pp. 43-47. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, p. 811, i p. 
1889. 

Account of a bowlder of leucite rock,- and 
discussion of its petrography, composition, 
and origin. Includes a petrographio descrip- 
tion by J. P. Iddings, an analysis by J. E. 
Whitfield, and a list of localities of leucite- 
bearing rocks in various parts of the world. 

HALL, C. W. A brief history of copper 
mining in Minnesota. 

Minnesota, Acad. Sci., Bull., vol. 3, part 1, 
pp. 105-111. 1889. 

Prefaced by an account of the Keweenawan 
formation, and brief discussion of its extent 
in Minnesota. 



HALL, C. W.^Continned. 

The lithologioal characters of the 

Trenton limestone of Minneapolis and 
St. Paal| with a note on the borings of 
the West Hotel artesian well. 

Minnesota, Acad. Soi., BnlL, voL 3, part 1, 
pp. 111-124, pi. 1. }888. 

DetaUed description of Trenton Mid the un« 
derlying St Peters sandstone in the vicinity of 
the city. Analyses. Well record. Reference 
to glacial strias and thickness of drift. 

The geological conditions which 

control artesian well borings in south- 
eastern Minnesota. 

Minnesota, Aoad. Soi., BnlL, vol. 3, part 1, 
pp. 128-143.pl. 2. 1889. 

Includes an account of tiie stratigraphy of 
the region, and records of a dozen wells. 

The distribution of the granites of 

the Northwestern States and their gen- 
eral lithologic characters. [Abstract. ] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, vol. 37, pp. 
189-190. 1889. 

List of localities, summary of petrographio 
characteristics, and reference to age. 

Field notes on the geology of the 

Mohawk valley. See [Beecher, C.E., 
and Hall, C. E. T] 

HALL, James. Report on building 
stones. 

New York, Thirty-ninth Report State Mu- 
seum of Nat. Hist. , 1886, pp. 1 J6-227. 1886. 

Description of some of the gneisses, gran- 
ites, and marbles of New York and New £ng« 
land and the limestones and sandstones of 
New York. Discusses the qualities, selec- 
tion, and causes of decay in building stones. 

Report of the State Geologist. 

New York, Thirty-ninth Report State Mn- 
seum of Nat. Hist. , 1885, pp. 226-227. 1 886. 

New York, Sixth Report of the Geologist, 
1886, pp. 5-9. 1887. 

Includes an account of contacts of Laureu- 
tlan gneisses and overlying rocks near Little 
Falls, and a statement in regard to the hori- 
zon of the Oneouta sandstone. 



— [On the nomenclature of the Ameri- 
can lower Paleozoic. ] 

International Congress of G-eologists, Am , 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, p. 10, f p. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, p. 200. 1888. 

On the adoption of exclusively European 
terms, and the application of the term ** Ta- 



conic. 



II 



DABTON.j 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



83 



[BANKS, Henry. ] Building stones and 
building materials in California. 

Oalifomia, Sixth Annual Report of the Min- 
eralogist, part 1, pp. 16-34. 1888. * 

Description of well knoim building stones 
and of California localities. Qives partial 
analyses of a dunyte from Sai\ Diego County 
and a sandstone fh>m Santa Barbara. 

[ ] Mount St. Helena. 

Oalifomia, Sixth Annual Report of the Min- 
eralogist, part 1, pp. 78-70, 2 plates. 1886. 

Description of outcrop of columnar basalt. 
Considers the mountain an old volcano, but 
finds no evfdence pf a crater. 

] San Diego County. 

OalUomia, Sixth Annual Report of the Min- 
eralogist, part 1, pp. 80-00, map. 1886. 

Incidental giH>logio and mineralogio notes. 
Describes fold in slate* in mine at Banner. 
Accompanied by a colored geologic map of 
the county, provisionally illustrating the dis- 
tribution of Quaternary, Tertiary, Permo- 
Carboniferous, and Archean. 

t. ] California minerals. 

Oalifomia, Sixth Annual Report of the Min- 
eralogist, part 1, pp. 91-141. 1886. 

Includes descriptions of some localities of 
lignite, various kinds of quartz, limestones, 
and serpentines. 

On the occurrence of hanksite in 

California. * 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 63-66. 
1889. 

Beferences to various localities and record 
of 300-foot bore-hole Into volcanic sand, and 
lacustrine deposits underlying Borax Lake. 

HARDEN, Oliver B. See PROSSER, 
A. G., and. ^ 

HARKER, Alfred. The Cortlandt 
rocks. 

Geol. Magazine, 8d decade, voL 4, pp. 431- 
432. i p. 1887. 

Calls attention to Callaway's oversight of 
the present views of Dana and Williams in 
regard to the probable eruptive nature of 
some of the Cortlandt rocks which Dana at 
Unt considered metamorphic. 

HARRODy B. M. Archean rocks in 
Texas. 

New Orleans Acad. SoL, Papers, vol. 1, 
No. 2, pp. 181-138. 1888. 

Brief references to outcrops and character- 
istics. 

Harvard, Maseum Comparative Zool- 
ogy, Bulletin, voL 16. 

Dike of diabase in Boston babin, 

HOBBS. 

Cambrian district of Bristol County, 
Massachasetts, Sualeu. 



Harvard Museum Comparative Zool- 
ogy, Bulletin, voL 16— Continned. 
Fossil ulants from Golden, Colorado, 

Lesquereux. 
Faults in Trias near Merideu, Con- 
necticut, Davis. 
Triassic trap sheets of Connecticut 
valley, Davis and Whittle. 

vol. 17. 

Coral reefs of Hawaiian Islands, Agas- 
siz. 

Harvard Museum Comparative Zool- 
ogy, Memoirs^ voL 16, No. 2. 

Connection of eastern and western 
coal fields, Ohio valley, Sualeu. 

Ha'walian Islands, 
coral reefs, Aoassiz. 
genesis, Hitchcock. 
Halema'uua'u and its debris con^, 

Dana, J. D. 
Mount Lua craters, Bakeb. Dana, 

J. D. Merritt. 
Petrography, Dana, E. S. 

HAWORTH, Erasmus. A contribution 
to the Archean geology of Missouri. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 11, pp. 280-297, 363-382, 
port 1. 1888. 

Abstracts, Johns Hopkins Univ., Oircolars, 
vol.7,pp. 70-71, No.65. 4°. 1888. Am. Nat- 
uralist, vol. 22, pp. 739, 838. } p. 

General descrfption of relations of the mas- 
sive rocks to each other and to the stratified 
rocks, and petrographio description of gran- 
ites, porphyries, and diabases. 

HA7, O. P. On the manner of deposit 
of the glacial drift. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 52-58. 
1887. 

Statement of the views of Dana, the Oei- 
kies, Newberry, and N. H. Winchell. Dis- 
cnsses the action of the glacier on its bed, 
in general and aoder varying circumstances, 
and the mode of accumulation of drift-mate< 
rial at its base and in the terminal moraine. 

The northern limit of the Mesozoic 

rocks in Arkansas. 

Arkansas, GS-eol. Survey, Report for 1888, 
vol. 2, pp. 261-290. 1888. 

Descriptions of outcrops, and relations of 
the Cretaceous in the vicinity of the Mesozoic- 
Paleozoic boundary line. 

A geological section in Wilson 

County, Kansas. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 10, pp. 6-8, 
plate. 1888. 

Discussion of rate of dip, evidence of a 
fault, and equivalency of the Dun limestone 
with the Humboldt limestone. 



84 



RECORD OF QEOLOQY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL. 76. 



, O. P.— Continued. 

— Report on geology. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., v^ 10, pp. 21-22. 
1888. • 

Disousbion of the eastern extension of the 
Tertiary in southern Kansas, and the eqniva- 
lency and bonndary of the red rocks and gyp* 
sum in the region extending from Comanche 
County to Medicine Lodge. 

— N«tnral gas in eastern Kansas. 

Kansas Acad. 8oi , Trans , yoL 10, pp. 57- 
62, plate. 1888. 

. Abstract from Fifrh Report of State Board 
of Agricnltnre. 

Reference to geologic position of gas-yield- 
ing beds. Gives sections at Fort Scott, and 
refers to the stratigraphic and structural re- 
lations in that vicinity. Partial section from 
Fort Scott, Kansas, to Xovada, Missouri, on 
plate. 

— Note on a remarkable fossil. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 10, pp. 12^ 
129, i p., plate. 1888. 

Includes brief discussion of the derivation 
of the enclosing concretion in its bearing on 
the location of the former eastern boundary of 
the Cretaceous. 

— Horizon of the Dacotah lignite. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans. , voL 11, pp. 5-8. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 5, pp. 249-250, 
5 lines. 1890. 

References to the relations, stratigraphy 
and distribution of the Dacotah group, ond 
discussion of evidence bearing on the horizon 
of the iignitic beds. 

— Lecture. Tlie geology of Kansas. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 11, pp. 36-37. 
1889. 

References to distribution and relations of 
the Jura- Trias, Cretaceous, and Tertiary. 

— The Triassic rocks of Kansas. [Ab- 



stract.] 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 11, pp. 3&-39, 
J p. 1889. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, voL 5, p. 250, 3 
lines. 1890. 

References to their relations to the Perrao- 
Carboniferons and absence of unconformity 
at their base. 

— Recent discoveries of rock salt in 
Kansas. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, voL 37, pp. 
184-185. 1889. 

Statements in regard to its stratlgraphic 
position and relations, and brief sketch of the 
Permian-*' Dacotah" history of the region. 

— and THOMPSON, A. H. Histor- 
ical sketch of geological work in the 
State of Kansas. 



HAY, O. P. —Continued. 

- Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., ToLl0,pp.4S- 
02. 1688. 

Statements of the condnsicniii of each ob- 
server, and description of some nnpabltshed 
papers in whieh information is given in regard 
to the eastern dip of the strata in the eastern 
part of th^ State, and the now known oider 
of Kansas formations. 



HAYDBN, F.V. Report 
Montana division. 



IT. S. Geol. Surrey, Sixth Report, J. W. 
PoweU. 1884- '85, pp. 48-63. 1885. 

Statement of results of studies in the re- 
gion between the Bridjger or East Gallatin 
range and the three forks of the Missouri 
Briefly describes the slamctnre and strati- 
graphy of the several formations — including 
the newly discovered Devonian— the lake de- 
posits of the Gallatin valley, and the drift. 

— Report • . . • • Montana di- 



vision of geology. 

IT. S. G-eol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 86-87. 1888. 

Keference to relations of formations from 
Cambrian to Carboniterons and ooals, and 
evidence of glacial action in the Gallatir 
range region, and to the volcanie constitu- 
ents, age, origin, and relations of the lake 
beds of Gallatin valley. 

HEADDEI7, William P. [Notice of a 
thin bed of infusorial earth in west Den- 
ver.J 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Proc, vol. 2, p. 183, \ p. 
1888. 

HEILPRIN, Angelo. Explorations on 
the west coast of Florida and in the 
Okeechobee wilderness, with special 
reference to the geology and zoology of 
the Floridian peninsula. 

Wagner Inst, Trans., voL 1, pp i-viii, 1-134, 
pis. II, 1-19. 1887. 

Abstracts, Am. Jonr. ScL, 3d series, vol. 34, 
pp, 230-232. 1887. Popular Science Monthly, 
vol. 33, p. 418, 4 p. 1887. 

Describes outcrops and occurrence of fos- 
sils. Summarises ohaervations on rocks of 
Homosassa, Ghef^howiska, Pithlachasoootie, 
Manatee, and Caloosahatohee rivers, Tampa 
Bay, Hillsboro, and Sarasota Bay. Discusses 
literature, extent, equivalency, and paleon- 
tology of the subdivisions of the Tertiary; 
the coral-reef theory, and the general geologic 
history of the peninsula. Gives a table show- 
ing the relations of the "Atlantic and Gulf 
coast Tertiaries of the United States.*' 

[On the classification of the Tertiary 

deposits.] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, F, pp. 12>14. 



DABTOM.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



85 



HEILPRIN, Angelo— CSntinned. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 278-280. 1888. 
Diacnssion of upper limit of Tertiary and 
nomenclatare. 

[ ] [Remarks on P. R. Uhler's paper 

on the Alboripean and associated for- 
mations in Maryland.] 

Am. FhiL Soo. , Proo. , rol. 25, p. 54, i p. No. 
127. 1888. 

Expression of opinion that part of the "Al- 
birapean" is Paleozoic, and in regard to the 
age of the Potomac formation. 

The Miocene mollasca of the State 

of New Jersey. 

Philadelphia Acad. Sol., Proc, 1887, p. 
397. 

lists of fossils, notes on new and old spe- 
cies, and expression of opinion regarding age 
and equivalency of the Miocene members at 
Shiloh and in the Atluitio City well. 

[ — ] Determination of the age of rock 
deposits. 

Philadeli^a Acad. Sci., Proo., 1887, p. 
395. 
Discussion of rates of deposition. 

— The classification of the post-Creta- 
ceous deposits. 

Philadelphia Acad. Sci., Proo., 1888, pp. 
314-322. 

Review of faunal relations and equivalency 
of the Tertiary formations mainly in the Uni- 
ted States; and discussion of the value of the 
faunal element in geologic chronology. 

The Bermuda Islands; a contriba- 

tion to the physical history and zoology 
of the Somers Archipelago, with an ex- 
amination of the stractore of coral 
reefs, pp. 231, pis. 17. Philadelphia. 
1889. 

Includes an account of their geology and 
physiography, a discussion o6 the coral-reef 
problem, and a review of recent literature on 
coral reefs. 

— On Archean. See FRAZER. Re- 
port on the Archean. 

HENRICH, Carl. The San Pedro cop- 
per mine in New Mexico. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 43, p. 183. 4P. 
1887. 

Statement of character and dip of contain- 
ing limestones. 

— The copper ore deposits near Mo- 
renci, Arizona. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 43, pp. 202-203, 
219-220. 40. 1887. 

Description of geologic relations of contain- 
ing formations. 



HENRICH, Carl—CoDtinned. 
Some forms of ore deposits in lime- 
stone. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 46, pp. 368-369. 
4''. 1888. 

Reference to attitude and evidences .of in- 
ternal erosion of limestones inclosing lead 
ores in Morgan County, Missouri, and Beaver* 
head County, Montana. 

The United and Champion copper 



mines of New Zealand. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 46, pp. 414-416. 
40. 1888. 

Description of geologic relations of great 
"Serpentine" dikes in which the ores occur. 

— Metamorphism in rocks. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol.46, p. 461, | p. 
40. 1888. 

DiHCusses the agency of highly heated un- 
derground waters under great pressure. 

— Notes on the geology and on some 
of the mines of Aspen Mountain, Pit- 
kin County, Colorado. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 156-206. 1889. 

Stratigraphy of beds from Cambrian to 
Carboniferous, structural relations, faults, in- 
trasives, and ore deposits. Mainly a discus- 
sion of structural relations. 

— The Slaybacb lode— a peculiar kind 
of fissure vein. 

Eng. and Mining Jour, , vol. 48, p. 27, } p. 
A°. 1889. 

Includes some statements in regard to re- 
lations of associated volcanic rocks, and dikes. 

— Is a faulted fissure always the old- 



est? A study of faults. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 48, p. 159, i p. 
40. 1889. 
Discussion of mechanism of crossed faults. 

HERRICK, C. L. A sketch of the 
geological history of Licking County, 
accompanying an illustrated catalogue 
of Carboniferous fossils from Flint 
Ridge, Ohio. 

Denison Univ., Bull., vol. 2, pp. 5-68, pis. 
I-vi, pp. 144-148. 1887. 

Detailed description of the geologic rela- 
tions, the outcrops, structure, and character- 
istics of the Waverly and immediately over- 
lying rocks. Discusses the mode and rate of 
deposition of the formations, the origin of 
their materials, and their paleontologic rela- 
tions. Gives structural and columnar sec- 
tions. 

The geology of Licking County, 



Ohio, part in. 



86 



EECOlto OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



IBI 



EHEiRRICK, ^. L.— Con tinned. 

Denison ITniT., BnU.| ToL3,pp.l3-110,pl8. 
I-Xli. 1888. 

Abstracts, Am. Jour. Sci., toI. 87, pp. 317- 
318, 1 p., 1880; Am aeologist, voL 8, p. 50, | p. 
1889. 

Discussion of the stratifn^Aphio position and 
range of the Waverly and description of its 
stratigrapliy, paleontology, and inclination, 
and of eyidence of local unconformity in the 
anb-Carbonlferons at some points. List of 
fossils, pp. 27-37. 

Geology of Licking Connty, part iv. 

Denison Dnlyersity, Ball., voL 4, pp. 11-60, 
^97-123. pis. I-XI. 1888. 

Abstracts, Am. Jonr. Sol., 8d series, vol. 37, 
pp. 317-318, I p., 1889; Am. Geologist, toL 3, 
p. 50, 1 p. 1889. 

Pages 11-60 and 114-123, descriptions and 
lists of fossils. 

Pages 97-114, discussion of stratigraphy of 
'Waverly and associated series. 

Notes on the Waverly gronp in Ohio. 

Am. Geologist, yoL 3, pp. 94-99, pis. l-iv. 
1889. 

Discussion of the eqaivalency, taxonomy, 
and paleontologio relations of the Waverly 
members. 

CLARKE, E. S. andDEMINa,J. L. 



Some American norytes and gabbros. 

Am.Geologi8t, vol. 1, pp. 339-346, pi. 1888. 

Discussion of the modifications induced in 
basic eruptives by the interpenetrated rocks 
and description of occurrence and petrog- 
raphy of olivine noryte and adjacent rocks 
near Marshall, Koith Carolina, the Duluth 
gabbros and the garnetiferous gabbros from 
Granite Falls, Minnesota. Review of Wads- 
worth on the origin of diorites. 

TIGHT, W. G. and JONES, H. L. 

Geology and lithology of Michipicoton 

Bay. 

Denison Univ., Boll., vol. 2, pp. 119-143, pis. 
10-13. 1887. 

Abstracts, Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 
34, p. 12, I p. 1887; Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, 
pp. 654-655, pis. 22-23, 1887, (by Herrick?) 

After reviewing the work of previous ob- 
servers, especially McFarlan, describe the 
geologic features of the region and the micro- 
petrography and mode of occurrence of a 
series of rock specimens. Discuss the nature, 
relative positions, stratigraphic and structural 
relations, variations and equivalency of the 
Laurentian, Huronian, and Keweenawan 
series. Illustrated by maps and structural 
and micro-rock sections. 

HEWUTT, G. C. The northwestern Col- 
orado coal region. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
17, pp. 37&-380. 1889. 



', G.'C. — Continued. 
Statement in regard to geologic horiz 
distribution of the coals and the t 
stratigraphy of the region. Notice c 
recent lava flows. 



I, Henry. The Cambrian ro 
North America. 

G«ol. Mag., 3d decade, vol. 4, pp. 1 
1887. 

Summarization of Walcott*s views 
nse of the term Cambrian and the faun 
stratigraphic relations and equivalency 
subdivisions of the formation* 

[Remark on equivalency oi 

Huronian ^ith the Pebidian.] 

Geol. Soc, Quart. Jonr., vol. 44, p. 8 

1888. 

HICKS, Lewis £. [Diatomaceous 
on North Loup River, Nebraska.] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, p. 136, ^ p. 18 
Notice of its occurrence and thickne 

Geyserite in Nebraska. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 277-280, vo 
437. 1888. 

Beference to occurrences of volcan- 
in Nebraska, and extracts from "P! 
geography and geology of Nebraska, 
by Samuel Aughey on polishing powde 
supposed infusorial earth and geyser f 

The reef- builders. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 297-305. IS 
Discussion of the theories of Darw 
Murray. 

[Volcanic dusts from Krakatoj 



from Nebraska and Kansas. ] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 64, \ p. 1888 
Beference to evidence of their v< 
nature. 

— [Quartzite between Niobran 
0*Nei], Nebraska, and its relati 
the Valentine quartzite.] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 351-352, | p. 

Reference to occurrence of quai-t: 
road from Niobrara to O'Neil, Nebrasl 
discussion of its age and equivalenc; 
the Tertiary quartzite at Yalentiui 
braska. 

— Diatomaceous earth in Nebrasl 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 35, p. : 
1888. 

List of species. Brief reference to n 
occurrence. 

— Soils of Nebraska as related t< 
logical formations. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 36-45. 188S 
Includes a preliminary geologic ma 
sketch of the geology of the State. 



l^kx^'^A 



B.^COB.D 0¥ GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



87 



HILGARD, £. W. The eqairalenoe in 
time of American marine and intra- 
oontinental Tertiaries. 

Science, vol. 9, pp. 525-^36. 1887. 

Calls Attention to the opportanitiee afforded 
for the determination of the relations of 
interior and gulf Tertiaries, in the region 
between and adjacent to the Red and Arkan- 
sas rirers. Discusses tiie correlation of 
some of the members of tiie two series. 

[On the use of the term ** Oligocene'' 

in the galf region.] 

International Congress of GeologistSi Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, F, p. 7, 6 lines. 
Am. Geologist, toI. 2, p. 273. 1888. 
Opinion in regard to its inapplicability. 

[On the relations of the Grand Galf 

series.] 

International Congress of G^eologists, Am. 
Committee Eeports, 1888, E, pp. 8-9. 
Am. Otologist, voL 2, pp. 274-275. 1888. 
To associated and correlated formations. 

[On the inclusion of "Qaaternary" 



in the Tertiary.] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, F, pp; 14-15, \ p. 
Am. Geologist, toL 2, pp. 280-281. 1888. 
Statement of opinion. 

Agriculture and late Quaternary 

geology. 

Science, vol. 11, pp. 241-242, } p. 1888. 
Descriptions of evidence of an ancient 
drainage system in the npper San Joaquin 
valley, Califomia. 

HILL, Frank A. Geology and mining 
in the northern coal-field of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
16, pp. 699-707. 1887. 
General description of the geologic features. 

Report on the Anthracite region. 

Pennsylvania, Report of Geol. Survey, 1886, 
part 3, pp. 919-1329, 4 plates, 7 sheets in atlas. 
1887. 

Description of northern and western-middle 
coal-flelds and discussion of structural and 
stratigraphio relations in some parts of the 
areas, pp. 925-1007. Sections in northern and 
eastern and western-middle fields. 

— Lehigh River section continued from 
Lock 11, southward to the Blue Moun- 
tain. 

Pennsylvania, Report of GeoL Survey, 1886, 
part 4, pp. 1372-1385. 1887. 

Detailed description of the stratigraphy of 
beds from Pooono to top of Loraine slate, and 
of the structural relations of the region. 
Beference to glacial drift and strias. 



, Frank A.— Continued. 

— Report on the metallic paint ores 
along the Lehigh River. 

Pennsylvania, Report of Geol. Surrey, 1886, 
part 4, pp, 1386-1408, sheet 6 in atlas. 1887. 

Description of geologic relations, structure 
of paint beds, and sections in mines. 

— Atlas southern anthracite field, part 
2. Pennsylvania Geol. Survey, AA. 
13 sheets. Harrisburg. 1889. 

Colored geologic maps. 

— Atlas eastern middle anthracite field, 
part 3, Pennsylvania Geol. Survey, 
AA. 13 sheets. Harrisburg, 1889. 

Colored geologic maps, and columnar and 
cross sections. 

— Atlas northern anthracite field, part 

4. Pennsylvania Geol. Survey, AA. 8 
sheets. Harrisburg, 1889. 

Colored geologic maps, with marginal col> 
umnar sections. 

— Atlas northern anthracite field, part 

5. Pennsylvania Geol. Sarvey, A^. 7 
sheets. Harrisbarg, 1889. 

Gross and columnar sections in coal-meas- 
ures. 



I, Robert T. A partial report on the 
geology of western Texas. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33, |^. 73-75. 
1887. 

Notice of G. G. Shumard's posthumous re- 
port. Describes the work of the Shnmards, 
and points out the erroneonsness of their 
opinion in regard to the stratigraphio relations 
of the subdivisions of the Cretaceous to each 
other, and to the Tertiary. 

— The topography and geology of the 
Cross-Timbers and surrounding regions 
in northern Texas. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33, pp. 291-303, 
plate 6. 1887. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, p. 172, \ 
p. 1887. 

Describes the general topographic and geol- 
ogic features of Texas, and the relations of 
the Cretaceous. Points out the cause of the 
cross-timbers, and discusses their extent and 
geologic relations. Gives a table showing 
the history, position, equivalency, strati- 
graphy, paleontology, and occurrence of the 
subdivisions of the Cretaceous of northern 
Texas. Accompanied by a hypsometric map. 

— The Texas section of the American 



Cretaceous. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 287-309. 
1887. 
Describes the subdivisions of the Texas 



88 



EECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOE 1S87 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



, Robert T.— Continued. 
Cretaceous, and dlsonsses their faanal and 
stratigraphio relations, extent, and equira- 
leDcy with the Cretaoeoas of other parts of 
North America and of Europe. Beviews the 
literature and paleontology and the equiva- 
lenoy and horizons of theliuhdlvlsions of the 
American Cretaceous. 

- The present condition of knowledge 



of the geology of Texas. 

IT. S. Gteol. Surrey, Bull., rol. 7, pp. 381-^73, 
No. 45. 1887. 

Historic sketch of geologic investigation, 
and summary and review of the results. 

Notes upon the Texas section of the 

American Cretaceous. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assnc. Adr. Science, Froc, toL 86, p. 
216, I p. 1888. 

Refers to relations and equivalency of a 
new group lying below the Dakota sandstone, 
and the general relations of the Cretaceous 
members in Texas. 

f ] Notes on the geology of Western 

Texas. 

G-eol. and Sci. Bull., voL 1, No. 6, | p., 40. 
1888. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 61-52, 
ip. 1889. 

Keferences to extent and inclination of Car* 
l>oniferon8, divisibility of "red beds" into 
Permian and Jura Trias, relations of Creta- 
ceous, Quaternary or late Tertiary of plains 
west of the Sweetwater, evidence of Quater- 
nary lakes in the mountain region west of the 
Pecos, the terraces of the Bio Grande near 
El Paso, the lower Cretaceous or possible 
Jurassic of the southwestern region, and the 
Quaternary and post-Quaternary history es- 
pecially of the Llano Estacado region. 

The Trinity formation of Arkansas, 

Indian Territory, and Texas. 

Sciencei vol. 11, p. 21, 1 p. 1888. 

Describes the characteristics, extent, and 
general relations of a pre-Cretaceous Mesozoic 
series to which the term Trinity formation is 
applied. 

University of Texas. School of Geol- 
ogy — circular No. 1. 1 page. 1888. 

Beferonces to Permian of western Texas; 
occurrence of Laramie along the Texas side 
of the lower Bio Grande ; origin of the Texas 
Cretaceous ; occurrence of Mesozoic igneous 
area in central Texas ; the Jurassic age of the 
Tncnmcarri section in northwest Texas, and 
the existence of an extensive marine Juras- 
sic formation in southwest Texas and adjacent 
parts of Mexico. 

— *- Neozoic geology of southwestern Ar- 
kansas. 

Arkansas Geol. Survey, Report for 1888, 
vol. 2, pp. 1-260. Map. 1888. 



HILL. Rohert T. -^Continued. 

Beview by Jules Mafcoii« Am. G-eologist, 
vol. 4, pp. 357-367. 1889. Abstracts. Popular 
Science Monthly, vol. 36, p. 129, | p. 1889. 
Am. G^eologist, voL 4, pp. 243-246. 1889. Am. 
Jour. Sol., 3d aeries, voL 98^ pp. 413-414, f p. 
1888. 

Systematio description of the several forma- 
tions, discussions of equivalency, geologic 
history, extent and relations in adjoining and 
correlated regions, and paleontologic descrip- 
tions. Part 2 is an account of economic 
flf^iogy, ii\ which the origin, dassifieation, 
geologic relations, and improvement of soils 
are considered. 

Events in North Amerioftn Creta- 



ceons history illastrated in the Arkan- 
sas-Texas diyision of the southwestern 
region of the United States. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 282-290. 
1889. 

Includes descriptions of stanitigraphic and 
structural characteristics, discussions of 
equivalency, taxonomy, and paleontologic re- 
lations of some of the Cretaceous members, 
and brief reference to pre-Cretacic and post* 
Cretacic conditions in the Arkansas-Texas 
region. 

Ueber eine dnrch die Hanfigkeit Hip- 



puritenartiger Chamiden ansgezeich- 
nete Fauna der oherturonen Kreide von 
Texas, von Ferdinand Roemer in Bres- 
lau. 1888. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 318-319, 
I p. 1889. 

Beview in which the stratigraphy is dis- 
cussed. 

— [ Remarks on occurrence of Macraster 
Texanus], 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, p. 168, i p. (Febru- 
ary No.) 1889. 

Beference to its associates and stratigraphio 
position. Beview of Boemer, Neues Jahrbnch, 
1888. vol. 1, pp. 191-196, pi. 

— [On the validity of some new species 
from the Cretaceous of Texas]. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, p. 169, ^ p. (Febru- 
ary No.) 1889. 

Beview of Sh titer *' Ueber die regularen 
Echinodermata der Kreide Nord Amerilcas,*' 
and Ueber Inoceramus und Cephalopoden der 
texanischen Kreide. Includes references to 
equivalency of Austin Cretaceomibeds. 

— A portion of the geologic story of the 
Colorado River of Texas. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 287-299. 1889. 
Abstracts, Popular Science Monthly, vol. 
36, p. 573, 2 col. 1890. Am. Naturalist, vol. 
24. p. 956, i p. 1890. 
Descriptions of stratigraphy, structure, and 



t>wb:^^"«i.\ 



IKaCOBX) O^* GEOLOGY FOK 1887 TO 1889. 



89 



orerlniw, and sketch of geologic history from 
Cambrian to Qaatemary in Travis, Bomet, 
and parts of adjoining counties. 

— The foraminiferal origin of certain 
Cretaceous limestones, and the sequence 
of sediments in North American Creta- 
ceoas. 

AnL Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 174-177. 1889. 

Discusses the nature of the lower Greta- 
oeons limestones, and summarizes the history 
of deposition of the Cretaceous of the Texas 
region. 

Paleontology of the Cretaceous for- 



mation of Texas. Part I. University 
of Texas school of geology, pp. 5, pis. 
3, Austin. 1889. 

Abstract, Popular Sdelice Monthly, toL 36, 
pp.424-42S,|eoL 1800. 

Includes a reference to the relations of the 
Tola limestone of the Comanche series near 
Austin. 

— The Per Allan rocks of Texas. 

Science, toL 13, p. 02, | ool. 1880. 

Calls attenUon to the presence of a Permian- 
Triassic ? series, and suggests their extension 
to the Kanab Valley section in Utah. 

— and PENROSE, R. A. F., jr. Rela- 



tion of the uppermost Cretaceous heds 
of the eastern and southern United 
States, and the Tertiary-Cretaceous 
parting of Arkansas and Texas. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, toI. 38, pp. 468-473. 
1880. Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, p. 
760, i p. 1800. 

Description of the characteristics and rela- 
tions of the uppermost Cretaceous members 
in the Texas- Arkansas region, presentation of 
evidence of their equivalency with the lower 
marls of the New Jersey region, and an ac- 
count of the relations and history of the un- 
conformity at the base of the Tertiary. Pre- 
faced by a summary account snd table of the 
Cretaceous members in the Arkansas-Texas 
region, and concluded by some suggestions in 
regard to Cretaceous taxonomy. 

HILLEBRAND, W. F. Chemistry. 

Geology and Mining Industry of Leadrille, 
Colorado, by S. F. Emmons, U. S. GeoL Sur- 
rey, &f on., vol. 12, pp. 585-608. 1886. 

Analyses of eruptives, limest<mes, ores, vein 
materials, etc. 

HILLSy R. C. Notes on the recent dis- 
covery of natural gas in Pitkin County, 
Colorado. 

Colorado Sci Soc.,Froc., vol. 2, part 2, pp. 
106-107. 1887. 

Discussion of the horizon from which the 
gas is derived. 



y B. C»^-Coutiuued, 

— Circulation of water tbrougb tbe 
strata of the upper Cretaceous coal 
measures of Gunnison County, Colo- 
rado. 

Colorado Sci. Soc., Froc, voL 2, part 2, pp. 
127-133. 1887. 

Account of the strata penetrated by bore- 
holes and general sketch of the geology of 
the region, illastrated by a geologic map. 

— Preliminary notes on the eruptions 
of the Spanish Peaks region. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Proc, vol. 3, pp. 24-34, 
pi. 1880. 

Describes structural relations of the dikes 
and laccolltes, and discusses the history of 
their intrusion. 

— The recently discovered Tertiary 
heds of the Huerfano River hasiu, Col- 
orado. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Froo., voL 3, pp. 148-164, 
pi. 1880. 

Description of their stratigraphy, structure, 
distribution, volcuiic contents, and relations 
to the Laramie, and discussion of their history, 
extent, and taxonomy. 

— Address — The field for original work 



in the Rocky Mountains. 

Colorado SoL Soc, Froc, vol. 3, pp. 168- 
184. 1880. 

General review of the present condition of 
knowledge of Colorado geology and summary 
of discoveries made since the Hayden survey. 
Befers to occurrence of supposed Cambrian 
near Ouray, the extent and stratigraphy of 
the Laramie, and of the Trias in the San Juan 
region; evidences of glaciation in the White 
River plateau, the occurrence of supposed 
Tertiary conglomerate near Ouray and Telln- 
ride, the genesis of ores, and the existence of 
more recent volcanic formations in various 
parts of the State. 

HINMAN, Russell. The laws of corra- 
sion. 

Science, voL 12, pp. 110-120, \ p. 1888. 

Beference to Powell's contributions to the 
subject, and suggests some exceptional con- 
ditions. 

HITCHCOCK, C. H. Genesis of the 
Hawaiian Islands. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc, vol. 36, pp. 
222-223. 188& 

Discusses evidence of uplift, in review of 
Dutton. 

[On the nomenclature of the Ameri- 
can lower Paleozoic.]' 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, pp. 11-12. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 201-202. 1888. 



90 



RECORD OP GKOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 71. 



HITCHCOCB; C. H.— Contioaed. 

Beferenoe to the position of the "Taoonio*' 
rocks, the use of the term *' Taoonio," the 
use of the smaller American terms like 
" Niagara," and to a dual nomenclature, pale- 
ontologic and stratigraphio. 

Report of the subcommittee on the 

Qaaternary and Recent. 

Intematioiial Congress of Geologists, Am 
Oommittee Eeports, 1888, H, pp, 12. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 300-806. 1888. 

Review of ocofirrence, characteristics, and 
relations of the members of the Qnatemarj 
and r68am6 of opinion in regard to their 
equivalency and correlation, and the sequence 
of events in Quaternary time. 

CoDglomerates in New England 



gneisses [a letter addressed to Alexan- 
der WinchelK] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp, 253-256. 1880. 

Discussed the age and relations of pebble 
and fragment-bearing crystalline rocks in 
Bhode Island, Kew Hampshire, Vermont, and 
Massachusetts. 

— Date of the publication of the report 



upon the geology of Vermont. 

Boston Soc. Nat Hist. , Froc. , voL 24, pp. 33- 
37. 1889. 

Includes a historic account and definition 
of the application of the term ' ' Georgia slate, " 
and. references to the results of Walcott's 
studies in western Yermont. 

— On the Archean. See FRAZER, 



Report on Archean. 

[QBBS, William H. On the petro- 
graphical characters of a dike of dia- 
base in the Boston basin. 

Harv., Mns. Oomp. Zool., Bull., vol. 16, pp. 
1-12, pi. No. 1. 1888. 

Also describes occurrence, textural rela- 
tions in its different parts, and some features 
of the inclosing strata. Analyses. 

— On the rocks occurring in the neigh- 



borhood of Ilchester, Howard County, 
Maryland: Being a detailed study of 
the area comprised in sheet No. 16 of 
the Johns Hopkins University map. 

Johns Hopkins Univ., Oircnlars, vol. 7, pp. 
60-70, 4°, No. 65. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, p. 527. 
1888. 

Mainly petrographic. Keferences to se- 
quence of the various eruptives and the rela- 
tions at several localities. 

— On the paragenesis of allanite and 
epidote as rock-forming minerals. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 38, pp. 223- 
228. 1889. 



HOBBS, William H.— Continued. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 721, \ p. 
1889. 

Includes a petregraphie description uid 
analysis of the granite finom Rohester, near 
Baltimore. 

HODGE, J..M. Preliminary report on 
the geology of parts of Letcher, Har- 
lan, Leslie, Perry, and Breathitt coun- 
ties. 

Kentucky, GkoL Surrey, John R. Frootor, 
Director, Reports on the sontheastem Ken- 
tucky coal-field, pp. 85-52, maps, plates. 1887. 

Description of coal beds, and the structure 
and stratigraphy of the coal measures. 

Preliminary report on the geology of 

the lower north fork, middle and south 
forks, Kentucky River. 

Kentucky GeoL Survey, John R. Proctor, 
Director, Reports on the Sontheastem Ken- 
tucky coal-field, pp. 53-114, pis. 1887. 

Description of the coal beds, and the strati- 
graphy and structure of the coal measures 
and conglomerate. Accompanied by plates of 
columnar sections. 

HODGBS, A. D. Notes on the topogra- 
phy and geology of the Cerro de Pasco, 
Peru. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 729-753. 1888. 

Includes a description of Cretaceous and 
Jurassic formations, and the occurrence and 
petrography of the andesites, and a sketch 
of the geologic history of the region. 

HOLLICB; Arthur. [WeU at Clifton, 

Staten Island.] 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc., Froc, Oct. 
8,1887. 
Nine hundred feet in depth in mica schists. 

[Leaf impressions in Cretaceous (f) 

sandstone in drift near Arrochar sta- 
tion.] 

Staten Island Nat Sci. Assoc, Froc, Dec. 
8,1888. icol. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 459, 1 p, p. 648, i 
p. 1889. 

Notice of occurrence of drift masses con- 
taining fossil leaves, and a fine exposure of 
modified drift overlain by bowlder drift. 

[Remarks on fossiliferops sandstones 

in Cretaceous clays on Staten Islands] 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc, Froc, 
April, 1889, i p. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 1038. 1889. 

Brief reference to their occurrence on beach 
at Tottenville and Perth Amboy, and in a 
new clay outcrop at Prince's Bay. 

[Triassic shale outcrops on Staten 

Island.] 



DARTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



91 



HOLLICK, Arthur— Continned. 

Staten Island Nat. Sci. Assoc., Froc, 
April, 1889, | p. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, pp. 1033-1844, 1037. 
1889. 

Brief references to outcrops at Mariner's 
Harbor, and near Erastina and Arlington 
stations. 

HOLLISTER, O. J. Gold and Bilver 
mining in Utah. 

Am. Inst Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 3-18. 1887. 

Incidentally refers to some geologic feat- 
ures of a portion of the Wasatch range and 
vicinity. 

HONBYMAN, D. Geology of JLyles- 
ford, King's Coanty, Nova Scotia. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Froc., voL7, pp. 7-12. 
1888. 

References to the bowlders, glacial striae 
and drifts, terraces, Silarian, Cambrian, and 
Ti lassie outcrops, and occnrrences of granites, 
amygdaloids, and diorites. 

Notes of examination by Prof. James 

Hall of the Silurian collection of the 
Provincial Mnsenm. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Froc, vol. 7, pp. 14-17. 
1888. 

Statement of paleontologio evidence of tbe 
equivalency of the sabdivisions of the Arisaig 
gronp, the beds at Wentworth, and the Sila- 
rian beds on Cape Breton. 

Geology of Halifax and Colchester 

connties. Part II. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Froc, voL 7, pp. 36-47. 
1888. 

References to lower Cambrian, lower Carbon- 
iferous, granites, evidences of glaciation, con- 
tacts of lower Carboniferous and lower Cam- 
brian, and the date of metamorphism of the 
gold-bearing rocks. 

Glacial geology of Nova Scotia. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Froc, vol. 7, pp. 73-86. 
1888. 

Description of bowlder deposits at various 
localities, and discussion of their origin . Ref> 
erence to strisB, terraces, and glacial history 
of the region. 

^Nova Scotian superficial geology, 

with map, systematized and illustrated. 

Nova Sootian Inst., Froc, vol. 7, pp. 131- 
141. 1888. 

Reference to the occurrence, relations, and 
history of the several superficial formations. 

" — A geological recreation in Massachu- 
setts centre, U. S. A. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Trans., vol. 7, pp. 197- 
aOL 1880. 
Indndes incidental references to the char- 



HONETMAN. D.— Continned. - 

acteristics of the crystalline rooks of the 
region, and discusses their age. 

Glacial bowlders of our fisheries, and 

invertehrates, attached and detached. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Trans., voL7, pp.205- 
213. 1889. 

Account of bowlders firom the fishing banks, 
and expression of opinion in regard to for- 
mation underlying the region. 

HOVE'5?", Edmund Otis. Observations, 
on some of the trap ridges of the East 
Haveu-Branford region. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 38, pp. 361-383, 
pi. IX. 1889. 

Descriptions and discussions of contact 
phenomena, amygdular surfoces, breccias, 
faults, and flexures, and discussion of their 
bearing on the origin of the traps. 

HOWliEY, James P. The Taconic of 
eastern Newfoundland. 

Am. aeologist, voL 4, pp. 121-125. 1889. 

Statements in regard to the relations of 
Cambrian and Ordovician members at various 
localities. 



>, O. P. [Great bowlder in 
Woodbridge, Connecticnt.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 4, p. 26, 1 
p. 1887. 

Statement of size and elevation, and sug- 
gestion in regard to its origin and history. 

HUGHES, N. C. Genesis and geology : 
the harmony of 'the scriptural and ge- 
ological records, pp. 142. 12°. Choco- 
winity. North Carolina, 1887, 
Not seen. 

HUMPHRETS, A. N. Mining methods 
practiced by the Westmoreland Coal 
Company, Irwin, Pennsylvania. 

Pennsylvania. Geol. Survey., Eeport for ^ 

1886, part 1, pp. 411-456, 7 plates. 1887. 
Pages 446-454; section of the bed, dips, 

day and slack veins, faults. 

HUNT, T. Sterry. Elements of primary 
geology. 

Geol. Mag., 3d decade, vol. 4, pp. 493-500. 
1887. 

Abstracts, Eng. and Mining Jour., vol.44, 
p. 219. 40. 1887. Nature, vol, 36, pp. 574-575. 

1887. British Assoc. Adv. Science, Report, 
1887, pp. 704-705. 1888. 

Contains a r6snm6 of the characteristics, 
equivalency, and distribution of tbe subdivi- 
sions of the Archean, and a brief discussion 
of the extent of the Taconian in Eastern 
North America, the equivalency of the Ani. 
mikie, and the relations of the Keen senawan 
and Cambrian. 



92 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BtTLL. 76k 



HUNT, T. Sterry— Continued. 

Oastaldi on Italian geology and the 

crystalline rocks. 

G«ol. Magazine., 3d decade, roL 4, pp. 531- 
540. 1887. 

Abstract, Brltiah Amoc. Adr. Science, Re- 
port, 1887, pp. 703-704. 1888. 

Refers to the analtered nature of the Mon- 
treal granitoid chrysolilio dolerite, and to the 
magnesian chrysolites in the crystalline lime- 
stones of eastern Massacbasetts. Briefly 
discosses the petrography of the Taconian 
and its separateness ftrom the Huronian and 
upper Taconic. 

The genetic history of crystalline 

rocks. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., voL 4, section 
in, pp. 7-37. 1887. 

An examination of the orenitio " hyiMthesis 
in some of its aspects to show how far the 
conception of a sin^^le consolidated ijmeoiis 
mass under the combined action of heat and 
water may be made to explain satisfactorily 
the varioas facts in the history of the Earth's 
crystalline crast." Discasses the relations of 
stratified and mansiye crystalline rocks; folia- 
tion ; variations and sonrctfb of igneous rocks; 
texture, composition, and minerals of vein 
atones, and the nature of the crystalline lime- 
stones of eastern Massachusetts and New 
York, and the apatite-bearing veins of Can- 
ada. 



— The Taconic question restated. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 114-126, 238-250, 
312-320. 1887. 

Reviewed by J. D. Dana, Am. Jour. Sci., 3d 
ser., vol. 33, pp. 412-419. 1887. 

Reviews the stages o^ opinion which have 
been held in regard to the " Taconic" and re- 
lated formations. Calls attention to Emmons's 
modified views in regard to the age of the 
" upper Taconic." Discusses the history, 
use, and application of the term " Ta<;onic," 
the relations of the pre- Potsdam strata in 
America, and the significance of the discov- 
eries of Dana, Dwight, Ford, Walcott, and 
others, in the Taconlc-Hudson River region, 
and Rominger and others in the Lake Superior 
region. Defines the term " Taconian " as ap- 
plied by him, and considers the use of the 
word " Cambrian." 

— [On subdivisions, unconformities, 



characteristics, origin of some members, 
nomenclature and life of the Archean, 
origin of serpentine, classification of 
erupt ivcs, nomenclature of the lower 
Palezoic formations.] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Oonunittee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 68-69, | p. 

— On crystalline shists. 

Nature, vol. 38, pp. 519-522. 1888. 



HUNT, T. Sterry—Continued. 

From Lea achistea oTystallina, published by 
the International Geological Congress in Lon- 
don. 1888. 

Includes a diaoussion of the stibdivision of 
the pre-Cambrian rooks of North America, 
and the age, extent, characteristics, and rela- 
tions of the members of the " Taconian " uid 
Taconic 

H7ATT, Alphens. 

The Taconic at Boston. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, p. 187, i p. 1888. 
On the nomenclature proposed by Winch ell 
for the Cambrian rocks. 



Evolution of the faunas of the lower 

Liam 

Boston Soc. Nat Hist, Froc, vol. 24, pp. 17- 
81. 1888. 

Includes references to the extent and rela- 
tions of the basins in which the lower Lias of 
Europe was deposited, and the equivalency of 
some of ita mem tiers. 

Idaho, [Caribou Mountain,] Yax Diest. 
CcBur d'Alene mines, Clayton. 
deep well at Nam pa, Wright. 
geology of, Thompson. 
graphitic anthracite, Jbxnkt. 
glacial geology, Chambbrlin. 
volcanic dusts, analysis, Whitfikld, 
J. E. 

IDDINGS, Joseph P. The nature and 
origin of lithopbyssB, and the lamina- 
tion of acid lavas. 

Am. Jour. Sol , 3d series, vol. 33, pp. 36-45. 
1887. 

Abstract of a memoir to appear in the Sev- 
enth Report of the U. S. Geol. Survey. De- 
scribes the mioro-strctnre and lithology of the 
spherulites and lithophysie, and the finely 
laminated structure of the rhyolite of Ohsid- 
ian Cliff, Yellowstone Park ; and discusses the 
origin of these structural phenomena. 

On the origin of primary quartz in 



basalt. 

Axa. Jour. Sci. , vol. 36, pp. 208-221. 1888. 

Abstracts, Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, p. 1021, 
I p. 1888. Am. aeologist, voL 3, p. 52, ^ p. 
1889. 

Petrographic description of quarts-bearing 
basalts from the Tewan Mountains, Arizona ; 
references to other similar occurrences in Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, and Nevada, and discussion 
of the origin of the quartz, and the conditions 
involved in the solidification of eruptive 



I 



— Obsidian Cliflf, Yellowstone National 
Park. 

IT. S.Geol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 249-295, pis. 9-18. 1888. 



DABTOK.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



93 



IDDINGS, Joseph P.— Continaed. 

Absti acts. Am. Geologist, voL 4, pp. lOa-lOi. 

1889. Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, pp. 70-71, h P- 

1890. Am. Jonr. Sol., 3d series, vol. 33, pp. 36- 
45. 1887. 

Desoriptioii of occarrenoe, litbologio stract- 
nre, and petrographio oharaoteristics ; discas- 
sionof theorigiD, relation, and history of devel- 
opment of the various structures in theobsid' 
ian, and references to literature of litbopbysse, 
and to occurrences of obsidian at other local- 
ties. 
— On the cryBtallization of igneous 

rocks. 

Washington, Phil. Soc, Bull., vol. 11, pp. 
65-113. 1889. 

Abstracts, Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 718, } p. 
1889, voL 24, pp. 360-361,^ p. 1800. 

Systematic discussion of the philosophy of 
the crystaUiaation of igneous rocks. 

• — Leacite rock, Wyoming. See 
HAGUE, Arnold. 

iHLSEira, M. C. Review of the mining 
interesta of the San Jnan region. 

Colorado School of Mines, Report of field- 
'Work and analyses, 1886, pp. 19-63. Map. 
1888. 

Includes description of the geology of the 
i-egion, and discnssion 6t geologic history, 
and of the age and origin of the mineral de- 
X>oaits. 

Report on oil fields of Fremont 

J^nnty. 

Colorado School of Mines, Report of field 
"^rotk and analyses, 1886, pp. 67-f^O, pi. 1888. 

Includes a description of the geology of the 
^■region, with a sketch of its geologic history. 

Notes on Leadville. 

Colorado School of Mines, Annnal Report, 
8^» pp. 29-45. 

Includes a brief general discnssion of the 
geology of the region. 

Carboniferous echinodermata, 

"BYES, 
coal, ASHBURNBR. 

"Dauntless" core drill, ExG. and 

Mining Jour. 
driftless area, Chamberlin, T. C. 

Chamberlin and Salisbury. 
forest bed beneath intra-morainal 

drift, Lbyerett. 
fossil faelsy Comstock. 
fiilgerite from Whiteside County, 

analysis, Clarke, F.W. 
glacial phenomena in northeastern 

Illinois, Lbybrbtt. 
loess and clays, analyses, Riggs. 
lower Silurian sceptopora, Ulrich. 
morai|iefl^ ChamberliN; T. C. 



Illinois— Con ti nued. 

Paleozoic border adjoining Jackson 
purchase, Kentucky, Lougiiridgb. 

Peoria County, Chapman. 

raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Levbrbtt. 

types of Devonian system in North 
America, Williams, H. S. 
iLndiana, Benton, Tippecanoe, and Wash- 
ington counties, Gorby. 

Brown County, Gorby and Leb. 

building stones, chalk beds, clays, 
glacial deposits, gas, Thompson, M. 

oaves and cave life, Kingsley. 

chipped implement in drift of Jack- 
son County, Cresson. 

Clinton fossils, Fobrstb. 

Clinton, Marshall, and Starke conn- 
ties, Thompson, M. 

coals, ASHBURNEB. 

compendium of geology, ThompsoNj 

M. 
correlations of lower Silurian, 

Ulrich. 
orinoids from the Niagara at St. Paul, 

Beechler. 
diameter of Silurian island about 

Cincinnati, Dennis. 
erosion, Scovill. 

glacial phenomena in northern Indi- 
ana, Levbrbtt. 
Hancock County, Brown. 
Henry and adjoining counties, Phin- 

ney. 
Keokuk group at CrawfordsvlUe, 

Bkbculbr. 
limestone from Bedford, analysis, 

Clarke, F. W. 
Maxinkuckee, Thompson and Lee. 
natural gas, Phinney. 
origin of loess, Campbell. 
terminal moraine in central Indiana, 

Thompson, M. 
Trenton limestone, Orton. 
types of Devonian system in North 

America, Williams, H. S. 
Wabash arch, Gorby. Thompson, M. 

Indiana, Department of Geology and 
Natural History, Fifteenth Report, 
1886. 

Benton County, Gorby. 

Boone County, Gorby and Leb. 

Building stones, Thompson, M« 

Chalk beds, Thompson, M. 

Clays, Thompson, M. 



fe 



94 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.7& 



Indiana, Department of Geology and 
Natural History, Fifteenth Report, 
1886— Continued. 

Clinton Connty, Thompson, W. H. 

Compend of geology, etc., Thomp- 
son, M. 

Glacial deposits, Thompson, M. 

Hancock Coanty, Brown. 

Henry and partslof adjacent coanties^ 
Phinnky. 

Marshall Coanty, Thompson, W. H. 

Maxinkackee, Thompson, W. H. and 
Lbb. 

Natural gas, Thompson, M. 

Preface, Thompson, M. 

Starke County, Thompson, W. H. 

Terminal moraine, Thompson, M. 

Tippecanoe County, Gorby. 

Wabash arch, Gorby. 

Washington County, Gorby, 
Indian Territory, coal, Ashburner. 

Trinity formation. Hill, R. T. 

INGALL, E. D. [Preliminary report on 
mining districts in the Thunder Bay 
region.] 

Canada, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Sonrey, Re- 
port, 1886, part A, pp. 14-19. 1887. 

Includes a brief description of the charac- 
tertstics and relations of the Animikie rocks. 

International Congress of Geologists, 
American Committee Reports, 
1888. 
Report on Archean, Frazer. Bell. 
Blake. Dana. Dawson, G. M. 
Dawson, J. W. Dutton. Emer- 
son. Emmons, S. F. Gilbert. 
Hague. Heilprin. Hitchcock. 
Hunt. Irving. Lb Conte. Mac- 
Farlane. Powell. Pumpelly. 

S E L W Y N. WaDSWORTH. WIL- 
LIAMS, G. H. W I N C H E L L, A. 
WiNCHELL, N. H. 

Report on lower Paleozoic, Win- 
CHELL, N. H. Blake. Dana. 
Williams, G. H. Dawson, J. W. 
Dutton. Emerson. Emmons, 
S. F. Ford. Hague. Hall. 
Hitchcock. Le Conte. Mac- 
Farlane. Newberry. Selwyn. 
Walcott. Winchell, a. 

Report on upper Paleozoic (Demonic), 
Williams, H. S. 

Report on upper Paleozoic (Carbonic;, 
Stevenson. 

Report on Mesozoic, Cook. 



International Congress of Geologists, 
American Committee Reports, 
1888— Continued. 
Mesozoic jrealm, Copb» 
Report on Cenozoic (marine), Smith, 
E.A. Aldrich. Dall. Heilprin. 
Hilgard. Le Conte. Newberry. 
Whitfield, R. P. Winchell, A. 
Report on Cenozoic (interior). Cope. 
Report on Quaternary and recent, 
Hitchcock. 

dlNVILLIERS, E. V. The Pittsburgh 
coal region. 

FennsylTania, QrwL Sarrej, Report for 
1886, part 1, pp. 1-372, 3 pis., map in pocket. 
1887. 

Inolades deaoriptions of th»«traottiral and 
stratigraphic relations and a detailed accoant 
of the geologic featores of the soathwestem 
comities of Pennsylvania. Accompanied by 
a folded, colored geologic map. 

Geological map of southwest Penn- 
sylvania, giving the geological out- 
crops and tidal elevations as a basis for 
estimating the depths to the oil and gas 
sands, to illmtrate Mr. CarlPs report 

on the oil and gas regions 

scale, 2 miles to 1 inch. June, 1887. 
Fennsylyania, G-eol.Snrrey, Annual Report 
for 1886, part 2, two sheets in pocket. 1887. 

The same as the sheet in part 1, with addi- 
tion of columnar sections and notes by Caiil. 

Report on the iron mines and lime- 



stone quarries of the Cumberlaud- 
Lebanon valley. 1886. 

FennsylTania, G-eoL Surrey, Report for 
1886, part 4, pp. 1409-1507, maps, sheets 7-11 m 
atlas. 1887. 

Description of stracture and stratigraphy 
of the valley region, the mines, and the quar- 
ries of limestone and of Mesozoic sandstone. 
Brief discussion of the Structure in the Dills- 
burg and Hammelstown regions, and relations 
of the Kewark sandstone. 

— and McCKEATH, Andrew. The 
New River-Cripple Creek mineral 
region of Virginia, pp. 171, 4 plates, and 
map in pocket. Harrisburg. 1887. 

Includes a description of the stratigraphy, 
distribution, and structure of the several 
formations in southern Wythe and Pulaski 
counties, in general and in connection with 
the ore deposits. Describes the Draper 
Mountain region in considerable detail, and 
discusses and figures its complicated struc- 
tural relations. The report is accompanied 
by a colored geologic map on which topog- 
' raphy and structure are indicated. 



DABTON.) 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



95 



d'INVILLIERS and MoCRBATH— 

Continned. 
Comparison of southern cokes and 

iron ores. See MoCreath, A.S. and. 



Mineral resources of the upper Cum- 



berland valley. See MoCreath, A. S. 
and. 

Iowa, Carboniferoufi ecbinodermata, 
Ketbs. 
chert of upper coal measures in 
Montgomery County, Am. Geolo- 
gist. 

coal, ASHBURNBR. 

continuance of Lake Cheyenne, 
Todd. 

coal measnresof central Iowa, Kbtks. 

Cretaceous deposits, White, C. A. 

Devonian faunsB, Williams, H. S. 

defense of local geology, Davenport, 
Barris. 

drift and loess of north-central basin, 
Webster. 

driftless area, Chamberlin and 
Salisburt. 

fossils from coal measures at Des 
Moines, Keyes. 

fossils from Rockville shales, Web- 
ster* 

general description of Devonian, 
Webster. 

geology of southeastern Iowa, Gor- 
don. 

geology of Johnson County, Web- 
ster. 

glacial flows, Webster. 

hematite in Allamakee County, Orr. 

later Cretaceous, Am. Geologist. 

loess, Chamberlain, T. C. Cham- 
berlin and Salisbury. McGeb. 

loess and clays, analyses, RiGGS. 

lower Carbonic gasteropa from Bur- 
lington, Ketbs. 

Mesozoio, Marcou. 

Mis^uri River, Broadhead. 

Muscatine County, Calvin. 

pockets containing clay at Clinton, 
Farnsworth. 

Rockford shales, Webster. 

superficial deposits of northeastern 
Iowa, McGeb. 

surface geology of Burlington, 
Ketbs. 

terraces ol Missouri^ Todd* 



Iowa — Continued. 

topographic types in northeastern 

Iowa, McGbb. 
well at Davenport, Tiffany, 
well at Keokukj Gordon. 
well at Washington, Calvin. 

Iowa State Unlveraity, Bulletin, voL 1. 
Geological problem in Muscatine 
County, Calvin. 

IRELAN, William, Jr. Report of State 
Mineralogist. 

Oalifomia, Sixth Annual Report of the 
Mineralogitt, part 2, pp. 14-62. 1887. 

ReferoDcea to the geologic features in the 
vicinitj of the mines in Amador, Batte, Cal- 
averas, £1 Dorado, Fresno, Nevada, Sierra, 
and Taolamne Counties. 

Mineral resources of the State. Con- 
sidered by counties. 

Oalifomia, Eighth Report of State Miner, 
alogist, pp. 22-223, 324-335, 342-352, 402-504, 
612-516, 528-643, 652-678, 600-«9I. 188a 

Contains incidental references to occurrence, 
relations, and structure of metamorphic, 
granitic, eruptive, coal-bearing and other 
rocks and clays, and drifts in various localities. 

[ ] Natural and artificial cement. 

Oalifomia, Eighth Report of State Miner 
alogist, pp. 865-884. 1888. 

Includes analyses of shell lime from south- 
western California, and limestones from Santa 
Cms and adjoining counties. 

IRVING, Roland D. Report 

Lake Superior division. 

XT. S. Geol. Survey, 6th Report, J. W. Pow- 
ell, 1884-'85, pp. 40-48. 1885. 

Includes an account of observations on the 
Vermilion Lake, Animikie, and associated 
series. 

Origin of the ferruginous schists and 

iron ores of the Lake Superior region. 

A»" Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 32, pp. 255-272. 
1886. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, voL 83, 
p. 714, 1 col. 3888. 

Described in bibliography for 1886. 

Is there a Huronian group f [Read 

to National Academy of Sciences, April, 

1887.1 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 34, pp. 204- 
216,249-263,365-374. 1887. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 119-120. 
1888. 

Summarizes fche evidence indicative of the 
distinctness of the Huronian as a group oom. 
parable with Cambrian, Silurian, etc. ; the di> 
visibility of the rocks of the Marquette, 
Menominee, and Penokee belts into two mem* 



96 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL.7S. 



IRVING, Roland D. — Contiuued. 

bers, the opper of which, and also the Ant- 
mikie, beinj; of Haronian age. Gives an 
accoant of recent field work in the Haronian 
rej^ion aud in the district north of Lake Su- 
perior, describing the ancrystalline nature of 
the original Huronian rocks, and outcrops 
exhibiting the relations of their basal con- 
glomerates to the underlying scliists and 
granites. Discusses the relations of the 
Haronian, iron-bearing, Animikie, and Kee- 
weenaw rocks and their structure, origin, and 
stratigraphy ; the extent of the Huronian in 
America ; the uncertainty of age of some so- 
called Huronian areas in Canada, and the use 
of the term "group." Proposes the use of 
Chamberlin's term " Agnotozoic *' for the 
great system of formations between the PaleO' 
zoic (Cambrian) and Archean. 

L ] [On the use of the term "Ta- 

conic."] 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oonunittee, Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 1 line. 
Am Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Expression of opinion. 

[On subdivisions, nomenclature, ori- 
gin of some members^and characteristics 
of Archean rocks, classification of erup- 
tives, origin of serpeutinea, and use of 
term "Taconic."] 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee, Reports, 1888, A, pp. 61-65. 

Report — Lake Superior division of 

geology. 

IT. S.Geo 1. Survey, Seventh Report, J.W 
Powell, 1885-86, pp. 68-76. 188a 

In r68um6 of reHalts refers to the origin of 
the ferruginous schistsand their iron ores, the 
divisibility of the Archean, the origin of 
chloritic schists exposed at the faUs of the 
Menominee River, and the origin of the upper 
mica schists of the iron-bearing series. 

On the classification of the early 

Cambrian and pre-Cambrian forma- 
tions. A brief discussion of principles, 
illustrated by examples drawn mainly 
from the Lake Superior region. 

U. S. Geol, Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
PoweU, 1885- '86, pp. 365-454, pis. 30-51. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 111-112, 
I p. 1889. 

Paleoutologic and lithologic characteristics, 
and unconformities and overlaps of various 
kinds. Discussion of geologic relations and 
equivalency of rock §roup in the Lake Super- 
ior region, and taxonomy of the lower part of 
the geologic coluum. Accompanied by colored 
geologic maps. 

IVES, James T. B. Geology in the pub- 
lic schools. 



IVES, James T. B. — Continaed. 

Oanadian Inst., Fxoo.,3d series, voL 5, pp. 
125-138. 1887. 

Describes a device for illastrating the sim- 
pler geologic relations. 

Iron and other ores in Ontario. 

Canadian Inst, Froc, 8d series, vol. 6^ pp. 
18^-192. 1888. 

Includes a brief discussion of the horizon of 
some of the ores. 

[Remarks on ancient shore-line near 

Toronto.] 

Canadian Inst., Proe., 3d series, vol. 6, pp. 
4-5,1888. 

Remarks on the observationa of previous 
writers, and statement in regard to evidence 
of terraces near Toronto. 

JACKSON, A. Wendell. [Report on 
some California bnilding stones.] 

California, Sevmifli Report of the State 
lilineralogist, pp. 206-213. 1888. 

Macroscopic and microscopic descriptions of 
Santa Susanna sandstone, Henley sandstone, 
Campo Seco tufa, and Colton marble. 

Bnilding stones. 

California, Eighth Report of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 885-894. 1888. 

Describes petrography of Angel Island 
sandstone, Sespe brownstone, San Jos6 sand- 
stone, Altamont sandstone, Penryn granite, 
Bockl in granite, and Mount Raymond granite. 

JAMES, Joseph F. Account of a well 
drilled for oil or gas at Oxford, Ohio, 
May and Jane, 1887. 

Cincinnati, Soc. Nat Hist., Jonr., voLlO, 
pp. 70-77. 1887. 

Abstract geological section of southwestern 
Ohio. Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, voL 
3«,p. 211, 1 p. 1888. 

Abstract by author, Science, vol. 0, p. 623. 
1887. 

Description of 1,365 feet of strata passed 
through, from the Cincinnati group to white 
arenaceous limestones thoogfat to be equiva- 
lent to the GalcifMwns sandnM^ 

The geology of Cincinnati 

Cincinnati, Soc. Nat. Hist., Jonr., vol. 9, pp. 
20-21, 136-141. 1886. ^ 

Abstract, "The glacial lake and island of 
Cincinnati," Popular Science Monthly, vol. 
31, pp. 423-424. 

Abstract of pi^er described in bibliography 
for 1886. 

An ancient channel of the Ohio 

River at Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati, Soc. Nat. Hist., Jonr., vol.11, 
pp. 96-101. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Assoc. Adv. Science| Prpc. 
voL37,p. 196. 1889. 



OABTON.J 



BECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



97 



JAMES, Joseph F. — Continaed. 

Besoription of drift-filled ralleys, mArking 
part of the oonrse of the preglacial Ohio 
drainage. 

The lYOxy dale well in Mill Creek 

YftUey. 

Oinoinnati, See. Nat Hist, Xonr., roL 11, 
pp. 102-104. 1888. 

Description and oolomnar section. Brief 
^ discasaion of hearing of some of the beds on 
glaoiBl history. 

Section of Maqnoketa shales in 

Iowa. 

ilm. Naturalist, roL 23, p. 810, 1 p. 1889. 

Ahstraot of paper read to American Asso- 
oiatiott, 1888. The abstract consists of some 
brief allnaioiis to some of the rela tio ns of the 

The geology of the Montmoienci. 

A correction in a date. 

Am. Oeologlst, yoL 4, p. 887, | p. 1889. 

Supplies correct date of Emmons* paper of 
that title, and calls attention to another paper 
hy Emmons in the American Magazine on the 
Hudson Biver rocks. 

— ^ Bemarks npon sedimentation in the 
Cincinnati gronp. 

Oinoinnati, Soo. Nat. Hist, Xonr., toL 12, 
pp. 84-36. 1889. 

Calls attention to evidence of the presence 
of beadles at several horlaons in the Cincin- 
nati gronp* 

JABflXtSON, E. Geology of the Leaven- 
worth prospect well. 

Kansas Acad. 8oi., Trans., toL 11, pp.87- 
88. 1889. 
Inclades record of 2,118-foot weU. 

JENNET, Walter P. Graphitic anthra- 
cite in the Parker mine, Wood Biver, 
Idaho. 

Sdiool of Ifinss Qnarterlj, vol. 10, pp. 818- 
815. 1889. 

Po e erlp tlon of geologic relations, and dis- 
eossion of genesiSi 

Notes on: the dry lakes of soathem. 

lfevada.and California, with relation 
to the loess. 

School of Mines Qnarterly, vol. 10, pp. 316- 
818. 1889. 

Description of the lakes ; their deposits and 
history. 

JERMT, Gnstay. Reports [sonth cen- 
tral Texas]. 

Tezai^ GeoL and Mineralogical Snnrey, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 61-81. 1889. 

XTotes on geologic characteristics and 
economic minerals in part of the region be- 
tween the Kneoes and Colorado rivers. 

Bull. W 1 



Johns Hopkins University Circulars, 
Nos. 59-70. 

Geologic map of Baltimore region, 
Williams, G. H. 

Progress of work on Arcbean of Mary- 
land, Williams, G. H. 

Massive rocks and contact phenom- 
ena of "Cortlandt series," Wil- 
liams, G. H. 

Three excursions into soathem Mary- 
land, Clark, W. B. 

Bocks near Ilchester, Howard County, 
Maryland, Hobbs. ^ 

Archean geology of Missonri, Ha- 

WORTH. 

Bocks from Fernando Noronha, Gill. 

Geology of Baltimore region, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 

Cretaceous in Anne Arundel and 
Prince (George counties, Maryland, 
Clark. W. B. 

Contributions to mineralogy of Mary- 
land, Williams, G, H. 

Methods and models in geographic 
teaching, Davis, W. M. 

JOHNSON, Lawrence C. The structure 
of l^^lorida. 

Am. Jour. Sei., 3d series, voL 36, pp. 230- 
286. 1888. 

Abstract, "Notes on the geology of Flor- 
ida," Am. Assoc. Ady. Science, Free, vol. 36, 
pp. 216-217, 1 p. 1888. 

Section from St. Augustine to Gainesville. 
Description of Neocene in the Gainesville 
highlands, reference to rate of dip, and dis- 
oossion of relations, extent, and eqaivalenoy 
of the npper Eocene members in the Sink re- 
gion. 

[On the equivalency and members of 

the White limestone formation in the 
gulf Tertiary region.] 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee Reports, 1888, F, p. 7, 6 lines. 
Am. Geologist, voL 2, p, 273- 1888. 

^— [On the occurrence of Oligocene in 
Florida.] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee Reports, 1888, F, pp. 10-11, 9 lines. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 276-277. 1888. 

Beference to beds of supposed Oligocene 
equivalency. 



— Report. The iron regions of north- 
ern Louisiana and eastern Texas. Fif- 
tieth Congress, first sosion, H. R. Ex. 
Doc. 195, 54 pages; map. Washington, 

1888. 



98 



EECOED OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.75)i 



JOHNSON, Lawrence C. — Continned. 
Deioiiption of the Tertiary and its inclnded 
iron ores, the Cretaoeons "islands," and the 
Qaatemary, and discussion of the strati- 
graphio relations, equivalency, and extent of 
the members of the Tertiary. 

The " Grand Gulf' > formation of the 

Golf States. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d aeries, toI. 88, pp.218- 
216. 1899. 

Beview of opinions in regard to the geol- 
ogic position of the formation, and descrip- 
tion of a section along the ChiokasaTrha 
Biver in Mississippi in which its relations and 
stratigraphy are exposed. 

On Tertiary and Cretaceous of Ala- 
bama. See SMITH, Engene A., and. 

JONES, H. L. Geology and lithology of 
Mich] pioo ton Bay. See HBRRICKi 
C. L., TIGHT, W. G., and. 

J. T. W. Note on the geology of Halde- 
man County. 

Geol. and Sci. Bull., toI. 1, Jan., 1880, | 
coL 40. 

Beferenoes to Cretaceous and Quaternary 
formations. 

JULIEN, Alexis A. On the geology at 
Great Barrington, Massachasetts. 

New York Acad. Sci., Tfans., yol. 7, pp.21- 
80. 1888. 

Beferences to the general stratigraphy of 
the Stookbridge limestone, discussion of the 
relations at Great Barrlngton, and a detailed 
description of an overlying dolomitic series in 
that vicinity. 

Jura-Trias. 
Arkansas t Trinity formation, Hill, B. T. 
Jura, Neocomian, and chalk, Mar- 

cou. 
Pike Connty, Branner. 
California, Becker. Goodyear. Irk- 

LAN. Whiting. 
fossils. Cooper. 
petrography, Schuster. 
Canada, British Colnmbia, Bowman. 
Eozoic and Paleozoic, Dawson, J. W. 
gold-mining regions of Pacific coast, 

Bowman. 
fossils from coast of British Colnm- 

bia, Whiteaves. 
invertebrate fossils from Pacific coast, 

White, C. A. 
Mount Stephen, B. C, McConnell. 
northern part of the Dominion, Daw- 
son, G. M. 
northern Vancouver Island^ Dawson, 

G.M. 



Jura-Triaa— Con tin ned. 

Nova Boot! a, Aylesford, Kings 
Connty, Honeyman. 

Prince Edward Island, BAHt. 

Ynkon expedition, Dawson, G. M. 
Central America, plants, Newberry. 

Bosario mine, Hondnras, Leggbtt. 
Colorado, Aspen Mountain, Brunton. 

Bowlder Connty, Van Diest. 

Denver region, Eldridgb. 

field for original work in the Rocky 
Mountains, Hills. 

geology of Colorado ore deposits, 
Lakes. 

Leadville, Emmons, S. F. 

Mesozoic of southern Colorado, Ste- 
venson. 

northwestern coal region, Hewitt. 

oil fields of Fremont County, Ihlseng. 

report Rocky Mountain Division, U. 
S. Geological Survey, Emmons, S.F. 

San Juan region, Ihlseng. 

Trinidad coal region. Lakes. 

mountain npthrnsts, WmTB, C. A. 
Connecticut, topographic development| 
Davis, W. M. 

fishes and plants, Newberry, 

Hanging Hills, Chapin. 

intrusive and extrusive traps, Davis, 
W. M., and Whittle. 

Little Falls, Davis, C. H. S. 

Meriden ash-beds, Davis, W. M. 

Meriden, faults near, Davis, W. M. 

structure in Connecticut valley, Da- 
vis, W. M. 

trap ridges, Chapin. Davis, W. M. 

traps of East Haveu-Brantford re- 
gion, Hovey. 
Dakota, Black Hills, Carpenter. 

Crosby. 
Indian Territory, Trinity formation. 

Hill, R. T. 
Kansas, Hay. Hay and Thompson. 

paleontology of the plains, Cragin. 

lock-salt. Hay, R. 

region south of the great bend of the 
Arkansas, Cragin. 

salt of Ellsworth County, Baily, E. 
H. S. 

Trias of Kansas, Hay, R. 
Massachusetts, fishes and plants, New- 
berry. 

Hampshire County, Emerson. 

intrusive and extmsive traps, Davis, 
W.M. 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



99 



Jura- Trias — Continued. 

structure of trap ridges of Connecti- 
cut valley, Davis, W. M. - 
Mexico, Sonora coal field, Newberry. 

valley of Mexico, Chism. 

lower Cretaceous, White, C. A. « 
Montana, Gallatin Range, Hayden. 
New Jerseyy artesian wells. Cook. 

geologic map, Cook. 

red sandstone formation, Cook. Na- 

SON. 

fishes and plants, Newberry. 

map of vicinity of New York, Martin. 

topographic map, Davis, W. M. 

trap sheets, Darton. 
New Mexico, Mesozoic of northern, Ste- 
venson. 

Mosozoic, Marcou. 

original locality of Gryphase Pit- 
cheri. Marcou. 

Zufii Plateau and Mount Taylor, Dut- 
ton. 
New York, eastern limit of Trias basin 
on Staten Island, Newberry. 

map of vicinity of New York city, 
Martin. 

Staten- island outcrops, Britton. 

HOLUCK. 

Nomenclature and classification, report of 
sabcommittee on Mesozoic, Inter- 
national Congress of Geologists, 
Cook. Cope. 
faunas of lower Trias of Europe, 
Hyatt. 



Jura-Triaa — Continued. 

indebtedness of American geologic 
science to Canada, Dawson, J. W. 
interior North America, Cope. 
Mesozoic realm, Cope. 
Newark system, Russell, I. C. 
North Carolina, coals, Ashburner. 
coals, analyses, Clarke. Whit- 
field, J. E. 
decomposed trap, analysis, Chatard. 
Pennsylvania, Cumberland -Lebanon 
valley, dTnvillibrs. 
rivers and valleys, Davis, W. M. 
South America, Cerro de Pasco, Peru, 
Hodges. 
Sergi pe-Alago&s region, Brazil, 
Branner. 
Texas, condition of knowledge on the 
geology of Texas, Hill, R. T, 
lower Cretaceons, White, C. A, 
Mitchell County, Broadhead. 
south-central, Jermy. 
Permian, Hill, R. T. White, C. A. 
story of Colorado River, Hill, R. T. 
Trinity formation, Hill, R, T. 
western Texas, Hill, R. T. 
Virginia, natural coke from Midlothian, 
analysis, Riggs. 
Chesterfield County, gas and coal, 

Russell, I. C. 
Richmond coal fields, Clifford. 
Newell. 
Wyoming, report of Territorial Geolo- 
gist, Ricketts. 



K. 



Kansas, coal, Ashburner. Bailey, E. 

H.S. 
coal measures, Wooster. 
coal measures of Lyon County, Kelby. 
geology of Kansas. Lecture, Hay, R. 
history of geologic work in Kansas, 

Hay, R. and Thompson. 
horizon of Dacotah lignites. Hay, R. 
Leavenworth well, Jameson. 
limit of drift, Wooster. 
Missouri River, I^roadhead. 
moraines, Chamberlin, T. C. 
natural gas, Hay, R. 
nickel ore, Logan County, Dewey. 

Snow. 
note on remarkable fossil, Hay, R. 
notes on southwestern Kansas, St. 

John. 



Kansas — Continued. 

paleontology of the plains, Cragin. 

report on geology. Hay, R. 

region south of great bend of the 

Arli^UHas, Cragin. 
salt beds in Permian, Broadhead. 
salt deposits, Cox. Bailey, E. H. S. 

Hay, R. 
section in Wilson County, Hay, R. 
Trias, Hay, R. 
volcanic dasts. Hicks. 
Kansas Academy of Science, Trans- 
actions, voL 10. 
Section in Wilson County, Kans., 

Hay, R. 
Report on geology, Hay, R. 
Coal measures of Lyon County, 

Kelly. 



100 



BECOKD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 16S9. 



[BUI.L.78L 



Kanaas Academy of Science — Cont'd. 
Historical sketch of geological work 

in Kansas, Hav and Thompson. 
Natural gas in eastern Kansas, Hat, 

R. 
Note on a remarkable fossil) Hat, H. 
Horizon of Dacotah lignites, Hat, R. 
Salt in Ellsworth County, Kansas, 

Bailey, E. H. 8. 
Geology of Kansas, Lecture, Hat, R. 
Leavenworth well record, Jameson. 
Triassic rocks of Kansas; Hat, R. 
Composition of Kansas coals, Bailey, 
E. H. S. 
EZEDZIE, G. E. The bedded ore-deposits 
of Red Mountain mining district, 
Ouray County, Colorado. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., yol. 
16, pp. 570-581. 1888. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., yol. 46, pp. 104-106. 
1888. 4<>. 

Includes a description of the geologic rela- 
tions of the andesites, lower Carboniferoos, 
Archean qnartzites, stmctare, and glaciation. 
Analyses of limestone and andesite. 

KELLY, D. S. Coal measures of Lyon 
County. 

Kansas Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 10, p. 45. } p. 
1888. 

Beference to recent development of coal 
beds. 

[KEMP, James F.] [Fossil plants and 
rock specimens from Worcester, Mas- 
sachnsetts.] 

New York Acad. Sci. , Trans., toL 4, pp. 75- 
76, i p. 1887. 

Discusses the relation of the altered Car^ 
boniferous rocks to the associated crystalline 
schists. 

A diorite dike at Forest of Dean, 

Orange County, New York. 

Am Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 35, pp. 331-332. 
1888. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol^ p. 733, i p. 
1888. 

Occurrence, dimensions, petrography, 
analysis. 

Oc the Rosetown extension of the 



Cortlandt series. 

Am.' Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 36, pp. 247-253^ 
1888. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, p. 1020, ^ 
p. 1888. 

Description of occurrence, petrography, 
and composition of diorites, and reference to 
the relations of the associated metamorphio 
and altered rocks. Discussion of history and 
date of intrusion of the Cortlandt series. 



[EZEMP, James F.] — Continned. 
The dikes of the Hudson Riyer high- 
lands.. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 22, pp. 891-608, pL 12. 
1888. 
Description of ooourrence, faults, petrog- 
* raphy, and the Hudson Biver section of the 
hiclosing rooks. Discuassion of petrogr^hio 
oharaotoristics, age, history, date of meta* 
morphism, and development of contact lami- 
nation hi Indosing rocks, and conditions 
under which the dikes were intruded. 

The geology of Manhattan Island. 

New York Aoad. ScL, Trans., yoL 7, pp. 49- 
64, pL 1888. 

Description of drifts, gneissic rocks, lime* 
•tones, aud structural relations. Accompanied 
hy geologic map and cross-sections. 

On certain porphyrite bosses in 

northwestern New Jersey. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 8d series, toL 38, pp. 130-134. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, roL 23, p. 812, i p. 
1889. 

Description of occurrence and petrography 
of several small, detached areas in the yicin- 
ity of BeemersYille. 

— and MARSTERSk V. F. On cer- 
tain camptonite dikes near Whitehall, 
Washington County, New York. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 97-102. 1889. 

Abs tract, Am. Naturalist, voL 23, pp. Bll- 
812, 6 lines. 1889. 

Geologic relations, petrography, and compo- 
sition. 

[KENNISH, .] Artesian well at 

iSt. Augustine, Florida. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 8d series, vol. 34, p. 70, i p. 
1887. 
Statement of rooks penetrated. 

Kentucky, Geological Survey Re- 
ports. 

Pound Gap region, Crandall. 

Letcher, Harlan, Leslie, Perry, aud 
Breathitt counties, Hodgb. 

Lower north fork, middle and south 
forks, Kentucky River, Hodge. 

Spencer County, Linnky. 

Nelson County, Linney. 

Garrard County, Linney. 

Jackson purchase region, Lough- 
ridge. 

Kentucky fossil shells, Devonian, Si- 
lurian, Nettleroth. 

Kocks of central Kentucky, Linney. 

Henry, Shelby, and Oldham counties, 
Linney. 

Bath and Fleming counties, Linney. 



DAmcn.l 



HECOliD 01? GEOLOOY FOB 1887 TO 1886. 



101 



Kentucky, Oeological Surrey Re- 
ports — Continued. 

Maeon County, Linnet. 

Marion County, Knott. 
Kentucky, caves and caye life, Eings- 

I*KY. 

Clark Connty, Lin^t. 

coal, ASHBURNBR. 

coal and iron, Proctor. 

correlation of lower Silurian in the 

Ohio valley, Ulrich. 
earthquake phenomena, Freeman. 
Elliot County, Crandall. Diller 

and EuNZ. 
Qarrard County, Linney. 
geoloipc survey report, Proctor. 
Jackson purchase region. Lough- 
ridge. 
Letcher, Harlan, Lesley, Perry, and 

Breathitt counties, Hodge. 
Lincoln County, Linnet. 
lower north fork, middle and south 

forks, Eentucky River, Hodge. 
Mason, Bath, Fleming, Henry, Shelby, 

and Oldham counties, Linnet. 
Marion County, Enott. 
Mercer County, Linnet. 
Montgomery County, Linnet. 
natural gas, Fischer. 
Nelson County, Linnet. 
new horizons of oil and gas, Orton. 
Oriskany iron ore. Proctor. 
iperidotite of Elliott Connty, Cran- 
dall. Diller and Eunz. 

Proctor. 
peridotite, Elliott Connty, analyses, 

Chatard. 
petroleum, Shaler. 
phosphate of lime deposits, Bath 

County, Shaler. 
Pound Gap region, Crandall. 
. Spencer County, Linnet. 
- subdivisions of formations in western 

Eentucky, Proctor. 
terminal moraine near Louisville, 

Bryson. 
types of Devonian system in North 

America, Williams, H. 8. 
upper Cumberland valley, Mc- 

Creath and d'Invilliers. 
Washington County, Linnet. 
western Eentucky, coals and cokes, 

Allen. 

filEYES, Charles B. On some fossils 
from the lower coal measures at Des 
Moines, Iowa. 



KSTES, Charles B.— Continued. 

Am. aeologiit, vol. % pp. 23-28. 188& 
Includes references to the stratijjnrapfay, 
thickness, and dip of the series, and to its cor- 
relation with a portion of the coal measares 
of eastern Illinois. 

The coal measures of central Iowa, 



and particularly of the vicinity of Des 
Moines. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 396-404. 1888. 

Description of section, dip, thickness, and 
fknna of some of the members, and discussion 
of the extent and relations of the coal beds. 
Mention of discovery of soft Cretaceous sand- 
stone in drift, and reference to other similar 
occurrences. 

— Surface geology of fiurlington, Iowa. 

Am. Naturalist, yoL 22, pp. 1049-1054, pis. 
ZXUI, XIY. 1888. 

Topography, distribution, noteworthy ex- 
posures, relations, and history of glacial drifts 
and loess. Topographic map and cross-sec- 
tions. 

— On the fauna of the lower coal meas- 



ures of central Iowa. 

Philadelphia, Acad. Sci., Proc, 1888, part 
2, pp. 222-246. 

Preceded by a geologic description of the 
lower Carboniferous of the region. 

— The Carboniferous echinodermata of 
the Mississippi basio. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 38, pp. 186-193. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist. voL 24, p. 767, ^p. 
1890. 

Incidentally discusses some features of the 
Carboniferous history of the region. 

T- Note on the distribution of certain 



loess fossils. 

Am. O-eologist, vol. 4, pp. 119-121. 1889. 
Contains reference to its bearing on dimatio 
condition at time of loess deposition. 

— Lower Carbonic gasteropoda from 
Burlington, Iowa. 

Philadelphia Acad. Sci., Proc, 1889, pp. 
284r-298. 1889. 

Paleontologio descriptions, preceded by a 
brief review and discussion of the stratigraphy. 

John A. The falls of the Mis- 



sissippi. 

Popular Science Monthly, vol. 31, pp. 474- 
477. 1887. 

Describes some features of the geology of the 
region, and discusses the probable former po- 
sition and extent of the falls. 

KILLEBREW, J. B. The western iron 
belt of Tennessee. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 45, pp. 18-19. 
40. 1888. 
Includes some general references to geology. 



102 



ttfiCOBt) OF GfiOLOGt FOR 188t tO 1889. 



iBULL.t& 



KILLEBREW, J. B.— Continned. 
— Notes on the coal-field of sontliwest 
Virginia. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 47, pp. 6i-45. 
40. 1889. 

Beference to idtitudes and snccMsion of 
some of the coal beds. 

KINAHAN, G. H. Irish Esker drift. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 8d series. toL 83, pp. 276-278. 
1887. 

Beview of H. C. Lewis on Irish Eskers. 
Points ont the distinction between tme Ksk- 
ers and certain drift ridses, and discusses 
•ome of the phenomena of drift deposition. 

The terraces of the great American 

lakes, and the roads of Glenroy. 

Edinburgh Geol. Soc, Trans., voL 5, pp. 
221-223. 1887. 

Discusses the nature and origin of the lake 
terraces ; their relations to each other, to ice 
dams and surface deformation, and their sim- 
ilarity to the "washouts" of the diluvial 
flats of the West. 

XING, C. Henry. [Discovery of diato- 
maceons earth in wells at Atlantic City, 
l?ew Jersey.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 8, p. 16, 
6 lines. 1889. 

Includes statement of depth and suggestion 
in regard to its equivalency with the Kich- 
mond beds. 

KINGSLE7, J. S. Caves and cave life. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 1104-1106. 1888. 

Suggestion in regard to the age and history 
of the caves of the Indiana-Kentucky-Ten- 
nessee region. 

KINLE7, Isaac. The North American 
lakes. 

Popnlar Science Monthly, vol. 31, pp. 333- 
389. 1887. 

Discussion of some of the causes of forma- 
tion and extinction of lake basins, and the in- 
fluence of glacial agencies. 



KNOTT, W. T. Geological survey of 
Eentacky, John E. Proctor, Director. 
Report on the geology of Karl on 
Count y, 43 pages, map. [ 1887 f ] 

Description of beds f^om lower Hudson to 
upper sub-Carb(»iferous, and structural re- 
lations ; list of fossils. Accompanied by col- 
ored geologic map, and section of Washington 
and Marion counties, by /W. M. Linney and 
W. T. Knott, respectively. 

KNOWLTON, F. H. The fossil wood 
and lignites of the Potomac formation. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 3, pp. 99-106. 1889. 

Abstract, Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, 
vol. 87, pp. 206-208. 1889. 

Includes brief introductory remarks in re" 
gard to the age of the formation, and mode of 
occurrence of its floral remains. 

KOST, J. Florida State Geological Sur- 
vey, 31 pages. Tallahassee, 1887. 

Abstract, Science, vol. 9, pp. 446-447. 1887. 

Befers to the stratigraphic range of the 
Tertiary formation. Announces the discov- 
ery of f^ medial anticlinal which appears 
to have been uplifted at the close of the 
Eocene. Describes the general features of 
the deposits on either side of this axis and of 
the middle and western part of the State. Dis- 
cusses the geologic history of the formations, 
the origin of their materials, their disturb- 
ances, and evidence of recent subsidence in 
lower Florida. CalU attention to deposits of 
phosphate, clays, coal, and buildiifig stones. 

KX7NZ, George F. Is there a diamond 
field in Kentucy f See DILLER, J. S., 
and. 

KWONG YUNG KWANG. The 

Eaiping ct>al mine, North China. 

Am. Inst. Minining Engineers, Trans., 
vol. 16, pp. 95-108. 1887. 
Brief description of geologic relations. 



L. 



Lackawanna Institute of History and 
Science, Froc, vol. 1. 

Glaciation : Lackawanna- Wyoming 
region, Branmer. 

Glacial strlse in Wyoming-Lacka- 
wanna region, Branner. 

LAPLAMME, J. A. K. [On the lower 

Silurian rocks bordering the Lauren- 

tian to the north of the St. Lawrence.] 

Canada, G-eol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, Re- 
port, 1886, part A, pp. 36-3& 1887. 



LAFLAMME, J. A. K.— Continued. 

Beferences to boundaries, quarries of Tren- 
ton limestone at St. Albans, and relations in 
the vicinity of the city of Quebec. 

> 

Note sur le contact des formations 

pal^ozoiqueset arch^enes de la province 
de Quebec. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans , voL4, section 
IV, pp. 43-47. 1887. 

Describes localities at wbich the Trenton 
and TTtica are in contact witb the Archean, 
and discusses the conditions of deposition, 



DARTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



103 



ImAFIiAMMB, J. A. K. — CoDtinned* 
and relations of the elastics ; the obaraoteiis> 
tics and ancient anrfaoe of the crystalline 
rocks, and the structure and horizon of the 
Quebec group. 

•'— - Le gaz nature! dans la provinoe de 
Qa^bec. 

OanadAi Rojal Sec, Trans., yoL 6, section 
lY, pp. 1&-25. 1889. 

Conditions and horizons of occurrence, and 
record of wells. 

LAKES, A. Geology of the Aspon min- 
ing region, Pitkin Coanty, Colorado. 

Colorado School of lyUnes, Biennial Re- 
port, 1886, pp. 43-84, pis. 

Stmctural features, stratigraphy, geolog- 
ical history, occnrrence and genesis of the 
ore deposits, and general geological relations 
of the region ; brief reference to evidenoe of 
glacial action. 

The Trinidad coal region of southern 

Colorado. 

Colorado School of llCines, Report of field- 
work and analyses, 1886, pp. 83-102. 1888. 

Description of ooal-beds and inclosing 
strata, geologic relations and structure of the 
region, general section of strata along foot- 
hills of the Bocky Mountains, and dikes in 
coal series. 

The coal-field of Crested Butte, Gun- 
nison County, Colorado. 

Colorado School of Mines, Report of field- 
work and analyses, 1886, pp. 108-128, 2 plates. 
1888. 

Includes a description of the geologic rela- 
tions of the a^oining reglbn and of the asso- 
ciated Yolcanic rooks. 

Geology of Colorado ore deposits, 

CLix pages ; plates. Denyer, Colorado, 

1888. 

Also in Colorado School of Mines, Annual 
Report, 1887, pp. clix, pis. 

Includes a general sketch of the geology of 
Colorado ; descriptions and discussions of re- 
lations of sediments and volcanics in Yarious 
districts ; sections of the Bocky Mountains in 
Colorado; discussion of the origin, history, 
and relations of the ores, and of Newberry, 
Le Conte, and Emmons on the genesis of ore 
deposits, and extracts ft>om Emmons's de- 
scription of the LeadYille and Aspen regions. 

LANE, Alfred C. The geological tourist 
in Europe. 

Popular Science Monthly, yoI. 83, pp. 216- 
229. 1888. 
iflT References to certain interesting localities. 

— The geology of Nahant. [Abstract. ] 

Boston Soo. Nat Hist, Proc, Yol. 24, pp. 
91-95. 1889. 



LANE, Alfred C— Continued. 

Characteristics, relations, and distribution 
of the Ysrious crystalline rocks. Glaciation. 
EYidences of post-glacial oscillations of sea- 
IcYoL 

LANG, Herbert. Transcontinental rail- 
roads. 

Science, Yol. 11, pp. 73-74. 1888. 

ReYiew of opinio' js in regard to the relatiYe 
ages of the Sierra NcYada and the Cascade 
Range; description of the structure of the 
Cascade Range in the Santiam BiYcr region, 
and the relations of its granites, metamorphic 
slates, supposed Cretaceous, old and new 
eruptiYes and Miocene, and sketch of the ge- 
ologic history of the range. 

L ANGDON, Daniel W. , j r. Some Flor- 
id a Miocene. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 3d series, yoI. 88, pp. 322-324. 
1889. 

Announcement of the discovery of a new 
series to which the term Chattahoochee is ap- 
plied. Brief description of outcrops and re- 
lations, lists of fossils, and discussion of 
equivalency. 

LAFWORTH, Charles. Fossils from 
Kicking Horse Pass. 

Science, yoL 9, p. 320. 1887. 
Discusses equivalency of the lower Silurian 
beds in which they occur. 

Preliminary report on some grapto- 

lites from the lower Paleozoic rocks on 
the south side of the St. Lawrence from 
Cape Rosier to Tartlgo Eiver, from the 
north shore of the Island of Orleans, 
one mile ahove Cap Eouge, and from 
the Cove Fields, Quebec. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., vol.4, section 
lY. pp. 167-184. 1887. 

Considers the equivalency of the graptolite- 
bearing beds with English zones from middle 
Ordovician down. Beviews the evidence in 
regard to the horizon of the Korman's Kill 
beds near Albany, "Sew York. Gives a r6- 
Bum6 of the supposed stratigraphic relations 
of the strata of the south side of the St Law- 
rence from Cape 6asp6 to Tartigo Biver, and 
discusses their equivalency, exteusion, and 
structure. 

Note on graptolites from Dease River, 

British Columbia. 

Canadian Record of Soi., vol 3, pp. 141-142. 
1888. 

Greol. Magazine, 3d decade, vol. 6, pp. 3(X- 
81. 1889. 

19'otice of occurrence and brief reference to 
the equivalency of the containing beds. 

LARSSON, Per. The Chapin iron mine, 
Lake Superior. 



104 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL.7S. 



LARSSON, Per— Continued. 

Am. Inst. Mining Sngineen, Trans., voL 
16,pp. 119-128; plate. 1887. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., yoL44, pp. 348, 847, 
894-895. 1887. 

Brief description. Map, and sectiions show- 
ing geologic relations ia its Tioinity. 

LAVAQNINO, G. The Old Telegraph 
mine, Utah. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engneers, Trans., yol. 
16, pp. 25-33. 1887. . 

Briefly describes the porphyry, and its rela- 
tions to the associated Weber qnartsltes. 

LAWSON, Andrew C. Geology of the 
Eainy Lake region, with remarks on 
the classification of the crystalline 
rocks west of Lake Superior. Prelimi- 
nary note*. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, voL 83, pp. 473-480. 
1887. 

Sabdivides the rocks into five series ; an in- 
tmsive gronp provisionally termed Lauren- 
tian ; the Contchiching, overlain conformably 
and overlapped by the very different Kewa- 
tin, together with which it is penetrated by 
**Harouian" granites, diabases, and gabbros, 
and nnconformably overlain by the Keweena- 
wan "(Nipogon)." 

Some recent developments in Ar- 

chean geology, particularly in the 
Lake Superior region, as tend to mod- 
ify commonly accepted notions of rock 
metamorphism. 

Canadian Record of Science, voL 2, pp. 430- 
431. 1887. 

Brief abstract of paper read at sixth meet- 
iDg of 4he Boyal Society of Canada. Dis- 
cusses the application of the term "metamor- 
phism;** the correlation of the Horonian and 
Animikie and its eqaivalents, on the south 
shore of Lake Superior, their unconformity to 
the older rocks, and the separation of Huro- 
nian from the Archean. 

— — [Preliminary report on the region 
east of the Lake of the Woods.] 

Canada, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, Re- 
port, 1886, part A, pp. 11-14. 1887. 

Includes a discussion of the relations of the 
several series of crystalline rocks. 

The diahase dikes of Eainy Lake. 

Canadian Inst., Proc, 3d series, vol. 6, pp. 
173-185. 1888. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 199-211. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp, 348- 
349, i p. 1888. 

Petrographic description of s^eral dikes ; 
mineralogic, structural, and textural varia- 
tions from center to sides, age, history, and 
relatioBB to enclosing rocks. 



LAWSON, Andrew C— Oonlinaed. 
--'— Foliation and sedimentation. A re- 
ply to Prof. Alexander WinohelL 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 160-178. 1888. 

Discusses evidence of igneous nature, and 
history of foliation of scmie of the crystalline 
rocks of the Northwest. 

Foliation and sedimentation. 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 276-279. 1889. 

Definition of his views in regard to the his- 
tory and relations of the Arohean rocks of 
theNorthweetand diseossioB of the nature of 
the Bo-ealled oimglomerates in the gneisses. 

Scapolitebearing rooks of Canada, 

etc. See ADAMS, Frank D., and. 

LB CONTB, Joseph. The flora of the 
coast islands of Califomia in relation 
to recent changes of physical geog- 
raphy. 

Am. Jonr. Sd.. 8d series, toL 84, pp. 457- 
460. 1887. 

Califomia Acad. Sci., Bull., voL 2, pp. 515- 
620. 18874 

Am. aeologist, vol. 1, pp. 76-«l. 1888. 

Abstract, Nature, voL 37, p. 358, 9 lines 
1887. 

A discussion of the post- Tertiary physical 
changes of the coast region of Califomia as 
indicated by the flora and fauna of the out- 
lying islands. 

[Nomenclature, snhdivision, charac- 
teristics, classification of emptives, ori- 
gin of some members, and evidences of 
life of the Archean, and on the nomen- 
clature of the lower Paleozoic] 

International Congress of Greologists, Am. 
Committee, Reports, 1888, A, pp. 55-^7. 

[On the use of the term "Taconic."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee, Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 3 lines. 
Am. aeologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 

[On nomenclature of Cenozoic forma- 
tions.] 

International Congress of Greologists, Am. 
Committee, Reports, 1888, F, pp. 17-18, f p. 

Am. Greologists, xoL. 2, pp. 283-284. 1888. 

Discussion of a designation for the present 
time, reference to the nomenclature of the 
Tertiary, and the position of Cenozoic uncon- 
formity in California. 

On the origin of normal faults and 

of the structure of the basin region. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 38, pp. 257- 
263. 1880. ^ 

Abstract, Nature, vol. 40, pp.4&-47, 16 lines. 
1889. 

Discussion of the origin and mechanism of 
faults, especially of the class to which '* Great 



DASVOH.l 



B,ECOM> OY ailOLOGY FOE 1887 TO 1889. 



105 



IiE CONTB, Joseph— Coutinned. 

Basin " stmotare is dne^ and of the age aod 
history of those In the Sierra Nevada and 
Oreat Basin. 

LEB, S. £. Geology of Boone County. 
See GORLXIT, S. S., and. 

Maxinknchee. fc5ee THOMPSON, 

W. H,, and, 

LBGGETT, Thomas H. Notes on the 
Rosario mine at San Jnancito, Hondu- 
ras, Central America. 

Am. Inst Mining Engineers, Trans., toI, 
17, pp. 432-448. 1889. 

Includes a description of the geologic fea- 
tures of the region and a discassion of the ori- 
gin of its ores. 

LZSIBERG, John B. Some notes upon 
the more recent fossil flora of North 
Dakota and an inquiry into the causes 
that have led to the development of 
the treeless areas of the Northwest. 

Blinnesota, Acad. Sci., Boll., voL3, part 1, 
pp.l4fi-151. 1889. 

Discusses eyidence of Tarioos kinds indi- 
cating Gontinnoos slow elevation of the coun- 
try. • 

LESLE7, J. P. A dictionary of the fos- 
sils of Pennsylvania and neighhoring 
States named in the reports and cata- 
logues of the Survey* Pennsylvania 
Geol. Survey Report, P4, pages xiv, 
438, zzxi. Harrishurg. 1889. 

Contains incidental references to geologic 
formations in which some of the species occur. 

Revision and correction of the semi- 
bituminous coal section at Wellersburg 
in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. 

Pennsylvania, G^eol. Snnrey, Atlas to Re- 
ports, H H and H H H, pp. 349-360. 1889. 

An account of the components and relations 
of the coal measures at that locality. 

LESQUEREUX, Leo. On the character 
and distribution of Paleozoic plants. 

Pennsylvania, Geol. Survey Report for 1886, 
part 1, pp. 457-522. 1887. 

Includes a discussion of geolo^c distribu- 
tion of floral remains, the genesis of coal, the 
evidence afforded by paleobotany of the condi 
tions of deposition of some of the formations, 
and the equivalency of different members and 
portions of the lower Carboniferous of the 
United States. 

Prof. L. F. Ward's synopsis of the 

flora of the Laramie group. 

Am. Jonr. Sol., 3d series, voL 34, pp. 487- 
488. 1887. 

Review of some stratigraphic relations of 
the Laramie flora. 



LESQUEREUX, Leo -Continued. 

fossil plants collected at Golden, 

Colorado. 

Harv., Mns. Oomp. Zo61., Bull., voL 16, pp. 
43-59. 1^0.3. 1888. 

In summary, pp. 57-59, discusses strati- 
graphic position of the plants, and floral rela- 
tions of Fort Union and Laramie groups. 

Fossil plants of the coal measures of 

Rhode Island. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 221^230. 
1889. 

List of species and statement of opinion in 
regard to their age. 

LEVERETT, Frank. Glacial phenom- 
ena of uorthern Indiana and northeast- 
ern Illinois. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, p. 808, \ p. 1889. 

Nature, voL 40, pp. 657-558, \ col. 1889. 

Abstract of paper read to American Asso- 
ciation. 1889. 
An account of morainea 

On the occurrence of the "forest 

bed" beneath intra-morainic drift. 
[Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, vol. 37, pp. 
183-184, 1 p. 1888. 

Account of its geographic and stratigraphic 
distribution in northeastern Illinois. 

Raised beaches of Lake Michigan* 

Wisconsin Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 7, pp. 
177-192. 1889. 

Description of their physiography and de- 
posits, with incidental suggestions in regard 
to some details of their history. 

LEWIS, Elias, jr. Woodham artesian 
well, on Long Island, 2 miles east, of 
East New York, on the line of the 
Long Island Railroad. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, p. 233, \ p. 
1889. 

Five hundred and seventy-seven feet, 
through drift to gneiss. 

LEWIS, H. Caryill. Comparative stud- 
ies upon the glaciation of North Amer- 
ica, Great Britain, and Ireland. 

Rept. Fifty-sixth Meeting, British Assoc. 
Adv. Sci., 1886, pp. 632-635. 1887. 

Geol. Magazine, 3d decade, vol. 4, pp. 28-32. 
1887. 

Described in the bibliography for 1886. 

On some important extra-morainal 

lakes in central England, North Amer- 
ica, and elsewhere daring the period of 
maximum glaciation, and on the origin 
of extra-moraioal bowlder-clays. 
Nature, vol. 36, p. 573, \ p. 1887. 



106 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 7S. 



4 



LEWIS, H. CarvUl— Continued. 

Oeol. Magasine, 3d decade, yoL 4, pp. 515- 
617. 1887. 

British Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc.| Report, 
1887, pp. 092-603. 1888. 

Points ont the relations of extra-morainio 
clay deposits in America and in general, and 
disonsses the location and extent of extra* 
morainal lakes indicated by deposits of bowl- 
der-clay in England, and the nature of the 
glaciation of England. 

— [Remarks on P. H. Uhler's paper on 
the Albimpean formation in eastern 
Maryland.] 

Am. Phil. Soc. , Proc. , vnl. 25, pp. 53-54. No. 
127. 1888. 

Objections to the term "Albimpean," and 
suggestion that its sandstone members are in 
part Paleozoic 

LINDAHL, Joshna. Dr. N. O. Hoist's 
studies in glacial geology. 

Am. Naturalist, toI. 22, pp. 589-598, 705-713. 
1888. 

Condensed translation of *' Om de glaciala 
rullstens&same, " and " Ber&ttelse om en i geo- 
logiskt s^fte foretagen resa till Gronland.*' 

LINDGREN, Waldemar. The silver 
mines of Calico, California. 

Am. Inst Mining Engineers, Trans., yol. 
15, pp. 717-734^ plate. 1887. 

Description and sections of the region, and 
discussion of the lithologio, stratigraphic, 
and structural features of the *' Tertiary" 
sandstones, tuff dei>osits, "liparite,"andande- 
site, and their relations to the ore deposits. 

Notes on the geology of Baja, Cali- 
fornia, Mexico. 

Oalifomia Acad. Sci.,Proc., 2d series, toL 
1, pp. 173-196, pis. 1-5. 1889. 

Description of Pleistocene, Tertiary, Creta- 
■ ceous, eruptives, basal granites, and struc- 
tural features. Dlustrated by plates of cross- 
sections and colored geologic map. 

LINNET, W. M. Report on the geology 
of Clark County. 

Kentucky, Greol. Survey, John R. Proctor, 
Director, Report on the Geology of Clark 
and Montgomery Oonntieft, pp. 1-43. Map. 
[1887?] 

Description of stratigraphy of beds from 
Chazy limestone to lower coal measures. Ac- 
companied by a colored geologic map with 
cross-section. 

Geological Survey of Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Reports on the 
geology of Bath [and Fleming coun- 
ties], 86 pages. Map. [Date ?] 

Description of formations from Carbonifer- 
ous to Ordivician; considers silicification and 



LINNET, W. M.— Continued. 

alteration in texture in some of the lime- 
stones ; gives an account of the flexures of 
the region. Dlastrated by a colored geologic 
map. 

Geological Survey of Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Report on the 
geology of Garrard County, pp. 31. 
Map. [1888 f] 

Description of beds firom Chazy limestone 
to upper sub-Carboniferous. List of fossils. 
Accompanied by a colored geologic map. 

Geological survey of Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Reports on the 
geology of Henry, Shelby, and Oldham 
counties, 70 pages. Hap. [Date?] 

Descriptions of formations from Ordovician 
to Devonian, alluvial terraices, and distnrli- 
ances. Illustrated by colored geologic map. 

Geological Sorveyof Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Report on the 
geology of Lincoln County, 37 pages. 
Map. [1887 1] 

Description of beds from Trenton limestone 
tosubCarbonifeious, and structural relations. 
* Accompanied by a colored geologic map. 

Geological Survey of Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Report of the 

geology of Mason County, 31 pages. 

Map. [Date?] 

Description of formations from Niagara to 
lower Hudson, and alluvial. List of fossils. 
Illustrated by colored geologic map. 

GeologicalSurvey of Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Report on the 

geology of Mercer County, 29 pages. 

Map. [1887 1] 

Description of beds from Chazy limestone to 
sub-Carboniferous. Brief references to flex- 
ures. Accompauied by a colored geologic 
map. 

Report on thegeology of Montgomery 

County. 

Kentucky, Geol. Survey, John R. Proctor, 
Director, Report on the G-eology of Olark and 
Montgomery Counties, pp. 45-75. Map. 
[18871] 

Description of stratigraphy of beds from 
Trenton limestone to lower coal measures and 
of structural relation and fault in Clark and 
Montgomery counties. Discussion of condi- 
tions under which some of the foimations 
were deposited, evidence of erosional nncou- 
formities between some of the beds, and the 
extent and relations of the fault 

Report on the geology of Nelson 



County. 



DABtOK.3 



RECORD Of GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



107 



IiINNET, W. M.— Continued. 

Eentiicky, Q>eol. Survey, John R. Prootor, 
Director, Report on Spencer and Nelson 
Oonnties, pp. 21-58. Hap. * [1888 ?] 

Description of beds from lower Hadson to 
apper sab-Carbon\feroas. Reference to posi- 
tion and relations of npUft. Aocompanied by 
a colored geologic map. 

Report on the geolof^y of Spencer 

Connty. 

Eentncky, Gtool. Snnrey, John R. Proctor, 
Director, Report on Spencer and Nelson 
Ctonnties, pp. 1-19. Map. [1888 ?J 

Description of beds of the Hadson Biver 
gronp, aocompanied by a colored geologic' 
map. 

Geological Survey of Kentucky, John 



R. Prootor, Director. Report on the Ge- 
ology of Washington County, 24 pages. 
Map. [1887 1] 

Description of Niagara and Trenton beds. 
Reference to sti^ctnre and its relation to 
drainage. List of fossils. Accompanied by 
colored geologic map aud section of Washing- 
ton and Marion connties by W. M. Linney 
and W. T.Knott, reex>ectively. 

Geological Survey of Kentucky, John 

R. Proctor, Director. Notes on the 
rocks of central Kentucky, with list of 
fossils, 19 pages. [Date 1J 

Beviewof stratigraphy of the Ordovician, Si- 
lurian, and Devonian formations and account 
of the flexures' of the region. Incidentally 
considers equivalency of some of the Silurian 
and Ordovidan members. 

Liveipool Geological Association, 
Journal, voL 8. 
Arctic current and floating ice as fac- 
tors in Canadian geology, Gas- 
king. 

lOCKINGTON, W. N. The neighbor- 
iiood of Seville. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 165-166, j p. 
(February, 1889.) 
Sketch of its geology. 

^ORD, N. W. Natural and artificial 
<2ements. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Econo- 
mic Geology, pp. 671-695. 1888. 

Includes reference to beds of hydraulic 
luDestone, analyses of certain limestones, 
and an analysis of black shales from Colum- 
bus. 



LOUGHRlbGE, R. H. Geological Sur- 
vey of Kentucky, John E. Proctor, Di- 
rector. Report on the geological and 
economic features of the Jackson pur- 
chase region, embracing the counties 
of Ballard, Calloway, Fulton, Graves, 
Hickman, McCracken, and Marshall, 
357 pages. Plates. 3 maps in pocket. 
1888. 

Abstract [in regard to fault], Am. Jour. 
Sci. , 3d series, toI. 37, p. 232, 11 lines. 1889. 

Includes descriptions of formations from 
Cretaceous to recent and sub-Carboniferous 
and of the deep well and fault at Paducah. 
Discussion of equivalency, correlation, origin, 
extent, and relations of some of the forma- 
tions and geologic history of the region at 
various stages. Analyses. Reference to rela- 
tions and extent of Paleozoic border rocks in 
Missouri, Illinois, and Kentucky; agricul- 
tural features, distribution, composition, and 
characteristics of soils and clays. Descrlp- 
tions of geology by counties. Accompanied 
by«colored geologic map, map showing thick- 
ness of gravels, and a soil map. 

Louisiana, iron ores, analyses, Riggs. 
iron regions, Johnson. 
Petite Anse salt, Bolton. Cox. 

Pome ROY. 
relations of Grand Gulf series, HiL- 

6ARD. 

Tertiary, Hkilprin. Hilgard. 
LOVBJOY, Ellis. The Pomeroy and 
. Federal Creek coal-field. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Econo- 
mic Greology, pp. 627-652. Map. 1888^ 

Description of upper coal measures and up- 
per barren measures. 

LOW, A. P. Preliminary report on an 
exploration of country between Lake 
Winnipeg and Hudson Bay. 

Canada, G-eol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, Re- 
port, 1886, part F, pp. 1-19. 1887. 

Abstract, Ibid., part A, pp. 26-28. 

Includes pp. 17-18, notes of distribution 
and character of Lanrentian, Huronian, lower 
Paleozoic limestone and drift. Keference to 
glacial striae. 

LYMAN, Benjamin Smith. Geology of 
the Low Moor (Virginia) iron ores. 

Am. Inst. 'Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
14, pp. 801-809. 1886. 

Describes structural relations and discusses 
the horizon of the ferriferous stratum. 






108 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.75w 



M. 



McCHARXiES, A. Notes on the ge- 
ology of the Winnipeg district, Mani- 
toha (Abstract). 

Edinburgh O^ol. Soc, Trans., yoL 6, pp. 
831-333. 1887. 

Gives section of drifb and describes out- 
crops of fossiliferous Silurian and Ordovioian. 

The foot-steps of time in the Bed 

^ River Valley, with special reference to 

the salt springs and flowing wells to 

be fonnd in it. 

Manitoba, Hist and Soi. Soc, Trans., No. 
27, pp.ia 1887. 

Describes Archean, Ordovician, Silnriao, 
Devonian, Cretaceous, and Quaternary forma- 
tions. 

McCONNELL, B. G. Report on the 
geological structure of a portion of the 
Bocky Mountains, accompanied by a 
section measured near the 5l8t parallel. 

Canada, Geol. and If at. Hist. Survey, Re- 
port, 1886, part D, pp. 41, pis. 2. 1887. 

Abstract; Ibid., part A, pp. 7-9, Geol. Mag- 
azine, 3d decade, roL 6, pp. 133-134, \ p. 1889. 

Description of Cretaceous, and formations 
from Carboniferous to Cambrian; flexares 
and series of overthrust faults. Discussion of 
some stratigraphic and stractaral relations. 
Accompanied by plate of colored sections. 

Note on the geology of Mount Ste- 
phen, British Columbia. 

Am,. Geologist, vol. 8. pp. 22-25. 1889. 
Description of stratigraphy and structure 
of the Mount Stephen region. 

McCRSATH. A. S., and D'INVIL- 
LIERS, E. v. Comparison of some 
Southern cokes and iron ores. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
15, pp. 734-763. 1887. 

Brief statement in regard to geologic rela- 
tions at Birmingham, Alabama. 

Mineral resources of the upper Cum- 
berland valley of southeastern Ken- 
tucky and southwestern Virginia trib- 
utary to the proposed Cumberland 
valley extension of the Louisville and 
Nashville railroad, 152 pages, map. 
Louisville, 1888. 

Brief prefatory sketch of the general geol- 
ogy and structure, and detailed description 
of the coal measures. 

The New River — Cripple Creek min- 
eral region of Virginia. See D'lNVIL- 
\ £. v., and. 



McQEB, W J Bepori. 

17. S. Oeol. Surrey, Sixth Report, J. W. 
PoweU, 1884.'85, PP.25-3S. 188S. 

Account of geologie oartographio work of 
the Survey. Kotioe of stadiea of the terraces 
of the central eastern United States, and other 
investigations. 

Some features of the recent earth- 
quake. 

Sci. Am., Bnpt., vol 23, pp. 9305-0206, No. 
67». 1887. 
From Science, voL 8, pp. 271-275. 1888. 

Ovibos cavifrons froin the loess of 

Iowa. 

Am. Jour. Sci. , 3d series, vol. 84, pp. 217-220. 
1887. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 126-127, 
I p. 1887. 

Discusses the olimatio conditions of the 
loess period as indicated by its fauna ; the re^ 
lations of the loess to the drift in Iowa and 
adjacent regions ; the early Quaternary sab- 
mergence of the middle AUanUo slope, and 
the attendant climatio conditions; the extent 
of refrigeration in glacial times, and the posi- 
tion of the strata yielding the Ovibos remains 
at New Madrid and Fort Gibson. 

— ->- The Tuscaloosa formation. Sum^ 
mary of previous observations and 
opinions. 

Tertiary and Cretaeeous stMta of I^ttsca* 
loosa, Tombigbee, and Alabama rivers, by £!« 
A. Smith and L. C. Johnson, TT. S. Geol. SuT' 
vey. Bull., vol. 7, pp. 247-255. No. 43. 1887. 

Discussion of age, correlation, and relations 
of Tuscaloosaand Potoihac formations. 

B^sum^. 

Tertiary and Cretaceous strata of Tusca- 
loosa, Tombigbee, and Alabama rivers, by E. 
A. Smith and L. C. Johnson, TJ. S. Geol. Sur- 
vey, Bull., voL 7, pp. 285-290. No. 43. 1887. 

Beferences to characteristics, stratigraphy, 
and relations of the formations and sketch of 
their history. 

The geology of the head of Chesa- 
peake Bay. 

n. S. Geol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 537-646, pis. 56-71. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 113-115. 
1889. 

Description and analysis of the physiogra- 
phy of the Chesapeake Bay region, and of the 
coastal plain in general; description of the 
Columbia and Potomac formations, and their 
relations in the various exposures, and discus- 
sion of their genesis, history, and taxonomy ; 
synopsis of taxonomy of the glacial depositik 



DABTOH.J 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



109 



McGEB, W J— Continued. 

of the middle Atlantio dope; brief references 
to Archean (t) allurial, Appomattox, and Sas> 
safiras Birer greensand ; disouesion of evi- 
dence of a displaeement bonnding the coastal 
plain on the west, its position, extent, amount, 
Inflaence on drainage, and topography, date, 
history, rate, and oaase ; the genetic relations 
of topo^aphic forms in general, and the 
Qoaternary history recorded in the Colambia 
formation; and prognostication in regard to 
the occurrence of artesian waters in the region. 
Accompanied by a stereogram of the middle 
Atlantic slope. 

— Report Potomac Division of (Je- 

ology. 

n. S. Oeol. Snrrejy Serenth Report, J. W. 
FoweU, 1885-'86, PP.104-11L 1888. 

Includes a reference to theeqniyalency and 
history of the Potomac and Tuscaloosa forma* 
tions. 

' — Thiee formations of the Middle At- 
lantio Slope. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 8d series, yoL 85, pp. 12&- 
143, 828-^30, 907-388, 44S-466, pis. n, VI, YU. 
1888. 

Abstract. Nature, yoLBS, p. 91, 15 lines, p. 
190, 11 lines. 1888. Am. O-eologist, voL 2, pp. 
12»-13L^ 1888. 

Description of character, distribution, and 
relations of the Potomac and Columbia for> 
mations, and of a new later Tertiary forma- 
tion, designated the "Appomattox,** from 
^orth Carolina to New Jersey. Discussion 
of stratigraphic relations, origin of materials, 
Conditions of deposition, taxonomy, and bear< 
ing on geologie history, especially on the 
Quaternary. Synopsis of literature of the 
Oohimbia ftvmaiion and of the glacial history 
«>f the United States. Accompanied by a 
stereogram of the middle Atl^tic slope. 

— — The classification of geographic 

foTms by genesis. 

National Geogr. Mag., vol 1, pp. 27-30. 



McGEE, W J— Continued. 

ware Valley and the relations of the Trenton 
grayels. 

[On some peculiarities of the super- 



Definition- and dassiflcation of geologic 
l^hen<Hn6na and discussion of their relation to 
t^lie gmesis of geographic features. 

The Columbia formation. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, yoL 36, pp. 

11-222. 1888. 

General notice. Discussion of origin and 
xnode of deposition of its materials and cli- 
Yuatic conditions indicated by its stratigraphy 
«iiid relations. 

Paleolithic man in America : his an- 
"U^uity and environment. 

pQpnlar Science Monthly, vol. 34, pp. 20-36. 
1888. 

Isfthidsa a sketch of the glacial history of 
If ortlLAmetifia,. especially of the^ lower Dda- 



ficial deposits of northeastern Iowa. J 

Am. Geologist, toL 2, pp. 137-138, | p. 1888. 

Brief reference to forest bed intercalated 
between the drifts, the occurrence of kames 
and asar, the distribution of the loess, and 
certain anomalous relations of the drainage. 

— Notes on the geology of Macon 
County, Missouri. 

St. Louis, Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 6, pp. 
30&-336. 1888. 

Description of topography, the alluvial, 
aquo-glacial and glacial deposits, the Carbon* 
iferons rooks and coals, and stmcture. Dis- 
cussion of classification of plains, sketch of 
Pleistocene history, and correlation of coal- 
beds and of the strata pierced by drill-holes. 

— Topographic types of northeastern 



Iowa. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 808, } p. 1889. 

Abstract of paper read to American Asso- 
ciation, 1889. The abstract consists of an ac- 
count of some characteristics of the drainage 
systems. 

Geological antecedents of man in 

the Potomac valley. 

Am. Anthropologist, vol. 2, pp. 227-234. 
3889. 

Comprises a brief sketch of the Potomac 
and Pleistocene history of the Middle Atlantic 
slope. 

McINNES, W. Portions of counties of 
' Ne^ Brunswick. See B ALLEY, L. 
W., and. 

McKEUi AR, Peter. The correlation of 
the Animikie and Htironian rocks of 
Lake Superior. 

Canada, Royal Soc, Trans., vol. 5, section 
IV, pp. 6i-73. 40. 1888. 

Description and discussion of characteristics, 
structure, and contact relations, and discus- 
sion of equivalency and history of the Huro- 
nian, Animikie, Keweenawan, "Nipigon," 
and overlapping formations in the Lake Su* 
perior regions. Beferenoe to relations of Hu* 
ronian and Laurentian. 

McRAS, John C. The geological forma- 
tion at Port Colborne as shown by drill- 
ing for natural gas. 

Canadian Inst., Proc, voL 6 (new series), 
pp. 338-341. 1889. 

Gives 1,500'foot well record and a north and 
south section through the Niagara peninsula, 
from Lake'Ontario tp.Lake Erie, 



110 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75, 



[MaoFARLANE, Thomas.] [On the 
use of the term **Taconic."] • 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 

Oommittee, Report, 1888, B, p, 17, 3 linea 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 188dr 
BefercDce to its application to some pre- 

Cambrian rocks. 

On the Aiohean. See FRAZER, 

Report on Archean. 

Maine, Aroostook Connty, Bailet. 

bowlder deposits, Chamberlin. 

enlargements of aogites in peridotites 
from Little Deer iHlaud, Merrill, 
G. P. 

Farmiogham clay, Robinson. 

glaciation of monotains, Upuam. 

osar and moraine, Chamberlin. 

Paleozoic and volcanic series near 
Eastport, Shaler. 

post glacial history and volcanic ash- 
beds on coast, Shaler. 

relations between geology of Maine 
and New Brunswick, Bailet. 

Silurian system of northern, Bailey. 

terminal moraines, Stone. 

Manchester Geological Society, 
Transactions, voL 19. 
Richmond coal-field, Virginia, Clip- 
ford. 

Manitoba, Historical and Scientific 
Society, Transactions, No. 27. 
Red River Valley geology, Mc- 

CHARLE8. 

MARCOXJ, Jules. On the use ftf the 
name Taconio. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc , vol. 23, pp. 
343-355. 1887. 

A plea for the retention of ** Taconio *' as a 
gronp name for the primordial, and the rele- 
eation of Cambrian to the rocks of the second 
fanna instead of *'Ordovician." Discnsses 
the history of ''Taconic," and gives a table 
showing the classification of the lower Paleo* 
zoic accoiding to Sedgwick, Murchison, Em- 
mons, Barrande, Marcon, Lapworth, and Wal- 
cott, and a list of papers on the subject. 

Paleontologic and stratigraphio 



" principles " of the adversaries of the 
Taconic. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 2, pp. 10-23, 67-88. 1888. 

Discussion of paleontologic, stratigraphio, 
and structural relations of the Taconio sys- 
tem, especially in review of C. D. Walcott's 
paper, "The Taconic system of Emmons, and 
the use of the name Taconic in geologic no- 
meuclature." 



MARCOXJ, Joles— Continued. 

Geology of the yicinity of Quebec 

city. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 855-356. 1888. 

References to horizon, and relations of slates 
nnoonformably underlying the Trenton at 
Quebec and Montmorenoi foils. 

The Taconic of Georgia, and the re- 
port on the geology of Vermont. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Memoirs, voL 4, pp. 
105-131, pL 13. 40. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 328-329, 
I p. 1888. 

Consists of a discussion of the relations in 
northwestern Vermont and the Quebec re- 
gion, the Loraine shales versus the Hudson 
Biver gronp, the horizons of tb« graptolitio 
sone of eastern America, the classification 
and nomenclature of the geology of Vermont, 
the history of Emmons's map of Ifew York, 
and the history, classification, and use of the 
name *' Georgia." 

Some remarks on Prof. Henry S. 

Williams's report of the subcommittee 
on the upper Paleozoic (Devonic) in 
the American Geologist for October, p. 
226. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 60-61. 1889. 
Discussion of some points in the history of 
the nomenclature of the New York DeTonian. 

— ^ Barrande and the Taconic system. 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 118-137. 1889. 
Historic and controversial. 



— The original localitygof the Gryphaea 
Pitcheri, Morton. 

Am. Geologist, vol 3, pp. 188-193. 1889. 

Includes adiscnsAion of the absence of Neo- 
eomian in New Mexico and. reference to the 
extent of the Jurassic formation of the Tu- 
oumcari area of Texas. 

— The Mesozoic series of New Mexico. 



Am. Geologist, voL 4, pp. 155-165, 216-229. 
1889. 

Beviews the investigations of Maroon, New- 
berry, LeConte, Hayden, and Stevenson, and 
discusses the classification of the New Mexi- 
can and Texan Mesozoic series. 

— Jnra Neocomian and chalk of Ar- 
kansas. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 357-367. 1889. 

Beview of B. T. Hill on the '* Neozoic Ge- 
ology of Southwestern Arkansas.** "Discusses 
the general stratigraphio statements concern* 
ing the Mesozoic formations, and reviews the 
paleontology and equivalency of the Trinity 
and Cretaceous. 

— On some dates of the '^Report on 
the Geology of Vermont,** 



DABT0H.1 



EECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



Ill 



MAR con, Jules— Continued. 

Botson Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc.,Yol.24,pp. 83- 
89. 1889. 

Review of yarioas historic qnestions con- 
cerning the Taconio in Vermont publications. 

MARGARHS, Emm. de. Presentation 
d'un relief en plditre de la Pennsylvanie 
an nom de M. J. P. Lesley et observa- 
tions Bur les plissements des terrains 
pal^ozolqnes. 

Soc. a-6ol. de France, Boll., 3d series, tome 
15, pp. 356^57. 1887. 

Discnsses the plications of an area^n cen- 
tral Pennsylvania ; as exhibited by a stereo- 
gram of the flexares at the snrfaoe of the 
*'Hedina'* sandstone. 

MARSH, O. C. Notice of a new genns 

of Sauropoda and other new Diuosau- 

ria from the Potomac formation. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 88-94. 

1888. 
Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol, 1, p. 136, | p. 

1888. 

Includes a brief reference to the uncertain- 
ties in regard to the age Indicated by these 
fossils, 

Restoration of Brontops robustos, 

from the Miocene of America. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, toL 37, pp. 163-165, 
pLVL 1889. 

Includes very brief reference to subdiyisi- 
bility of Brontotherium beds of the eastern 
flanks of the Booky Mountains. 

The sknll of the gigantic Ceratop- 

sidsB. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., vol. 38, pp. 501-506, plate xn. 

1889. 

Includes a reference to the geologic horizon 
of the *'Ceratops bed" audits persistence for 
many hundred miles along the east flank of 
the Bocky Mountains. 

MARSTBitS, y. F. On certain camp- 
tonite dikes near Whitehall, Washing- 
ton County, New York. See KEMP, 
J. F., and. 

MARTIN, D. S. The "Field of rocks" 
[11 miles west of Philadelphia]. 

New Tork Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 7, pp. 
16-18. 1888. 

Description of isolated bowlder-covered 
areas, and suggestion in regard to the origin 
of the bowlders. 

.^ [Remarks on the distinctness of the 

New York gneiss from the crystalline 
rocks of the Highlands.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 7, p. 64, 
A p. 188& 



MARTIN, D. S.— Continued. 

Geological map of New York City 

and vicinity, 2 miles to 1 inch. New 
York, 1888? Accompanied hy an explan- 
atory text, pp. 14. 

A colored wall-map, showing areal distribu- 
tion of geologic formations within a radius of 
40 miles from New York. The accompanying 
pamphlet gives a brief general account of ge- 
ologic relations of the region. 

Maryland Academy of Sciences, 
Transactions, voL 1. 
Cretaceous and Eocene of Maryland, 
Uhleb. 

Maryland, age of Potomac formation, 
Ward.' 
Antecedents of man in the Potomac 

valley, McGek. 
Albirupe^ and associated forma<- 
tions, Heilprtn. Lewis, H. C. 
Uhler. 
Archean geology, Williams, G. H. 
Baltimore gabbros, Wiluams, G. 11. 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

Columbia formation, McGee. 
Cretaceous in Ann Arundel and 

Prince George counties, Clark. 
Cretaceous of southwest Maryland, 

Bryan. 
Eocene and Cretaceous, Uhler. 
excursions into southern counties, 

Clark. 
geology of the Baltimore region, 

Williams, G. H. » 

geology of head of Chesapeake Bay, 

McGeb. 
infusorial earth, Day. 

mineralogy, Williams, G. H. 

plan for map of Baltimore region, 

Williams, G. H. 

Potomac woods and lignites, Enowl- 

TON. 

Eeport of Potomac Division, U. S. 
Geological Survey, McGee. 

rocks from near Ilchester, Howard 
County, HoBBS. 

Sauropoda from Potomac formation, 
Marsh. 

three formations of the middle At- 
lantic slope, McGeb. 

Massachusetts, Hampshire County 
Gazetteer, 1654-1887. 
Topography—geological features, 
Emerson. 



112 



RECORD OF QEOLOGT FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



IBUU..7S. 



Massaohnsetts. Archeftu of western, 
Dana, J. D. 

Carboniferous plants and rookSi 
Kbmp. 

contour map, Davis, W. M. 

Connecticat lake of Champlain per- 
iod, Ea^rson. 

crystalline limestones, Hunt. 

deposits of phosphates of lime, Sha- 

IrBR. 

conglomerates in gneisses, Hitch- 
cock. 

dikes in Someryille County, Davis, 
W.M. 

drumlins and glaciation, Chamber- 
LIN, T. C. 

fishes and plants from Trias, New- 
berry. 

fluviatile swamps and terraces, Sha- 

LER. 

fossils in lower Taconic of Emmons, 

Walcott. 
Gay Head, Merrill, F. J. H. 
geology at Great Barrington, Julien. 
geology of Martha's Vineyard, Sha- 

LER. 

geological recreation, Honetman. 
geology of Nahant, Lane. 
geology of Nantucket, Shalbr. 
geology of outer islands of Boston 

Harbor. Crosby. 
geology of vicinity of Salem, Sears. 
Hampshire County, Emerson. 
horizon of Nahant limestone, 

FOERSTE. 

old beaches near Boston, Davis, W. 

M. 
pot holes at Cohasset, Bouv^. Up- 

HAM. 

prihciples of adversaries of the Ta- 
conic. Marcou. 

report on geology of Rhode Island, 
Providence Franklin Society. 

seacoast swamps, Shaler. 

structure of drumlins, Upham. 

Taconic, Dana, J. D. Hunt. Wal- 
cott. 

Tertiary and Quaternary of south- 
eastern, Shaler. 

Triasof Connecticut Valley, structure 
and topography, Davis, W. M. 

traps of Connecticut Valley, Davis 
and Whittle. 

MATTHE'W, G. F. A preliminary notice 
of a new genus of Silurian fishes. 



MATTHE'W, G. F.— Continiied. 

New Bnuunriok, Nat Hist. Soc, Boll. Ifo. 
6, pp. 60-78. 1887. 

Discusses the reUlions of the G<nit«ining 
beds in the Kerepis mils to mMnbers of the 
Passamsqaoddy Bay series. 

On the Cambrian faunas of Cape 

Breton and Newfoundland. 

Canada, Rofal Soo., Trans., vol. 4, section 
IV, pp. 147-167. 1887. 

I>e8cribes foasfls representing the older or 
Psradoxides fiinna in Newfimndlaad and tbe 
later forms of the Olenns fsnna in Cape 
Breton. Ddherihes ooonrrence of the fossils 
and discusses equivalency of the cmtaiaing 
and associated formations. 

Illustrations of the fauna of the St. 

John group, No. IV. 

Canadian Record of Science, roL 2, p. 432, | 
* p. 1887. (Brief abstract of pap«r read at sixth 
meeting of Boyai Society of Canada.) 

Mainly paleontologlc. Considers the St. 
John group the representatiye of nearly the 
whole Cambrian and the fauna of the Pots- 
dam to be tbe eqaiyalent of that of the shallow 
water deposits of the St. John group. 

On psammiohnites and the early 

trilobites of the Cambrian rocks in 
eastern Canada. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 1-9. 1888. 

Includes some incidental referenoes to 
stratigraphy, equivalency, and paleontologlc 
relations of the containing rocks. 

On a basal series of Cambrian rocks 



in Acadia. 

Canadian Record Science, voL 3, pp. 21-29. 
1888. 

Bead to Natural History Society of New 
Brunswick, 1888. 

Description of a series nnconformably un- 
derlying the St. John group in New Bmns- 
wick and the paradoxldes beds in Newfound- 
land, and comparison with formations at 
apparently the same horizon in Norway and 
Wales. 

— On the classification of the Cambrian 
rocks of Acadia. 

Canadian Record Science, voL 8» pp. 71-Ql. 
1888. 

Beferences to limitations of the CMubrian. 
system, and the occurrence and extent of Its 
several members. Discussion of faunal rela- 
tions, equivalency, and range of the suIh 
divisions, especially of the Georgian series. 

— On the classification of the Cambrian, 
rocks in Acadia, No. 2. 

Canadian Record Science, vol. 3, pp. SOS- 
SIS, 371-372. 1889. 

Discussion of position, of Olenellns fiauna, 
comparison of sections in Sweden and Hew. 



DABrOM.J 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



113 



MATTHE'W, G. F.— Continaed. 

Bnmswick, and review of the relations and 
eqaivalenoy of the Olenellna faanae of the 
Pacific slope in the western Territories of the 
United States. 

On some remarkable organism of the 



Silnrian and Devonian rocks in south- 
ern New Brnnswick. 

Oanada, Royal Soc. , Trans. , vol. 6, section 
IV, pp. 49-54, pi. 4. 1889. 

Inolades a brief account of the stratigraphy 
of the formations and statements in regard to 
their general relations and to their equiva- 
lents elsewhere. 

— How is the Cambrian divided? 
" * * A plea for the classification 
of Salter and Hicks. 

Am. aeologist, voL 4, pp. 139-148. 1889. 
A general discussion of the paleontologio 
relations and classification of the Cambrian. 



\f A. D. The Stillwater, Minne- 
sota, deep well. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 341-342, | p. 1889. 

Science, vol. 13, p. 401. 1889. 

General description of its record (3,400 feet). 
Calls attention to the positive evidence pre* 
sented in regard to the stratigraphic position 
of the Keweenawan. 

Meriden Scientific ABSociation, 
Transactions, vol. 2. 
Catopterus gracilis, Davis, C. H. S. 
Hanging Hills^ Chapin. 

voL 3. 

Ash bed at Meriden, Davis, W. M. 
Trap ridge at Meriden, Chapix. 

BCBRRILL, F. J. H. Note on the Green 
Pond Mountain group of New Jersey. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 6, p. 59, 
fp. 1887. 

Stat«ment.in regard to age and general re- 
lations. 

Geological stractnre and age of the 

deposits at Gay Head, Massachusetts. 
[Abstract.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 4, pp. 78- 
79. 1887. Two lines, as follows: 

Expre8si<m of opinion in regard to age of 
beds. 

Index of cvrrent literature relating 

to American geology. 

School of Mines Quarterly, voL 8, pp. 285, 
375, vol. 9, pp. 85-87. 1887. 

Arranged by aabjects: geology, mineralogy, 
paleontology, topography, etc. 

Gieen Pond Mountain group. 

Bull, 75 8 



MERRILL, F. J. H.— Continued. 

New Jersey, Oeol. Survey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 112-122. 1887. 

Abstract, Science, vol 9, pp. 595-596, ^ p. 
1887. 

Describes some structural and stratigraphic 
relations near Newfoundland, New Jersey, 
which indicate that at least a portion of the 
group is equivalent- to the Oneida, the asso- 
ciated fossil! ferous limestones, Lower Hekler. 
berg, and the slates, Hamilton. Announces 
the discovery of Corniferous and Oriskany 
fossils in quartzite near Newfoundland and 
Longwood. Gives a r6sum6 of the stratig- 
raphy of the region. 

Yellow gravel. 

, New Jersey, G-eol. Survey, Report of the 
Geologist for 1886, pp. 129-134. 1887. 

Describes the distribution, character, and 
relations, and discusses its age and the origin 
of its materials. 

MSRRILL, George H. Great dike at Par- 
adise, Newport, R. I. See CROSB7, 
W. O., and BARTON, G. H. 

MERRILL, George P. The literature 
of geyserite. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 436-437, | p. 1888. 

Calls attention to announcements of volcanic 
origin of some supposed geyserite formations 
and to the confirmatory results of a reexam* 
ination of some deposits in Montana and 
Nebraska. 

Note on the secondary enlargement 

of augites in a peridotite from Little 
Deer Isle, Maine. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 488- 
490. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 1006- 
1007, 7 lines. 1890. 

Petrographic. 

Concerning the Montville serpen- 
tine. 

Science, vol. 11, p. 302, | p. 188a 
Refers to its occurrence in the crystalline 
limestone, and discusses the evidence and 
bearing of its metasomatic origin. 

[ ] [Examination of rock with which 

nickel occurs in Nickel Mountain, Ore- 
gon.] 

IT. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources of 
the n. S., 1887, p. 128, i p. 1888. 
Statement of its constituent minerals. 

On the ophiolite of Thnrman, War- 



ren County, New York, with remarks on 
the Eozoon Cauadense. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 189-> 
191. 1889. 



114 



RECORD OP QEOLOQY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



f BULL. 75. 



MERRILL, George P. — Continned. 

Disciusion of its origin and the nature of 
the orifpnal rook. 

On the serpentine of Montv ille, New 

Jersey. 

XT. S. National Mnseam, Proc.| vol. 11, pp. 
105-111, pl& XXXI, xxxii. 1889. * 

Inclndes a reference to the presenoe of a 
trap dike at the locality. 

On a peridotite from Little Deer 

Island in Penobscot Bay, Maine. 

TJ. S. National Musemn, Proc, toI. 11, pp. 
191-195, pU XXXIV. 1889. 

Description of ita relations, micropetro. 
graphy, and composition. 

Among the Pennsylvania slate qnar- 

ries. 

Sci. Am. , Snpt., vol. 27, pp. 10874-10875 (No. 
681). 1889. 

MERRITT, W. C. On an ascent of 
Monnt Loa A letter to J. D. Dana, 
dated July 28. 

Am. Jonr. Sci. , 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 51-52. 
1889. 

An account of condition and topography of 
the crater. 

MERRITT, William Hamilton. The 
minerals of Ontario, and their devel- 
opment. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 293-300. 1889. 

Includes statements in reganl to the rela- 
tion of the Animikie and Huronian in the 
Port Arthur district 

Mexico, age of coal in Rio Grande re- 
gion, White, C. A. 

Baja California, Lindgrex. 

Catorce mining district, Chism. 

drainage of the Valley of Mexico, 
Chism. 

geologic observations, VOM Rath. 

Jorullo, Felix. 

Jurassic, Hill, R. T. 

Lower California copper mines, 
Wkndt. 

lower Cretaceous, White, C. A. 

relations of Laramie, White, C. A. 

metamorphism in Sonora coal field, 

NEWTBERRy. 

Sierra Mojada, Chism. 

Sonora earthquake, Goodfellow. 

MEYER, Julius. Floods in the lower 
Missouri. 
Science, vol. 12, pp. 167-168, | p. 1888. 
Discussion of the conditions affecting cor- 
raeion. 



MEYERf Otto. Beitragzar Kenntniss 
des Alttertiars von Mississippi nnd Ala- 
bama. 

Frankfnrt-SenokMibergische IT a turf, 
aesell. , Bericht, a. 8, tat l-n. 1887. 
Paleontologia 

Some remarks on the present state 

of our knowledge of the North Ameri- 
can eastern Tertiary. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 88-94. 1888. 

Discussion of the paleontologio, strati- 
graphic, and stmotoial relationa, equivalency 
and relative positions of the eeveral mem- 
bers. 

Blichigan, Arcbean rocks of the North- 
west, Winchell, a. 
Cbapin iron mine, Larbsox. 
classification of Cambrian and pre- 
Cambrian, Irving. 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

correlation of Animikie and Haro- 
nian, McKellar. 

Gogebic iron region, £ng. and Min- 
ing Journal. 

gold fields, Parker. 

granite of the Northwest, Hali^ 
C. W. 

granite and qnartzite contact at 
Ironwood, Winchell, N. H. 

great primordial qnartzite, Winch- 
ell, N. H. 

Huronian ^oup, Irving. 

iron ores of Menonomie range, Ful- 
ton. 

Irving and Cbamberlin on Lake Sa- 

perior sandstone. Am. Geologist. 
lake beaches, Ann Arbor, Spencer. 

WOOLBRIDGE. 

[Marquette and Gogebic regions], 
Winchell, A. Winchell, N. H. 

metamorphism of eruptives on south 
shore of Lake Superior, Williams, 
G. H. 

Penokee-Gogebic iron ores. Van 

HiSE. 

post-glacial geology of Ann Arbor, 

WOOLBRIDGE. 

phosphate in Ludington mine, 
Browne. 

report : Lake Superior division, U. S. 
Geol. Survey, Irving. 

river-lake system of western;. Wool- 
bridge. 

raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Levbrbtt. 



SABTOV.] 



B£COBD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



115 



Michigan —Cod tinged. 

salty Wyatt. 

Tacooio system, Miller. 

Trentoa limestone as an oil forma- 
tion, Orton. 

types of Devonian system in North 
America, Williams, H. S. 

MUiIiBR, S. A. The Taconio system as 
established by Emmons, and the laws 
of nomenclatore applicable to the sub- 
ject. 

Am. G^aolos^itt, vol. 1, pp. 235-245. 1888. 

History of Taconio system and Haronian, 
St John's, and Georgia groaps. R6sani6 of 
oharaoteristics, distribution, relations, and 
eqaivaleney <tf the groups. 

MILLS, James £. Quaternary deposits 
and Quaternary or recent elevation of 
regions and monutains in Brazil, with 
deductions as to the origin of loess 
from its observed conditions there. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 345-361. 1889. 

An account of the characteriHtics and rela- 
tions of the saperflcial deposits, and discus- 
sion of their origin and history wad of evidence 
of recent uplift of the region. 

Minnesota Academy of Sciences, 
Bulleftin, voL 3, No. 1. 

Glacial moraines of Minnesota, Up- 

HAM. 

Ice currents in eastern Minnesota, 

Upham. 
Greology of Mankato, Bkchdolt. 
Lingnia and paradoxides in red quart- 

Zite, WiNCHBLL, N. H. 

Copper mining in Minnesota, Hall, 
C. W. 

Trenton limestone at Minneapolis 
and St. Paul, Hall, C. W. 

Artesian well boring in southeastern 
Minnesota, Hall, C. W. 

Fossil flora of North Dal^ota, and de- 
velopment of treeless areas, Lei- 

IDBRO. 

Descriptions of maps of Minnesota, 

UPHAli. 

Minnesota, ecological and Natural 
History Survey, Bulletin No. 2. 

Peridotites, gabbros, diabases, and 
andesytes of Minnesota, Wads- 

WORTH. 



No. 5. 



Hatnial gas in Minnesota, Winch- 
BLL,N. H. 



Minnesota, Ctoology of; Final Report, 
vol. 2. 

Preface, Winchkll, N. H. 

Wabasha County, Winchell, N. H. 

Goodhue County, Winchell, N. H. 

Dakota Connty, Winchell, N. H. 

Carver and Scott counties, Upham. 

Sibley and Nicollet counties, Upham. 

McLeod County, Upham. 

Renville Connty, Upham. 

Swift and Chippewa counties, Up- 
ham. 

Kandiyohi and Meeker counties, Up- 
ham. 

Wright County, Upham. 

Hennepin County, Winchell, N. H. 

Ramsey County, Winchell, N. H. 

Washington County, Winchell,N.H. 

Chisago, Isanti, and Anoka counties, 
Upham. 

Benton and Sherburne counties, 
Upham. 

Stearns County, Upham. 

Douglas and Pope counties, Upham. 

Grant and Stevens counties, Upham. 

Wilkins and Traverse counties, 
Upham. 

Ottertail County, Upham. 

Wadena and Todd counties, Upham. 

Crow Wing and Morrison counties, 
Upham. 

Mille Lacs and Kanabec counties, 
Upham. 

Pine County, Upham. 

Becker County, Upham. 

Clay County, Upham. 

Minnesota Geological and Natural 
History Survey, Fifteenth Report. 
Geological Report (Vermilion Lake 

region), Winchell, N. H. 
Report on northeastern Minnesota, 

Winchell, A. 
Report of observations, Winchell, 
H.V. 

Sixteenth Report. 



Report, Winchell, N. H. 

Report of geological survey in Min- 
nesota, 1887, Winchell, A. 

Report of observations made during 
the summer of 1887, Winchell, 
H.V. 



Seventeenth Report. 



Crystalline rocks of Minnesota, 
Winchell, N. H. 



116 



BECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



iBULUTS. 



IdinneBota Geological and Natural 
History Survey, Seventeenth Re- 
port—Continued. 

Obserrations in iron regions, 1888, 

WiNCHBLL, H. V. 
Observations in northeastern Minne- 
sota, 18da, Grant. 
List of papers 1872-1889, on crystal- 
lines of Northwest, Winchell, 
N. H. 
Minnesota, Animikie slates and quartz- 
ites, WiNCHlBLL, N. H. 
Animikie-Vermilion unconformity, 

WmcHELL, A. 
artesian wells. Hall, C. W. 
beaches of glacial Lake Agassiz, 

Upham. 
changes in ice currents in glacial 

epoch, Upham. 
classification of Cambrian and pre- 

Cambrian, Irving. 
oopper mining, Hall, C. W. 
correlation of Animikie and Huron- 

ian, McKellar. 
crystalline rocks, Winchell, N. H. 
description of some maps, Upham. 
diabasic schists with jaspilyte, Win- 
chell, H. V. 
driftless area, Chambbrlin, T. C. 

Chamberlin and Salisbury. 
Cretaceoas outliers, Am. Geologist. 

Winchell, N. H. 
eccentricity theory of glacial cold. 

Falls of St. Autliony, Claypole. 
ernptives, Winchell, N. H. 
foliation and sedimentation, Law- 
son. Winchell, A. 
fossils in red quartzite, Winchell, 

N.H. 
falls of the Mississippi « Keyes, J. A^ 
geology of Mankato, Bechdolt. 
geology of central counties, Upham. 
geology of, preface, Winchell, N. H. 
geology of Wabasha, Goodhue, Da- 
kota, Hennepin, Ramsey, and 
Washington counties, Winchell, 
N.H. 
glacial moraines, Upham. 
great primordial quartzite, Win- 
chell, N. H. 
granite of the Northwest, Hall, C. W. 
Huronian group, Irving. 
iron region, 1888, Winchell, H. V. 
Irving and Chamberlin on Lake 



JliSinneBOta^Continued. 

Superior sandstones. Am. Geolo- 
gist. 
natural gas, Winchell, N. H. 
northern, Winchell, H. V. 
northeastern, Grant. Winchell, A. 

Winchell, N. H. 
northwesterly, Winchell, H. V. 
norytes and gabbros, Hbrrick. 

Clark and DemiNg. 
origin of Keewatin ores, Lawson. 
peridotites, gabbros, diabases, and 

andesytes, Wadsworth. 
phosphorus in Ludington mine, Mich- 
igan, Browne. 
quartz-keratophyre from Pigeon 

Point, Bayley, W. S. 
recession of ice sheet and relations of 

gravels at Little Falls, Upham. 
report— division of glacial geology, 
U. S. Geological Survey, Chamber- 
lin. 
spotted rocks from Pigeon Point, 

Bayley. 
Stillwater deep well, Mbades. 
stratigraphy of the Huronian, Win- 
chell, N. H. 
Trenton limestone at Minneapolis 

and St. Paul, Hall, C. W. 
Taconic system, Miller. 
two systems confounded in the 

Huronian, Sblwyn. 
unconformities of the Animikie, 

Winchell, A. 
well at Albert Lea, Gordon. 
Vermilion Lake and other iron re- 
gions, Winchell, N. H. Winch- 
ell, H. V. Van Hise. 
Mississippi, abbence of separable Oligo- 
cene, Aldrich. 
carbonate iron ores, BraiNerd. 
Grand Gulf formation, Johnson. 
loess and clays, analyses, Biggs. 
North American Tertiary, Meyer, O. 
orange sand and loess, Chamberlin, 

T. C. 
relations of Grand Gulf series, HiL- 

gard. 
Report of subcommittee on Cenozoic, 

Smith, E. A. 
relations of gulf Cretaceous, Hill, 

R. T. 
Tertiary and Cretaceous, Smith and 

Johnson. Heilprin. Meyer. 
white limestone formation, Johnson. 



DASTON.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



117 



Missouri, Archean geology, Ha worth. 
Carboniferoutt eobinodermata, 

Krykb. 
Chonteau group, Rowley. 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

forms of ore deposits in limestone, 

Hbnrich. 
gas Id eastern Kansas, Hay, R. 
history of Ozark uplift/ Broad- 

HISAD. 

hammoeks and bowlders of decompo- 
sition, Spencer, J. W. 

Silarian adjoining Jackson parcbase, 
Kentucky, Loughridge. 

Missouri River, BroadIibad. 

sub-Carboniferous at Sedalia, Samp- 
son. 

lead and zinc, Clekc. 

loess and clays, analyses, Riggs. 

Macon County, McGbe. 

moraines, Chamberlin. 

sand bowlders in drift, Spencer, 
J. W. 



Missouri— Cotin ned. 

types of Devonian system in Nortb 
America, Williams, H. S. 

Montana, Butte City, Rainbow lode, 

Blake. 
Devonian, Hayden. Walcott. 
Drumlummon veins, Clayton. 
Gallatin region, Hayden. 
. geology of Butte, Emmons, S. F. 
glacial geology, Chamberlin. 
Great Falls coal field, Newberry. 
Iron Butte, Calvin. 
Report U. S. Geological Survey, 

Hayden. 
volcanic asb, Merrill, G. P. 
volcanic asb analyses, Clarke, 

F. W. Whitfield, J. E. 

MORRIS, Cbarles. Tbeories of tbe 
formation of coral islands. 

Philadelphia, Acad. Sci., Proc, 1888, pp. 
41»-420. 1888. 

Discaasion of Darwin's and Mnrray'a 
theories. 



N. 



NASON, Frank L. On tbe location of 
some vertebrate fossil beds in Hon- 
duras, Central America. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 486-- 
487. 1887. 

Notice of beds of clay holding "diorite" 
bowlders, and of evidence of » former lake. 

A new locality of tbe camptonite of 
Hawes and Rosenbnscb. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 3d series, vol. 88, pp. 2*29-230. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Ifataralist, voL 23, p. 812, 3 
lines. 1889. 

Describes the occurrence and petrography 
oftwo dikes in the Green Moantains, south- 
east of Rutland, Vermont. 

Tbe Triassic rocks or tbe red sand- 
stones of New Jersey. 

New Jersey, Oeol. Sanrey, Report for 1888, 
pp. 18-44, pL 1889. 

Mainly a summary and review in the light 
of recent studies; also includes a t^lassifica- 
tion of tiie stratigraphy, and a discussion of 
structural relations, and of stratigraphic and 
physiographic evidence of tbe existence of 
great faults. 

FATHORST, A. 6. Tbe position of tbe 
Olenellns beds. 

Am. Gtoologist, voL 2, p. 358, i p. 1888. 
Betoences to the relative positions of the 
Olenettofl and paradoxldes beds. 



NATHURST, £. O. Formation of coal 
seams. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 45, pp. 194-195. 
4P. 1888. 

Discussion of origin and mode of deposition 
of materials. 

National Geographic Magazine, vol. 1. 
Geographic methods in geologic in- 

. vestigation, Davis, W. M. 
Classification of geographic forms by 
genesis, McGbb. 

Nature, 1887. 

Extra-morainal lakes and clays, 

Lewis. 
Fossil woods from western Canada, 

Dawson, A. M. 
Work of International Congress of 

Geologists, Gilbert. 

1888. 

Superficial geology of northwest Can- 
ada, Tyrrell. 
On crystalline schists, Hunt. 

1889. 



Fall of rocks at Niagara, Clatpolb. 
American Association Proceedings. 

Nebraska, clay from Pine and Cherry 
counties, Reed. 



118 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



Nebraska — Continaed. 
coal, Abhburnsr. 
continuance of Lake Cheyenne, 

Todd. 
CretHoeoos, Chamberlin, T. C. 
crystalline rock in Pawnee Connty, 

RUSSSLL, F. W. 
diatomaceons earth, Hicks. 
fossil bone in well at Lincoln, Am. 

Geologist. 
geyserite. Hicks. 

literature of geyserite, Merrill, G. P. 
Mesozoic, Marcou. 
marl from Cheyenne County, Am. 

Geologist. 
peat bed in Loup County, Russell, 

F.W. 
Quaternary, Chamberux, T. C. 
Report Division of Glacial Geology, 

U. S. Geological Survey, Chamber- 

LIN, T. C. 
salt well at Lincoln, Russell, F. C. 
soils. Hicks. 

Terraces of the Missouri, Todd. 
Tei-tiary quartzite, Hicks. Todd. 
volcanic dust. Hicks. 
volcanic dust, analysis, Clarke. 

NETTELROTH, Henry, 1889. Ken- 
tucky fossil shells. A monograph of 
the fossil shells of the Silurian and De- 
vonian rooks of Kentucky. Kentucky 
Geol. Survey, J. P. Proctor, Director, 
245, iv, pages, 36 plates. 4^. Frankfort, 
Ky., 1889. 

(Contains a short prefatory chapter on geo- 
logic principles and periods. 

Neues Jahrbuch fiir Mineralogie, Gto- 
ologie[etc.], 1887. 

Micro-petrography of California 
rocks, Schuster. 

Norites of Cortlandt series, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 

Peridotite of Elliott County, Ken- 
tucky, Diller. 

Perowskite in serpentine, Williams, 
G. H. 

Pleonaste in norite, Williams, G. H. 

Rutile and ilmenite in diabase, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 

Nevada, classification of Cambrian, 
Matthew. Walcott. 
Devonian, Williams, H. S. 
dry lakes, Jenney. 
equus beds, Cope. 
faDlta of Sierra Nevada and Basin 



Nevada — Continued. 

ranges, Diller. Gilbert. Bus- 
sell, I. C. Lb Conte. 

glaciers, Emmons, 8. F. , 

marbles, Newberry. 

obsidian, Iddinos. 

primary quartz in basalt, Iddinos. 

quicksilver deposits, Becker. 

Report California Division, U. S. Ge- 
ological Survey, Becker. 

stratigraphio portion of Olenellns, 
Walcott. ^ 

Trias, Cope. 

glaeiation of peaks of Sierra Nevada, 
American Geologist. 

Washoe rocks, Becker. 

NB^WBBRRT, John S. Some recent 
discoveries of rock salt in western New 
York. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., voLi, pp. 55- 
57. 1887. 

Discassea the ezt«it of the Salina salt de- 
poidta, and the origin and variations in com- 
position of the salt. 

The Great Falls coal-field, Montana. 

School of ZCines Quarterly, voL 8, pp. 327- 
330. 1887. 

Describes the occurrence of lower Creta- 
oeoos fossils in the ooal basin, and discusses 

the equivalency of some members of the Amer- 
ican CretaceoDs. 
Kersantite — a new building stone. 

School of Mines Qnarterly, voL 8, pp. 33^ 
338. 1887. 

Occars penetrating the orystaUine schists 
near Croton Tending, Westchester County, 
New Yorlc. I>e8cril>es occurrence and petro- 
graphy. - 

The origin of graphite. 

School of Mines Quarterly, vol. 8, pp. 334- 
335. 1887. 

Describes metamorphosed coal of the upper 
Trias in the Sonora coal-field, Mexico. 

Earthquakes. What is known and 

believed about them hy geologists. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 6, pp. 
18-35. 1887. 

Discussion of the nature, causes, and effects 
of earthquakes, and of volcanism and crustal 
movements in generaL 

[Middle Camhrian trilobites from 

near Poughkeepsie. ] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 8, p. 113, 
ip. 18S7. 
Expression of opinion in regard to horizon. 

L l[On the "Taconio System" of 

Emmons.] 



dabtoh] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



119 



WSWBISRRT, John S.— Continued. 

New York Acad. Sci., Traxu., vol. 6, p. 138, 
A p. 1887. 

Statement of opinion in regard to the status 
of Emmons's generalisation. 

Fossil lushes and fossil plants of the 

Triassic rocks of New Jersey and the 
Conneotiont valley. 

ir. S. Geol. Surrey, Monograph, No. 14, 
sv, 122 pages, 2(1 plates, io, Wi|shington, 
188& 

Abstracts, New York Acad. Sci., Trans., 
Tol. 6, pp. 124-128^ 1887 ; Am. Natnralist, vol. 
22, p. 889, 1 p., 1888 ; Am. Jonr. Sci. , 3d series, 
ToL 38, pp. 77-78, 1889; Am. Geologist, vol. 
i, pp. 187-188, I p., 1889; Popular Science 
Monthly, voL 36, pp. M2-563, | p. 1890. 

Includes (pp. 3-15) geologic sketch of the 
oharacteristio features of the conti^ing 
rocks ; reference to conditions under which 
they were deposited, and to the origin of their 
materials ; and a discussion of their structure, 
former extent, and equivalency. Also, refer- 
ence to the age, history, and relations of the 
Jura and Trias of western United States. 

— Rhetic plants from Honduras. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 30, pp. 342-351, 
pi. VIII. 1888. 

Includes a brief reference to the relations 
of the plant-hearing beds. 

Statements in regard to stratigraphic posi- 
aksm oi oil-bearing strata, and disscussion of 
the origin of gas andoiL 

[On the nomenclature of the Amer- 
ican lower Paleozoic] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee, Reports, 1888, B, pp. 13-17. 
Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 203-207. 1888. 

— [On nomenclature of the Tertiary 
formations, and on the inclusion of the 
" Quaternary " in the Tertiary.] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am.- 
Oommittee, Reports, 1888, F, p. 15, | p. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 281. 1888. 

[ — ] [Significance of overlap of Cre- 
taceous on Archean on Staten l8land.] 

Vew York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol.7, p. 39, 
iVp. 1888. 

As indicaUve of the position of the orig- 
iasl eastern limit of the Trias. 

— Triassic plants from Honduras. 

Vew Yoric Acad. Sci., Trans., voL 7, pp. 
118-115. 1888. 

Abstract, Nature, voL 39, p. 70, 4 lines. 1888. 

Includes statement in regard to age indi- 
cated by the remains. 

[■ — "} [Remarks on the origin of salt 
deposits.] 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 7, pp. 
12(^127, i p. 1888. 



NEWBERRY', John S.— Continued. 
The coals of Colorado. 

School of Mines Quarterly, voL 9^ pp. 327- 
341. 1888. 

Abstraot^Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 439-490^ 
ip. 1888. 

Description of relations of Laramie coal 
beds and associated strata of the western 
Laramie belt. Crested Butte district. Gunni- 
son Mountain, Coal basin, Glenwood Springs 
district, PIfion baun, and White Mountain 
country. Discussion of the stratigraphic po- 
sition, distribution, and faunal reUtionsof the 
Fort Union group and the "upper" and 
lower Laramie. 

The origin of the loess. 

School of Mines Quarterly, voLlO, pp.88- 
69. 1888. 
Discussion of aqueous versus eoUan theories. 

Marble deposit* of the western 

United States. 

School of Mines Quarterly, vol. 10, pp. 89- 
72. 18d8. 

Refers to marbles of eastern ITnited States, 
and describes deposits in southwest Nevada, 
southwest Utah, and western Colorado. De> 
scribes geologic relations in Tempiute Moun< 
tain, Nevada. 

Devonian plants from Ohio. 

Cincinnati, Soc. Nat. Hist., Jour., voL12, 
pp. 48-56, pis. 4-6. 1889. 

Incidentally refers to stratigraphic pobition 
of the plant-bearing beds, to the conditions of 
deposition during Cornif erous times, and to the 
equivalency of the Gasp^ series. 

The new oil field of Colorado, and 

its bearing on the question of the gene- 
sis of petroleum. 

New York Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 8, pp. 
25-28. 1889. 

Abstracts, Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 
46, pp. 408-499. i°. 1888; Popular Science 
Monthly, vol. 34, p. 142, | col; Am. Assoc. 
Adv. Sci., Proc, vol. 37, pp. 186-187, 1889; 
Sci. Am. Supt., vol. 27, pp. 10948-10949, No. 
685, 1889; School of Mines Quarterly, vol. 10, 
pp. 97-102, 1889. 

Statements in regard to horizon of oil-bear- 
ing strata and discussion of the origin of oil 
and gas. Includes a brief summary of the 
geologic column in the Glenwood Springs 
region. 

History of the great American lakes. 



[Abstract. ] 

Sci. Am. Supt., vol. 28. pp. 11505-11506, No. 
720, tS, col. Folio. 1889. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol. 48, pp. 201-202. 
4°. 1689. 

Read to Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, 1889. A 
general sketch of the post-Triassic history of 
central eastern North America. 



120 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



NeTKT Bninswiok Natural History So- 
ciety, Bulletin, Na 5. 
New genus of SiluriaD fishes, Mat- 
thew. 

NinVELL, F. H. RichmoDd coal-field, 
VirgiDia. 

G-eol. Magasine, decade iil, vol. 6, pp. 188- 
139. 1880. 

Review of W. Clifford. " Richmond coal- 
field, YiTginia." 1888. Diacnsses aome straot- 
vral and atratigraphic features. 

New Hampshire, conglomerates in 
gneisses, Hitchcock. 
fossils from Littleton, Dana, J. D. 

PUMPELLY. 

glaciation of monntains, Upham. 

New Jersey, age of Potomac formation. 
Ward. 

Archean, Britton. Cook. Raymond. 

Arohean plant from limestone of Sus- 
sex County, Britton. 

artesian wells, Cook. 

base levels in Trias and Archean, 
Davis, W. M. 

boring at Atlantic City, Woolman. 

Cretaceous and Quaternary in vicinity 
of New York, Britton. 

diatomaceous earth in Atlantic City 
wells, King. 

fossiliferous Cretaceous near Clemen- 
town, Woolman. 

geologic map. Cook. 

glacial and post-glacial drifts, Brit- 
ton. 

Green Pond Mountain group, Mer- 
rill, F. J. H. 

greensand marls, Cook. 

intrusive and extrusive traps of Con- 
necticut valley, Davis. W. M. 

Miocene moUusca, Hbilprin. 

map of vicinity of New York City, 
Martin. 

Montville serpentine, Merrill, G. P. 

porphyrite of northwestern New Jer- 
sey, Kemp. 

paleolithic man in America, Trenton 
gravels, McGee. 

relations of upper Cretaceous in east- 
em and southern United States, 
Hill, R. T. 

topographic map, Davis, W. M. 

three formations of the middle At- 
lantic slope, McGee. 



New Jersey— Continued. 

trap sheets and lavas of Newark sys- 
tem, Darton. 

Trenton gravels, Abbott. 

Trias, Cook. Nason. Britton. 
DJlrton. Davis, W. M. 

yellow gravel. Cook. Merrill. 
Britton. 

New Jersey, Ctoological Survey Re- 
port, 1886. 
Arohean, Brittok. Cook. 
Green Pond Mountain group, Mer- 
rill. 
Greensand marls, Cook. 
Mining, Cook. 
Surface geology. Cook. 
Triassic, Cook. 
Yellow gravel, Merrill. 

Report for 1887. 

Geologic surveys. Cook. 
Artesian wells. Cook. 



— Report for 1888. 

Trias, Cook. Nason. 
Artesian wells, Cook. 



Atlas sheets. 



Geological map of New Jersey, Cook. 

New Mexico, Andesite from San Mateo 
Mountain, analysis, Chatard. 
basalt from near Grant, analysis, 
Chatard. . 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

Mount Taylor and Zufli plateau^ Dut- 

TON. 

Mesozoic of New Mexico, Marcou. 
Mesozoic of northern New Mexico, 

Stevenson. 
natural coke from Purgatory Cafion, 

analysis, Riggs. 
obsidian, Iddings. 
original locality of gryphsea Pitcheri, 

Marcou. 
San Pedro copper mine, Herrick. 
Santa Rita copper mine, Wendt. 
Slaybach lode, Herrick. 
Tertiary, Cope. 
vertebrate fauna of Puerco epoch. 

Cope. 

New Orleans, Academy of Sciences, 
Papers, voL 1. 
Archean of Texas, Harrod. 

New York, age of Niagara River, Spen- 
cer, J. W. 



DARTOK.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



121 



Ne'w Tork'-Continned. 

Archean plant from limestone of Sus- 
sex Coanty, New Jersey. Rela- 
tions of limestone outliers, Brit- 
ton. • 

Attica sink holes, Clarkb. 

beaches on son them side of Long 
Island, BRY80N. 

boring on Staten Island, Britton. 

bowjder of Oriskany on Staten Island^ 
Gratacap. 

brief history of Taconic ideas, Dana, 
J. D. 

building stones, Hall, J. Smock. 

Calciferous fossils of LakeCbamplain, 
Whitfield. 

Cambrian trilobites from Poughkeep- 
sie, Newberry. 

camptonite dike, Washington County, 
Kemp and Marsteks. 

cement and gypsum in Buffalo Pohl- 

MAN. 

Colombia formation, McGee. 

contact metamorpbism in rocks ad- 
joining Cortlandt scries near Peeks- 
kill, Williams, G. H. 

Cortlandt rocks, Callaway. 
Harkbr. Williams, G. H. 

Cretaceous and Triassic outcrops, 
Staten Island, Britton. Hollick. 

Cretaceous near Grassmere station, 
Staten Island, Britton. 

crystalline rock region of southeast- 
ern New York, Smock. 

Deyonian and Silurian in well at 
Morrisville, Prosser. 

cutting at Croton Point, Waring. 

dikes of Hudson River Highlands, 
Kemp. 

diorite dike of Forest of Dean, Kemp. 

distinctiveness of New York Island 
and Highland gneisses, Britton. 
Martin. 

eccentricity theory of glacial cold 
(recession of Niagara Falls), Clay- 
pole. 

£ozoonal rock of Manhattan Island, 

Gratacap. 
^lls of rock at Niagara, Claypole. 

Kaunas of upper Deyonian, Genessee 
section, Williams, H. S. 

^auna of upper Taconic, Washington 
County, Walcott. 

^o^s in city of Quebec, Ford. 



NeTKT 7ork — Continued. 

fossil leaf, Arrochar station, Staten 
Island, Hollick. 

fossils of Staten Island drift, Grata- 
cap. 

fossils of ''Taconic" limestone, Co- 
lumbia County, DwiGHT. 

gabbros and diorites of Cortlandt 
series near Peekskill, Williams, 
G. a 

genetic history of crystalline rocks, 
Hunt. 

geology of Buffalo, Ashburner. 

geology of Manhattan Island, Kemp. 

geology of Long Island, Dana, J. D. 

geology of Staten Island, Britton. 

glaciation of mountains, Upham. 

great primordial quartzite. Winch- 
ell, N. H. 

great lake basins of St. Lawrence, 
Drummond. 

Hamilton of Chenango and Otsego 
counties, Prosser. 

Iroqnois beach, Spencer, J. W. 
'kersantite at Croton Landing, New- 

BERRT. 

leaf in sandstone in drift, Staten 
Island, Hollick. 

life-history of Niagara Falls, Pohl* 
man. 

lower Helderberg of Cayuga Lake, 
Williams, S. G. 

lower Paleozoic graptolites. Lap- 
worth. 

map of vicinity of New York City, 
Martin. 

minerals of Staten Island, Chamber- 
LIN, B. 

modified drift (Staten Island), Brit- 
ton. 

Mohawk valley, Beecher and Halu 
Hall. J. 

natnral gas, Ashburner. 

Niagara shales, RingubberOw 

norites of Cortlandt series, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 

ophiotite of Warren County, Mer- 
rill. 

Oneonta sandstone, Beecher and 
Hall. Hall, J. 

Ordovician and Cambrian in well 
near Utica, Walcott. 

original Chazy rocks, Brainerd and 
Seeley. 



RECORD OF OBOLOGT FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



123 

IT«w Tork— Cnnlinacd. 

origin of serpvntiiieB nBar Mew York 

City, Brittdk. Obatacap. 
overlap i>f Crcf-aDvoiu on Arehean on 

StatBu lalautl («aaterii limit of Jnm- 

Trias), Newbeiiky 
petroknm aad nalar&l gae, AsH- 

BURHEB. 

prehiitorio hearth nnder drift at 

Buffalo, Gilbert. 
prinniplee «f adveruiies of the Ta- 

oiiuii:, Mabcou. 
leoent diacoTerles \a loeal CretaceooB 

aod Qaateniuy geolog;, Britton. 
rMient held work in Aroheao, Bsit- 

TON. 
report of State Oeologiat, Hau., J. 
rocks of Philadelphia and New York, 

BosetowD ext«naioa uf the Cortlandt 

flail, BiSHtii" Nbwberkv. Wtatt. 
St, Lnwtence baain and the Great 

Laktra, Sfeitcbu. 
BeacosBt Bwamps, 6hai.br. 
Berpeotiue of SyraoDM, Wiluams, 

O. H. 
Staten Islaiiil drifts, Britton. 
Blratigrapliic position of Olenellua, 

WaLCOTT 
Thcoiilci AyBtem, Daka, J. D. 

DWIGHT. MlLLBR. WALCOTT. 

Tacouio -qiieatiuu THatattid,HuNT. 
Tacooic of Geor;;ia and report on 
geologj- of Vermont, MaRCOU. 

Tacouio rooks and stratigraphf, 

Dana, J. D. 
Triaaaic ontcrops on Staten Island, 

Ho LUCK. 
Tall; limestonp, Wiluaus, S. G. 
types of Devonian system iu North 

Aoierica, Wiluamh, H. 8. 
Wappinget valley limestoneR, 

DWIQHT, 

veil at Staten Island, Hollick. 

well at Wuodbaveii, Long Island, 
Bkysijn- 

well on south aide LiOng Island, Bby- 
SON. 

well at Wood ham, Long Island, 
Lewis, E. 

Wiltiaaih's report on Devonian, Mar- 
co U. 

yellow gravel, Brttton'. 



iBt 



Nair Tork Academy of Soienoe, An* 
aala, vol. 4. 

Nortli American trilobitM, TOODIS. 

Trausactloiia, vol. 4. 

Uoivlderin Woodbridge, Connecticut, 

Hubbard. 
DapositsatGay Head, Masaaofausetts, 

Herkill. 
Salt of western New York, Newberry. 
Drifts of New Jersey and Staten Isl- 
and, BnlTTON. 
Fossil plants and rooks fro'm Wor- 
cester, UassaohDsetta, Kkhp. 

VOLS. - 

Minerals of Staten Island, Chauber- 

Orlgin of serpentines near Kew York, 

Britton. 
Western Virginia, North Carolina, 

and eastern Tennessee, Brttton. 

vol.6. 

Geology of Staten Island, BRITtON. 

E art hq mikes, Newserrt 

Gruon Pond Mountnlo group of New 

.IcrsBy, MEmuu., F J. H. 
Middle Camliriau trilobitea ftom near 

Poughkeepsio, Nbwbehrv. 
Fossil lishes and plants of the Trias 

of New Jersey and the Cooneotiont 

valley, Newberry. 

vol 7. 

" Taconio system " of Emmons, Nrw- 

Fossils in oity of Qaebeo, Ford. 

' ' Field of rocks " near Philadelphia, 

Martin. 
Geology at Great Barrington, Hassa- 

cbusetts, JVLIEN 

Boring on Statoii Island, Brittok. 

Overlap of Cretaceoua on Aichean on_ 
Staten Isluiid, NEWUKKnY 

Geology uf Mauhutlau Island, Kkhp- 

Distinction of New York gnuiss from 
rocks of iLoHigblauds, Martin 

Salt deposits of Petite Anse, Louisi- 
ana, Bolton. 

Origin of salt deposits, Nbwbkrrt. 

Salt deposilH in Kansas, Cox. 

Triosaic plants from Hondnraa, New- 
BKRRY. 

Geography and geology of Syria and 

Palestine, Post. 
Sub-Carboniferous at Sedalia, Mis- 

soari, Sampson, 



DARTOM.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



123 



NeTKT Tork Aoadeiiiy of Science, An- 
nals, voL 8~Continaed. 

Diatomaceons earth in wells at At- 
lantic City, New Jersey, King. 

Oil fields of Colorado and genesis of 
petroleum, Kbwbbrry. 

Silioified wood from California, 
Friedrich. 

Cretaceous near Gr%8sm<^re station, 
Staten Island, Britton. 

Rocks of Pennsylvania and New York, 
Rand. 

Crystalline rocks of New York-New 
Jersey region, Britton. 

Tin of North Carolina, Furman. 

Cambrian of North America, Wal- 

COTT. . 

Discoveries in local Cretaceous and 
Quaternary geology, Britton. 

ew Tork, Fifth Repoii: of the State 
Geologiat. 

Geology of Mohawk valley, Bsbcher 

and Hall. 
Oneonta sandstone, Bbbchrr and 

Hall. 
Salt wells, Bishop. 

ew Tork, Sixth Report of the State 
Oeologiat. 

Lower Helderberg of Cayuga Lake, 

Williams, S. G. 
Report, Hall, J. 
Sink holes at Attica, Clarkb. 
Tnlly limestone, Williams, S. G. 

3Vew Tork, Thirty-ninth Report of the 
State MuBetim of Natural History. 

Geologic reconnaissance in crystalline 
rook region, Smock. 

Report of State Geologist, Hall, J. 
Report on building stones. Hall, J. 
Spiral bivalve from Waverly of Penn- 
sylvania, Bebcher. 

iTew Zealand, copper mines, Henrich, 
siliceous sinters. Weed. 

^VlCHOLS, Edward. An aluminum ore 
[Floyd County, Georgia]. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
16, pp. 905-806^1 p. 1888. 



NICHOLS, Edward — Continued. 

Describes mode of ocoarreDce. Analysis. 

North Carolina, coal, Ashburnbr. 

coal from Stokes County, analysis, 
Whitfield, J. E. 

coal from Gulf, analysis, Clarke. 

Cranberry iron mine; Roap Moun- 
tain; French Broad, Britton. 

decomposed trap near Sanford, analy- 
sis, Chatard. 

deposits of phosphate of lime, Pen- 
rose. 

gneiss-dunyte contacts of Corundum 
Hill, Chatard. 

Hiawassee Valley, Colton. 

man in the Potomac valley, McGbe. 

mica mining, Phillipps. 

[peridotite], Clark. 

residue from decay of schists near 
Cary, analysis, RiOGS. 

round about Asheville, Willis. 

some norytes and gabbros, Herrick. 
Clarke and Denning. 

three formations of the middle Atlan- 
tic slope, McGee. 

tin, Furman. Van Ness. 

younger Mesozoic at Weldon, Ward. 

Nova Scotian Institute, Proc., voL 7, 
Geology of Aylesford, Kings County, 

HONEYMAN. 

Silurian collection of the Provincial 
Museum, Honetman. 

Carboniferous of Cape Breton, Gil- 
pin. 

Geology of Halifax and Colchester 
counties, Honeyman. 

Glacial geology of Nova Scotia, 
Honeyman. 

Nova Scotian superficial geology, 
Honeyman. 

Geologic recreation in Massachusetts 
Centre, Honeyman. 

Ice in the Carboniferous period, 

POOUE. 

Glacial bowlders of our fisheries, 

Honeyman. 
Geology of Cape Breton, minerals of 

the Carboniferous, Gilpin. 



124 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL.75L 



o. 



OCHSENnrS, Carl. On the formation 

of rock-salt beds and mother-liqaor 

salts. 

Philadelphia, Acad. Sci., Proc., 1888, part 
2, pp. 181-187. 

Mostly ohemioal. Befers to relationB of 
some salt deposits. 

Ohio, age of the Ohio gravel beds, 
Wright. 

ancient channel of Ohio at Cincin- 
nati, Jambs. 

6erea grit in northeastern Ohio, 
Gushing. 

Berea grit oil and gas, Okton. 

bowlders on terraces, White, I. C. 

cements, Lord. 

Clinton groap, Foerstb. 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

connection of coal-fields of Ohio val- 
ley, Shalbr. 
correlation of lower Silarian in Ohio 

valley, etc., Ulricu. 
Devonian plants, Newberry. 
diameter of Silurian Island about 

Cincinnati, Dennis. 
drift, Orton. 

drift in vicinity of Cincinnati, Burkb. 
gas well at Oxford, James. 
Geological Survey, report on oil and 

gas, Orton. 
geology of Cincinnati, Jambs. 
geology of Licking County, Hbrrick. 
geology of Ohio, in its relations to 

oil and gas, Orton. 
gypsum, Orton. 
Ivorydale well in Mill Creek valley, 

James. 
Lake age, Claypolb. 
lime, Orton. 

new horizons of gas and oil, Orton. 
Ohio shale oil and gas, Orton. 
Pittsburgh coal, Brown, C. N. 
Pomeroy and Federal Creek coal 

field, Lovejoy. 
physical history of Cincinnati rocks. 

Perry. 
section at Todd's fork, Foerstb. 
section of southwestern, James. 
sedimentation in Cincinnati group, 

James. 
sporocarps in Ohio shale, Orton. 



Ohio— Contlnned. 

subterranean commotion near Akron, 

Claypolb. 
Trenton limestone oil and gas, 

Orton. 
types of Devonian system in North 

America, Williams, H. S. 
Waverly group, Hbrrick. 

Ohio (geological Survey, Report, voL 
6, Economic Geology. 
Geology of Ohio in relation to petro- 
leum and gas, Orton. 
Origin of petroleum and gas, Orton. 
Trenton limestone as a source of oil 

and gas, Orton. 
Berea grit as a source of oil and gas, 

Orton. 
Ohio shales as a source of oil and gas, 

Orton. 
Pittsburgh coal in Jefierson, Belmont, 

and Guernsey counties. Brown, 

C.N. 
Pomeroy and Federal creeks coal 

field, Lovejoy. 
Natural and artificial cements, Lord. 
Gypsum in Ohio, Orton. 
Lime production in Ohio, Orton. 
; Drift deposits of Ohio, Orton. 
Supplemental report on new gas and 

oil-fields, Orton. 

Ohio Geological Survey, preliminary 
report on petroleum and gas, 
Orton. 

OLCOTT, £. £. Battle Mountain min- 
ing district. Eagle County, Colorado. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 43, pp. 418-419, 
436-437. 40. 1887. 
Description of geology o/the region. 

Oregon, Cascade Mountains, Cope. 

coal, ASHBURNBR. 

geology of western Oregon, Copb. 

DuTTON. Lang. 
faults of Great Basin and Sierra 

Nevada, Lb Contb. Bussbll, I. C. 
intermediate Pleistocene fauna,CoPB. 
nickel ores and peridotites, Clarke, 

F. W. Merrill, G. P. 
invertebrate fossils from Pacific 

Coast, White, C. A. 
obsidian, Iddings. 



DAATOK.] 



BECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889, 



125 



Oregon — Contin ued . 

snbmerged trees of the Colombia, 

Button. Emmons, S. F. 
aarface geology of eoathern Oregon, 

BiDDLE. 

transcontinental railways, Lang. 

ORR, Ellison. Brown hematite in Alla- 
makee Connty, Iowa. 

Am. Geolgist, voL 1, pp. 129-180. 1888. 
Incidentally refers to relations of the under- 
lying Trenton limestone. 

ORTON, Edward. Geological survey of 
Ohio. Preliminary report npon petro- 
leum and inflammable gas. Reprinted 
for the author with a supplement. 200 
pages; plates. Columbus, 1887. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 62-03. 
1888. 

This edition differs from the one described 
in the bibliography for 1886 by the addition of 
a supplement of 85 pages, and the replace- 
ment of the geologic map ot the State by a map 
of gas areas. Th is supplement inclades an an 
nonncement of the outcrop of Trenton lime- 
stone in Clermont County, and new evidence 
bearing on the characteristics, relations, and 
thickness ot the overlying formations up to the 
Ohio shale, absence of Oriskauy, and the na- 
ture, course, and relations of the Cincinnati 
uplift, and the surface of the Trenton. 

[ ] The Trenton limestone as an oil 

formation. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, p. 133, 1 p. 1888. 

Notice of the extent of the dolomitic mem> 
ben* in Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, and the 
confinement of oil and gas to this portion of 
the formation. 

The geology of Ohio, considered in 

its relations to petroleum and natural 
gas. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Economic 
Geology, pp. 1-59, map, pis. 1888. 

Abstract and review. Am. Geologist, vol. 
21, pp. 58-60. 1888. 

Abstracts, SciencOj vol. 12, p. 175, ^ col., 
1888 ; Geol. Magazine, 3d decade, vol. I, pp. 
84-86.1889. 

Description of formations from Trenton 
limestone to the upper barren coal measures, 
and the geologic structure of the State. Dis- 
cussion of stratigraphy, equivalency, history, 
and extent of the several formations, the na- 
ture, relations, and history of the Cincinnati 
uplift and other flexures, and the contour of 
the upper surface of the Trenton. 

The origin and accumulation of pe- 
troleum and natural gas. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco* 
jiomic Geology, pp. 60^100. 1888. 



ORTON, Edward — Continued. 

Review of theories. Discussion of the com- 
position and order of sequence of petroleum- ' 
bearing roi'.ks, effects of disturbances of strata, 
and pressure of the gas. ^ 

The Trenton limestone as a source of 

oil and gas in Ohio. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Geology, pp. 101-310, 2 maps. 1888. 

Relations in Ohio and elsewhere in general, 
composition, lithology. occirrenoe in wells, 
depth from surface at various localities, ex- 
tent, structure, range, and overlying forma- 
tion pierced in drilling. 

The Berea grit as a source of oil and 



gas in Ohio. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Geology, pp. 311-409, map, pis. 1888. 

Characteristics, stratigraphic relations, ex- 
tent, position, occurrence, structure, and re- 
lations in well holes. a 

— The Ohio shale as a source of oil and 
gas in Ohio. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Greology, pp. 410-442. 1888. 

Description of its stratigraphy, variations 
in thickness, extent, proportion of contained 
petroleum, structure, and occurrence in well 
holes. 

— Gypsum or land-plaster in Ohio. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Geology, pp. 696-702. 1888. 

Abstract, IT. S. Geol. Survey, lylineral Re- 
sources, 1887, pp. 596-601. 1888. 

Geologic horizon, mode of occurrence, and 
origin. 

— The nrbduction of lime in Ohio. 



Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Geology, pp. 703-771. 1888. 

Geological horizons of limestone beds. De- 
scription and analyses of limestones at various 
localities. Notice of glacial stri» on Kelley 's 
Island. 

- The drift deposits of Ohio. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Geology, pp. 772^782. 1888. 

Abstract, Science, vol. 12, p. 176, 8 lines. 
1888. 

Keference to " forest bed," and occurrences 
of gas and oil. Table of thicknesses, pp. 77&- 
782. 

— Supplemental report on the new gas 



fields and oil fields of Ohio. 

Ohio, Geol. Survey, Report, vol. 6, Eco- 
nomic Geology, pp. 783-792. 1888. 

Notices of depths at which Clinton and 
Trenton limestones were found, and indication 
of a well marked fold under Tiflin. 

— [Natural gas in Ohio.] 



126 



RECORD OF GEOLOQY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull 75. 



ORTON, Edward — CoDtinaed. 

XT. S. Geol. Surrey, Mineral Reeonrces, 
1887, pp. 479-482. 1888. 

Abetract, Am. Manniactorer, Natural gas 
Bupplement, 1886. 

The discovery of sporooarps in the 

Ohio shale. [Abstraot. ] 

Am. Ascoo. Adr. Science, Proc. , vol. 37, pp. 
179-181. 1889. 

lacidentally oonsidera conditions onder 
which the shales were deposited. 

The new horizons of oil and gas in 

the MissiBsippi valley. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., voL 87, pp. 
181-182. 1889. 

Includes references to equivalency, rela- 
tions, and area of some of the oil-bearing for- 
mations hr04iio^entncky, and Canada. 

OttSLVfrsL Naturalist, voL 1. 

Oeological horizon of Siphonotrela 

scotia. Ami. 
Ice age and sabseqnent formations, 

Ottawa, Ami. 
Ottawa clays and expansion of Gulf 

of St. Lawrence and Canadian 

lakes, Bowman. 
Utica fossils from Ridean, Ontario, 

Ami. 



OtttxwsL Naturalist, voL 1 — Continued. 
Chazy formation at Aylmer, Quebec, 

LOWTBR. 

''Phospbatio nodules" in Chazy at 
Ottawa, Ami. 

G^logic relations along the Ottawa, 
Ami. 

Geologic features, government farm 
near Ottawa, Ami. 

Sequence of formations about Ot- 
tawa, Ami. 

OWEN, J. Notes on the geology of the 
Rio Grande valley. 

Geol. and Sci. Bull., voL 1, Feb., 1888, f 
col. 40. 

Beference to Cretaceous coal-bearing series, 
and suggestion as to their equivalency. Drift 
hypothesis of their origin. 



-[Report.] 

Texas, Grcol. and Mineralogical Bmnifij, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 69-74. 1889. 

Abstract, G^ol. and Sci., Bull., vol. 1, Nov., 
1888. 1 col. 

Geologic notes on Yal Yerde, Kinney, 
Uvalde, Zavala, Webb, Dimmit, and Maver- 
ick counties mainly regarding the Cretaceous. 
Calls attention to occuirenoee of volcanic 
rooks in Uvalde County. 



P. 



PACKARD, Alphens S. Notes on the 
physical geography of Labrador. 

Am. Geogr. Soc., Bull., vol. 19, pp. 403-422, 
map. 1887. 

Contains some incidental references to geol- 
ogy, glacial lake basins, glaciation, and origin 
of fiords. 

A summer's cruise to northern 

Labrador. 

Am. G-eogr. Soc, Bull., vol. 20, pp. 337-363, 
445-463, map, pis. 1888. 

Incidental references to occurrences of Ar- 
chean, Cambrian, and Quaternary and ter- 
races, and description of the relations of the 
basalts and terraces of Henley and Castle 
islands. 

Recent discoveries in the Carbonif- 
erous flora and fauna of Rhode Island. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, p. 411, | p. 
18ti9. 

Contains incidental reference to strati- 
graphic position of the Bhode Island series. 

PAGE, William N. The Glen more iron 
estate, Greenbrier County, West Vir- 
ginia. 



PAGE, William N.— Continued. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., voL 
17, pp. U5-124. 1889. 

G^logic notes and sections of a tract a few 
miles north of the White Sulphur Springs. 

PANTON, J. Hoyes. Places of geolog- 
ical interest on the banks of the Sas- 
katchewan. 

British Assoc. Adv. Science, Report, 1887, 
pp. 714-715. 1888. 

Reference to coal beds and other members 
of Belly River series near Medicine Flat and 
near Irviug Station. Gives table suggesting 
equivalency of the members of the Cretaceous 
in the northwest territory of Canada with 
those of the Missouri region and western 
Europe. 

Places of geological interest near 

Medicine Flat. 

Canadian Inst., Proc., 8d series, voL 5^ pp. 
150-162. 1888. 

Sections of coal-bearing series near Medi- 
cine Flat and of exi>oRures in Irving ravine, 
and reference to their stratigraphlc positions. 

PARKER, Richard A. The new Michi- 
gan gold fields. 



o».w«..\ BaCOKD OF OKOLOQY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



127 



Sng. and Mining Jow., y<rf 46, pp. 238-239. 
40. ' 1888. 

Brief description of geologic relftUons, and 
cross-section. 

PECHIN, £. C. The iron ores at Baena 
Vista, Rockbridj^e County, Viiginia. 

Eng. and BCining Jour., yoL 48, pp. 92-93. 
40. 1889. 

Inclndes brief citations and oroes-seotion 
fh>ni geologic reports by J. L. and F. D. 
Campbell. 

Pennsylvania, age of Philadelphia 
gravel, Wright. 

anthracite region, Hill,'F. A. 

antecedents of man in the Potomac 
Talley, McGse. 

Appalachian stmotare, Maroabie. 

Archbald pot-hole, Ashburnbr. 

a river pirate, Davis, W. M. 

Bernioe anthracite basin, Claghorn. 

Cambria County, Fulton. Prosbbr. 
Hardbn. 

coal section at Wellersburgh, Somerset 
County, Lesley. 

coal, Ashburnbr. 

coal mining at Irwin, Humphreys. 

Columbia formation, McGee. 

cross-section of crest of the Alleghany 
Mountain, Fulton. 

Cumberland-Lebanon Valley, d'In- 
villibrs. 

dictionary of fossils, Lesley. 

early man in Delaware Valley, Cbes- 
son. 

faunae of upper Devonian, Wil- 
liams, H. S. 

four great sandstones, Claypole. 

"Field of rocks" west of Philadel- 
phia, Martin. 

glacial strisB in Wyoming- Lacka- 
wanna region, Branner. 

glaciation ; its relations to the Lack- 
awanna-Wyoming region, Bran- 

NBR. 

head of Chesapeake Bay, McGbb. 
Lehigh River section. Hill, F. A. 

WiNSLOW. 

lower Carboniferous, Stevenson. 

materials of the Appalachians, Clay- 
pole. 

natural gas, Carll. 

northern coal-field. Hill, F. A. 

oil and gas, Carll. 

petroleum and gas in New York, Ash- 
burnbr. 



Pennsylvania— Coo^/miac/. 

Pittsburgh «oal bed and its disturb- 
ances, Wasmuth. 

Pittsburgh coal region, d'Invilliers. 

pyrite in bituminous coal. Brown, 
A. P. 

Radnor township, Delaware County, 
Band. 

rivers and valleys, Davis, W. M. 

rocks of Philadelphia and New York, 
Rand. 

Somerset County, Fulton. Lesley. 
Prosser. 

slate quarries, Merrill, 6. H. 

southern anthracite coal field and its 
'disturbances, Wasmuth. 

State line serpentines, Chester. 

stratification and structure in anthra- 
cite, Wasmuth. 

structural geology of Carboniferous, 
Wasmuth. 

three formations of the middle Atlan- 
tic slope, McGeb. 

Trenton gravels, Abbott. 

terraces and bowlders of southwest- 
ern Pennsylvania, White, C. A. 

types of Devonian system in North 
America, Williams, H. S. 

Waverly group, Bebcher. 

waterfalls, base-levels, Davis, W. M. 

Pennsylvania Geological Survey, Re- 
port for 1886. 

Geologic map of southwest Pennsyl- 
vania, d'Invilubrs. 

Mining methods of Westmoreland 
Coal Company, Humphreys. 

Oil and gas region, Carll. 

Paleozoic plants, Lbsquereux. 

Pittsburgh coal region, d'Invilliers, 

Report on anthracite region. Hill, 
F. A. 

Lehigh River cross section, Wins- 
low. Hill, F. A. 

Metallic paint along Lehigh River, 
Hill, F. A. 

Iron mines and limestone quarries, 
Cumberland-Lebanon valley, d'In- 

VILLIERS. 

Geology of Radnor township, Dela- 
ware County, Rand. 

Atlas AA. 

Eastern -middle anthracite field, Hill. 

F.A. 
Northern anthracite fiold, Hill, F. A. 
Southern anthracite field. Hill, F. A. 



128 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 76. 



Pennsylvania Qeologioal Survey, Re- 
port for 1886~CoDtiDued. 
Dictionary of fossils of Pennsylvania, 
Lesley. 

Atlas to Reports HH and HHH. 



Map of Cambria County, Fulton. 

Map of Somerset County, Fulton. 

Columnar section of coal measures of 
Cambria County, Fulton. 

Cross-section through crest of Alle- 
ghany Mountain, Fulton. 

Coal section at Wellersbnrg, Lesley. 

Cambria County, notes, Fulton. 

New mines, Cambria County, Pros- 
8BR and Harden. 

New mioes, Somerset County/'PROS- 

SER. 

PENROSE, R. A. F., jr. Nature and 
origin of deposits of phosphate of lime, 
with an introduction by N. S. Shaler. 
XJ. S. Greol. Snnrey, Bull., vol.7, pp. 475- 
617, pla. Mil, No. 46. 1888. 

Inclades descriptions of the ooonrrence and 
geologic relations of the apatite deposits of 
Canada and of the phosphates of South Caro< 
Una, North Carolina, Alabama, Martha's 
Yinoyard, and Florida. Also descriptions of 
European deposits from various authorities. 

Report of geologist for eastern Texas. 

Texas, G-ecl. and Mineralogical Snnrey, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 54-60. 1889. 

Abstract, Geol. and Sci., Bull., vol. 1* 
March, 1889, i col. ; Jan., 1889, ^ col. 

An account of the Tertiary iron ores and 
lignites in Marion, (]^s, Smith, Cherokee, and 
Van Zandt counties. 

Notes on certain building stoues of 

east Texas. 

Geol. and Sci., Bull., vol 1, March, 1889, f 
col., 4°. 

Science,voL 13, p. 295, | col. 1889. 

If otice of several sandstones and referenc® 
to their stratigraphic positions. 

See HILL, Robert T., aud. Upper- 
most Cretaceous beds of the eastern 
and southern United States. 

Peoria Scientific Association, Bulle- 
tin, vol. 1. 
Geology of Peoria County, Chap- 
man. 

PERRY, Nelson W. The Cinciunati 
rocks: What has been their physical 

history ? 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 326-336, 2 plates. 
1888. 

Abstract, Am. Jour. Sci. , 3d series, vol.39, 
p. 70, ip. 1890. 

Discussion of conditions of deposition . 



Petrography. 

Alaska, ore of Tread well mine, Adams. 
Arizona, primary quartz in basalt, Id- 
dings. 
felsite porphyry, Wendt. 

ArkansiM, Pike County peridotite, 

Brackett. 
Califarniaf building stones, Jackson. 

California rocks, petrographic notes, 
Schuster. 

lithology of wail rocks, Attwood. 

Mono County, Whiting. 

Obsidian, Iddings. 

primary quartfe in basalt, Iddings. 

quartz basalt, Diller. 

quicksilver regions, Becker. 

texture of massive rocks, Becker. 

Canada, diabase dikes of Rainy Lakes, 
Lawson. 

drift of central Ontario, Coleman. 

gneiss bowlder in Halifax coal, 
Spencer. James. 

Huronian near Sudbury, Bonney. 

Michipiciton Bay, Herrick. Tight 
and Jones. ' 

original Huronian region, Winchell, 
A. Winchell, N. H. 

region west of Lake Superior, Law- 
son. 

rocks containing scapolite, Adams 
and Lawson. 

Classification, synopsis of Rosenbnsch's 
new scheme, Bayley. 

Colorado, eruptive rocks from Custer 
County, Cross. 

erupt! ves of Leadville region. Cross. 

paramorphic origin of certain min- 
erals. Cross. 

phonolite, Cross. 

primary quartz in basalt, Iddings. 

rocks of Leadville region, analyses, 
Hildebrand. 

Connecticut, traps of Connecticut val- 
ley, Davis and Whittle. 

Hawaiian Islands, Dana, E. S. 

Kentucky, peridotite of Elliott County, 
Diller. 

Maine, enlargement of augites in peri- 
do tites from Little Deer Island, 
Merrill, G. H. 

Maryland, mineralogy of Maryland, 
Williams, G. H. 
Baltimore gabbros, Williams, G. H. 



DABTOX.] 



BECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



129 



Petrography — Con tinned . 
Maryland — Continued, 
paragenesis of allonite and epidote, 

HOBBS. 

rocks near IlcheBter, Hobbs. 

MassachuetUf dike of diabase in Bos- 
ton basin, Hobbs. 
Essex region, Seabs. 

Mickigan, metamorphism of emptives 
on south shore of Lake Superior, 
WlLUAMSy G. H. 
northwestern, Winchell, A. Win- 
CHBLL, N. H. 

Minfi€90tay northeastern, Winchell, 

A. WlKCHELL, N. H. 

granites of the Northwest, Hall, 

C. W. 

northwestern Minnesota, Winchell, 

H. V. 
some norytes and gabbros, Herrick. 

Clabke and Dbming. 
spotted rocks from Pigeon Point, 

Bayley. 
Trenton limestone, Hall, C. W. 

Missotirif Archean geology, Ha worth. 

Nwadaj Obsidian, Iddings. 
primary quartz in basalt, Iddings. 
Steamboat Springs, Becker. 

New Jersey f porphyrite of northwestern, 
New Jersey, Kemp. 

texture of massive rocks, Becker. 

serpentines of Montville, Merrill, 
G.P. 
New York, Camptonite dike, Washing- 
ton County, Kemp and Marsters. 

contact metamorphism produced by 
Cortlandt series, Williams, G. H. 

Cortlandt rocks, Callaway. 
Harker. Williams, G. H. 

dikes of Hudson River Highlands 
Kemp. 

dioritc dike at Forest of Dean, Kemp. 

Eozoonal rock of Manhattan Inland, 
Gratacap. 

gabbros and diorites of the Cortlandt 
series, Williams, G. H. 

kersantite at Croton. Newberry. 

norytes of the Cortlandt series, Wil- 
liams, G. H. 

•Bosetown extension of the Cortlandt 
series, Kemp. 

serpentines of Staten Island, Grata- 
cap. Britton. 

serpentine of Syracuse, Williams, G.H. 

Bull. 75 9 



Petrography — Continued. 
North CaroUnat norytes and gabbros, 
Herrick. Cjlabxx and Dsming. 
peridotite, Clarke. 

Oregon, Nickel Mountain (peridotite), 
Clarke. Merrill, G. P. 

Pennsylvania^ serpentine of southeast- 
ern, Chester. 

Rhode Island, great dike at Paradise, 
Crosby and Barton. 

South America, Brazil, monazite in rocks, 
Derby. 
Fernando Nosonha, petrography, 

Gill. Williams, G. H. 
Peru, andesite, Cerro de Pasco, 

H6i>gbs. 

South Carolina, contact phenomena, 
Richards. 

Utah, Henry Mountain laccolites, 
Cross. 

Wieconein, enlargement of hornblende 
and augite. Van Hise. 

Wyoming, Obsidian cliff, Yellowstone 

Park, Iddings. 
lenciterock, Absaroka range, Hague. 
lithophyssB and lamination of acid 

lavas, Iddings. 

Philadelphia, Academy of Natural 
Sciences, Proceedings, 1887. 

Classification of post - Cretaceous, 
Heilprin. 

Artesian well at Atlantic City, Wool- 
man. 

Ages of rock deposits, Heilprin. 

Miocene mollusca of New Jersey, 
Heilprin. 



1888. 



Formation of rock-salt beds, OcH- 

SENIUS. 

Fauna of lower coal measures of 
central Iowa, Kbyes. 

— 1889. 



Sand dunes of Lewes, Delaware, 

ROTHROCK. 

Gasteropod from Burlington, Iowa, 
Keyes. 

PHILLIPS, W. B. Mica mining in 
North Carolina. 

Eng. and Mining Jour. , vol. 45, pp. 286, 306, 
307,322,324,382-383,398,418,436. A°. 1888. 

Elisha Mitchell Sci. Soc. Jonr., 1888, part 3, 
pp. 73-97. 1888. 



130 



RECORD OF QEOLOGT FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



rBULL.7& 



\, W. B. — Continued. 

Sci. Am., Snpt, vol. 26, p. 10149, No. 654 ; pp. 
10462-10483, No. 655; pp. 10474-10475, Ko. 656; 
folio. 1888. 

Incladee references to the geology to the age 
of the rocks. 

PHINNET, A. J. Henry County and 
portions of Randolph, Wayne, and 
Delaware. 

Indiana, Department of 'Geol. and Nat. 
Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 97-116. 1886. 

Describes an outcrop of Niagara, evidences 
of glacial lakes and river channels, thekames, 
osars, moraine, and bowlder tract. Discusses 
the origin and history of the various glacial 
phenomena. 

[Natural gas in Indiana.] 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources, 
1887, pp. 485-489. 1888. 

From? 

Includes a description and discussion of the 
relations of the Cincinnati arch in Indiana. 

FINKHAM, Henry M. The Lake 
Superior copper properties, pp. 102, 
map, Boston. 1889. 
Net seen. 

Pleistocene . 
Arizona^ Phoenix mine, RiCK^TTS. 
Arkansas, Pike County, Branner. 
Neozoic geology of southwestern 

Arkansas, Hill, R. T. 
Brazil^ Quaternary deposits and uplift, 

Mills. 
Sergjpe-Alag6as region, Branner. 
Calif orniay agriculture and late Qua- 
ternary geology, Hilgard. 
across tho Santa Barbara channel, 

Fewkes. 
California by counties, Irrlan. 
coast region, Le Conte. 
drift mining, Dunn. 
dry lakes, Jenney. 
fossils. Cooper. 
glaciation of eastern flanks of Sierra 

Nevada, Am. Geologist. 
Hanksite, Hanks. 
Inyo County, Goodyear. 
Kern County, Haggin. 
Lake Lahontan, Russell, I. C. 

Science. 
Los Angeles County, Goodyear. 
Mono County, Whiting. 
natural gas region, Weber. 
petroleum, asphaltum, and gas re- 

gions, Goodyear. 



Pleistocene — Con ti nnod . 
California — Continued. 

San Diego County, Goodyear. 
Hanks. 

San Bernardino County, Goodtear. 

Tolare County, Goodyear. 

Ventura County, Bowbrs. 
Canada, age of Niagara Riyer, Spencer, 
J. W. 

ancient shore line near Toronto, Iveh. 

another old channel of the Niagara, 
Scoveix. 

Antioosti shell marl, analysis, Adams. 

Arctic currents as factors in Canadian 
geology, Gaskino. 

Aicjba- wa-pish-kat and Albany rivers, 
Bell. 

Baffin land, Boas. 

British Columbia, glaciation, Bow- 
man. Dawson, G. M. 

changes of level of the Great Lakes, 
Gilbert. 

central plateau of northwest Canada, 
Tyrrell. 

continental glaciation, Dawson, J. 
W. Drummond. Richardson. 

distribution and geologic history of 
British North American plants, 
Drummond. 

drift north of Lake Superior, Spen- 
cer, J. W. 

geology of Mankato, Bechdolt. 
« glaciation of eastern Canada, Chal- 
mers. 

glaciation of high points in British 
Columbia, Dawson, G. M. 

Great Lake basins of Canada, DituM- 

MOND. 

glacial bowlders of our fisheries, 

HONBYMAN. 

glaciation of high points in British 
Columbia, Dawson, G. M. 

Hudson Bay, Bell. 

Labrador, cruise to northern, Pack- 
ard. 

Labrador, physical geography, Pack- 
ard. 

Labrador, Ungava district, Turner. 

Lake Winnipeg to Hudson Bay, Low. 

lecture on geology, Ells. 

life history of Niagara Fall8,PoHLMAN. 

Manitoba, piairies, Drummond. 

Manitoba, ^orings, Dawson, G. M. 

Manitoba, Winnipeg district, Mc- 
Charles. 



SABTOir.J 



RBCOBD OF QEOLOGT FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



131 



PleiBtooene— Continued. 
Canada — Continned. 

Manitoba, Bed Biyer Valley, Mc- 
Chabuks. 

Medicine Hat, Panton. 

New Brunswick and Qnebec, Chal- 
mRS. 

New Branswiok, Bailxt and Mc- 
INNBS. Chalmers. 

North of Vermilion Lake, British 
Columbia, Comstock. 

northem Alberta, Ttrbkll. 

northern part of the Dominion of 
Canada, 0AWBOir, G. M. 

Nova Scotia, Ayleeford, Honbtman. 

NovaSooti% glacial geology, Honey- 
man. 

Noya Scotia, Guysborough, Antigo- 
nish, and Pioton, Fletcher. 

Nova Scotian superficial geology, 
Hoketmak. . 

old shore lines in the Ontario basin, 
Gilbert. 

origin of some features in Canada, 
Bell. 

Ottawa clays and gravels. Bowman. 

Ottawa, Tioikiity of government £eurm, 
Aml 

Ottawa region, Ami. 

Ontario, petrography of drift of cen- 
tral, Coleman. 

Ontario, Brantford landslide, Spen- 
cer, J. W. 

Ontario, petroleum field, Bell. 

Pacific coast, Wright. 

Pleistocene at Bivi^re Beaudette, 
Dawson, J. W. 

portions of eastern townships. Ells. 

relations of Canadian to European 
geology, Dawson, J. W. 

Bttssell and Cambridge, Ontario, 
Craio. 

St. Lawrence basin and the Great 
Lakes, Spencer. 

Selkirk range, British Columbia, 
Green. 

the Iroquois beach, Spencer. 

Vancouver Island, Dawson, G. M. 

western Ontario, Winchell, A. 

WiNCHELL, N. H. 

Cenk-al America^ Nicaragua, Brinton. 

Honduras, Nason. 
CoUraAOf Aspen, Brunton. Emmons, 
S. F. Lakes. 

Cimarron landslide, Cross. 

Denver basin, Cannon, Cross. 



Pleistocene— Continned. 
Colorado — Continued. 

field for research in Bocky Mountains, 
Hills. 

glaciers in the Bocky Mountains, 
Emmons, S. F. 

infusorial earth in Denver, Headden. 

Leadville region, Emmons, S. F. 

Ouray County, Kedzie. 

Trinidad coal region, Lakes. 
ConneotUmty great bowlder at Wood- 
bridge, Hubbard. 

topographic development of Connec- 
ticut valley, Davis, W. M. 
Dakota, beaches and deltas of Lake 
Agassis, Upham. 

Black Hills, Carpenter. Crosby. 

continuance of Lake Cheyenne, 
Todd. 

fossil plants and origin of prairies, 
Lbibero. 

glacial boundary in southeastern 
Dakota, Wright. 

glacial geology, Chamberlin, T. C. 

terraces of the Missouri, Todd. 
Europe, terminal moraines in North 
Germany, Salisbury. 

Irish Esker drift, Kinahan. 
Florida, Dall. Heilprin. Kost. 
Idaho, glacial geology, Chamberlin. 

deep well at Nam pa, Wright. 
IllinoU, driftless area, Chamberlin, 
T. C. Chamberlin and Salisbury. 

forest bed beneath intra-morainic 
drift, Leverett. 

-glacial phenomena in northeastern 
Illinois, Leterett. 

loess and clay analyses, RiGGS. 

Peoria County, Chapman. 

raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Leverett. 
Indiana, erosion, l&ovell. 

glacial phenomena in northern Indi- 
ana, Leverett. 

implement in drift, Cresson. 

origin of loess, Campbell. 

geologic report, Brown. Gorby and 
Lee. Phinney. Thompson, M. 
Thompson, W. H., and Lee. 
lotca, Johnson County, Keyes. 

driftless area, Chamberlin and 
Salisbury. 

glacial geology, Chamberlin, T. C. 

glacial flow, Webster. 

loess and clays, analyses, RiGGS. 



132 



BECOBD OF 0£OLOGT FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 76. 



PleiBtooene—Coniiniied. 
Joira— Continned. 
floatheastem lowa^ Gordon. 
Buperficial deposits of northeastern 

Iowa, McGkb. 
surface geology of Barlington, 



topographic^ types in northeastern 
Iowa, McGbb. 

well at Daveoport, Tiffamt. 
Kansaa, southeastern, St. John. 
Kentuekyf Jackson porohase legion, 

LOUGHRIDOB. 

terminal moraine near Lonlsvillei 

Brtson. 
Mason County, Linney. 
western Kentucky, Proctob. 
Louisiana, iron region of northern, 

Johnson. 
Maine, analysis of clay from Farming- 

tOO, BOBINSON. 

glaciation in mouutains, Upham. 
Mount Desert region, Shalbr. 
osar, gravels and moraines, Cham- 

BRRLIN, T. C. 

termiual moraines, Stone. 
Maryland, associated with Albirupean 
formation, Uhlbr. 

antecedents of man in the Potomac 
valley, McGbb. 

Columbia formation, McGbb. 

head of Chesapeake Bay, McGbb. 

infusorial earth. Day. 

southern counties, Clarkb. 

three formations of the middle Atlan- 
tic slope, McGeb. 
Masaaehuaetu, Bristol County, Shalbr. 

Connecticut glacial lake, Emerson. 

Cohasset pot holes, Bouv^. UPirAM. 

Essex region, geologic notes, Sears. 

Gay Head, Merrill, F. J. H. 

geological recreation in Massachu- 
setts centre, Honbyman. 

Hampshire County, Emerson. 

Martha's Vineyaird, ShalBR. 

Nahant, Lane. 

Nantucket, Shalbr. 

old beaches near Boston, Davis, W. M. 

outer islands of Boston Harbor, 
Crosby. 

report on glacial geology, Chamber- 
LIN, T. C. 

shells in till near Boston, Upham. 

strnctnro of drumlins, Upham. 

swamps of New England, Shalbr. 



Pleistocene — Continued . 
Mexico, drainage of the vaUey of Mex- 
ico, Cbism. 
geology of Biga California, Lind- 

GRBN. 

Michigan, lake beaches of Ann Arbor, 

WooLBRmoB. 
northwestern Michigan, Winchell, 

N. H. 
poet glacial geology of Ann Arbor, 

WOOLBRIDOB. 

raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Lbybbbtt. 

river lake system oT western Michi- 
gan, Woolbridgb. 

Minnesota, driftless area, Chambbrlin 
and Salisbury. 

falls of the Mississippi, Kbyes, J. A. 

geology of Minnesota, Winchell, 
N. H. 

geologic conditions for artesian wells, 
Hall,C. W. 

geology of (central) counties, Upham. 

glacial moraines Minnsota, Upham. 

ice currents in eastern Minnesota, 
Upham. 

maps of Minnesota, Upham. 

northern Minnesota, Winchell, A. 

Minneapolis and St. Paul, Hall,C. W. 

northeastern Minnesota, Winchell, 
N. H. 

northwestern Minnesota, Winchell, 
H. V. 

recession of ice sheet, Upham. 

Stillwater deep well, Mrades. 

Vermilion Lake region, Winchell, 
N. H. 

Wabasha, Goodhue, Dakota, Henne- 
pin, Ramsey, and Washington 
counties, Winchbll, N. H. 

Mississippi, loess and clays, analyses, 

ElGGS. 

Missouri, glacial geology, report, Cham- 
bbrlin, T. C. 

loess and clay, analyses, RiGGS. 

hummocks and bowlders of decompo- 
sition, Spencer, J. W. 

Macon County, McGbb. 

sand bowlders in drift, Spencer, 
J. W. 

Montana, Gallatin region, Hayden. 
glacial geology, Chambbrlin, T. C. 
volcanic ash, Mbrrill, G. P. 
volcanic ash; analysis, Clarke, F. W, 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



133 



Pleistocene — Continued. 
NebraaJca, clay from Pine and Cherry 

counties, Rbkd. 
oontinnance of Lake Cheyenne, Todd. 
diatomaoeons earth, Hicks. 
foasil bone in well at Lincolo, Am. 

Gkolooist. 
geyserite, Hicks. 

glacial geology, Chamberlin, T. C. 
green quartzite, Todd. 
marl from Cheyenne County, Am. 

Geologist. 
peat bed in Loup County, Russell, 

F.W. 
soils, HiCK«. 

terraces of the Missouri, Todd. 
volcanic ash, Merrill, G. P. 
volcanic dust. Hicks. 
volcanic dust, analysi8,CLARKE, F.W. 
well at Lincoln, Russell, F. W. 
well in Pawnee County, RusselL, 

F.W. 

Nevada, age of Eqnus beds. Cope. 
dry lakes, Jbnney. 
Lake Lahontan, Russell, I. C. Sci- 

BXCE. 

New Hampshire, glaciation of moun- 
tains, Upham. 

New Jer$ey, base levels in Trias and Ar- 

chean, Davis, W. M. 
boring at Atlantic City, Woolman. 
Columbia formation, McGee. 
geologic map, Cook. 
map of vicinity of New York city, 

Martin. 
Paleolithic man in America, Trenton 

region, MgGee. 
Trenton gravels, Abbott. 
wells, artesian. Cook. 
yellow gravels. Cook. Merrill, F. 

J. H. Brttton. 

NewTork, changes of level of the Great 

Lakes, Gilbert. 
cutting at Croton Point, Warring. 
&lls of rock at Niagara, Claypole. 
glaciation of mountains, Upham. 
Great Lake basins of St. Lawrence, 

Drummond. 
Iroquois beach, Spencer, J. W. 
life-history of Niagara Falls, Pohl- 

man. 
Long Island, /beaches on sonthern 

side, Bryson. 
Long Island, geology, Dana, J. D. 



Pleistocene — Continued. 
New York — Continued. 

Long Island, well hole on south side, 
Bryson. 
' Long Island, Woodhamwe11,LEWis,E. 

Long Island, Woodhaven well, Bry- 
son. 

Manhattan Island, Kemp. 

map of vicinity of New York city, 
MariPN. 

prehistoric hearth in western New 
York, Gilbert. 

St. Lawrence basin and the Great 
Lakes, Spencer, J. W. 

sink holes at Attica, Clarke. 

Staten Island well borings, Britton. 

Staten Island, Oriskany bowlder, 
Gratacap. 

Staten Island drifts, Britton. 

Staten Island drift, fossils, Gratacap. 

Staten Island, leaf in sandstone in 
drift, HoLLiCK. 

Staten Island, modified drift;, Brit- 
ton. 

yellow gravel, Britton. 

. 

Nomenclature, Hilgard. Newberry. 
Whitfield. Winchbll, A. 

report of subcommittee of Interna- 
tional Congress, Hitchcock. 

report on Cenozoic, Cook. 

Ohio, age of gravel beds, Wright. 
ancient channel of the Ohio at Cin- 

cinati, James. 
bowlders along Appalachian rivers. 

White, I. C. 
drift, Orton. 
drift in the vicinity of Cincinnati, 

Burke. 
geology of Cincinnati, James. 
Ivorydale well, James. 
lake age, Claypole. 
southwest Ohio, James. 
subterranean commotion near Akron, 

Claypole. 
well records, Orton. 

Oregon, infusorial earth. Day. 
Lake Lahontan, Russell, I. C. 

Science. 
surface geology of southern Oregon, 

BiDDLE. 

western, Lang. 

Pennsylvania, age of Philadelphia red 
gravel, Wright. 
anthracite regions, Hill, F. A. 



134 



BECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



Flei8tocene--Conti naed. 
Pennsylvania — Continaed. 

a river pirate, Davis, W. M. 

bowlders along Appalachian riyers. 
White, I. C. 

Columbia formation, McGkx. 

" field of rocks '' west of Philadel- 
phia, Martin. 

earl; man in the Delaware valley, 
Crxsson. 

glacial strisB in Wyomfbg-Lacka- 
wanna region, Brannbr. 

Lehigh river section, Hill, F. A. 

potholes at Arehbald, Dana, J. D. 

Radnor township, Delaware Coanty, 
Rand. 

rivers and valleys, Davis, W. M. 

waterfalls— base levels, Davis, W. M. 

Snsqnehanna valley, Bashore. 

Rhode Island, bowlder train, Chamber- 
lin, T. C. Sualbk. 
geology of Rhode. Island, Provi- 
dence Franklin Society. 

Texas, driffc at Gainsville, Ragsdale. 
geology of Texas, ^ILL, R. T. 
Haldeman Connty, J. T. W. 
iron region of eastern Texas, John- 
son. 
Rio Grande valley, Owen. 
story of Colorado River, Hill, R. T. 
western Texas, Hill, R. T. 

Vermont, Camel's Hump and Lincoln 
Monntain, Upham. 
glaciation of mountains, Upham. 

Virginia, Colnmbia formation, McGee. 

Oriskany drift near Washington, 

Curtice. 
southwest Virginia, Stevenson. 

Washington, Puget Sound region, 
Wright. 

West Virginia, bowlders along Appa- 
lachian rivers. White, I. C. 

Wisconsin, driftless area, Chamberlin, 
T. C. Chamberun and Salisbury. 

falls of the Mississippi, Keyes, J. A. 

glacial geology, Chamberlin, T. C. 

loess and clays, analyses, Riggs. 

raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Leverett. 

Wyoming, geologic history of Yellow- 
stone Park, Hague. 
report of Territorial Geologist, RiCK- 
etts. 



Pleistocene — Continued. 

Unclassified, antiquity of man, Am. 

Geologist. 
change^ of level of the Great Lakes, 

Gilbert. 
distribution of certain loess fossils, 

Kbtes, C. R. 
eccentricity theory of glacial cold, 

Clatpole. 
effects of pressure of a continental 

glaoieri Winchbu^ A. 
extra-moraiuio lakes and clays, 

Lewis. H. C, 
fence-wall geology, Fobrste. 
glaciers and glacial radients in the 

ice age, Claypolb. 
glacial origin of cliffii, Davis, Wm. 
Hoist's studies iu glacial geology, 

LiNDAHL. 

H. C. Lewis and his work in glacial 

geology, Upham. 
ice age in North Americi^ Wright. 

Davis, W. M. 
ice phenomena, Qibll. 
interior North America, Copb. 
on the manner of deposit of glacial 

drift, Hay, R. 
origin of loess, Newberry. 
reports, division of glacial geology, 

(J. S. Geological Survey, Chamber- 

LIN, T. C. 
rock scorings of the great ice inva- 
sion, Chamberun, T. C. 
swamps of New England, Shalbr. 
terraces of the great American lakes, 

Kinahan. 
the ice age in North America, 

Wright. 
three formations of Middle Atlantic 

slope, McGeb. 
warping of earth's crust and origin 

of lake basins, Spbncer, J. W. 

POHLMAN, Julius. Cement rock and 
gypsum deposits in Buffalo. 

Am. Init. Mining Bngineen, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 250-258. 1889. 

Statemeots in regard to gecdogio horison of 
the deposits, and record of 725>foot boring 
through upper Silurian limestones. 

The life-history of Niagara. 

Am. Inat. Mining Engineers, Trana., toI, 
17, pp. 322-338. 1889. 

Abstract, Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 46, 
282-283, § col. 4°. 1888.^ 

A general discussion of the relatioBs and 



DARTOX.l 



RECORD O^ GEOLOGY I^OR 1887 tO 1889. 



135 



POHLMAN, Jalius — Continuetl. 

history of the drainage and topography of the 
Niftgara River region. 

POMEROT, Riohard A. The Petite 
Anse Bait mine. 

Eng. and Mining Joar., vol. 46, pp. 280-281. 
4P, 1888. 

Sci. Am. Sapt., vol 26, pp. 10719-10720, No. 
671. FoUo. 1888. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
17, pp. 107-113. 1889. 

Inclades a hrief reference to the geologic 
relations ; gives Hilgard's section^ 

POND, Edward J. A Cretaceoas river- 
bed. 

Science, voL 9, pp. 536-537. 18S7. 

Describes and figures the section at San 
Marcos, Texas, in which intra-Cretaceous un- 
conformity is indicated by a supposed ancient 
river-bed. Discusses history of some associa- 
ted drainage features. 

POOLE, Heory S. Ice in the Carbonif- 
eroas period. 

Nova Scotian Inst., Froc, vol. 7, pp. 202- 
204. 1889. 

An aoeoont of pebbles in the coal measures 
x>f ' Cape Breton, and discpssion of their 
origin. 

Popular Science Monthly, voL 31. 
Falls of the Mississippi, Keyes. 
Glacial lake and island of Cincinnati, 

Jambs. 
North American lakes, Kinley. 
Texture of massive rocks, Becker. 

vol. 33. 

Geological tourist in Europe, Lane. 
Paleolithic man in America. McGee. 

vol. 34. 



The name Silurian in geolo|;;y, Dana. 

POST, George £. The physical geogra- 
phy and geology of Syria and Pales- 
tine. 

New Tork Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 7, pp. 
ied-178. 1888. 

Description of the more prominent geologic 
features. 

POWELL, J. W^ Communication on 
the American Report of the Interna- 
tional Congress of Geologists. 

Am. Jour. Sei., 3d series, vol. 36, pp. 476a- 
476e. 1888. 

Call* attention to the misuse of his name in 
the repoirt of the American committee, dis- 
enaset tiie purpose of the convention, and 
glres an abstract of his report to the commit- 
tee on the Qnatemary. 



POWELL, J. \V.— Continued. 

[On the classification and nomen- 

clatnre of pre-Cambrian formations, 
and the work of the International Con- 
gress. ] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, pp.6oh-66. 

[ ] Prevention of floods in the lower 

Mississippi. 1888. 

Science, voL 12, pp. 85-87. 1888. 

Includes references to conditions affecting 
the transportation^nd dex)08ition of sediments 
in the Mississippi Biver and in general. 

Major Powell's Report— Operations 

of the National Survey — Yellowstone 
Park — Atlantic Coast work — Archean 
geology — Glacial geology — Appalach- 
ian geology — Classification of soils. 

Science, vol. 12, pp. 148-150. 1888. 
Abstract of report for 1887-'88 to the Secre- 
tary of the Interior. 

The laws of hydraulic degradation. 

Science, vol. 12, pp. 220-233. 1888. 
Read to National Academy of Sciences, 1888. 
Definition of conditions of transportation, 
corrasion, and deposition. 

PROCTOR, John R. Ken^ncky geolog- 
ical survey. Report of progress of the 
survey from January, 1884, to Jauaary, 
1886, 20 pages. Frankfort, 1886. 

Administrative and economic report. States 
snbdivlsions of formations in western part of 
the State. 

-: — Kentucky geological survey. Report 
on the progress of the survey for the 
years 1886 and 1887, 28 pages. Frank- 
fort, 1887. 

Describes the extent and character of some 
of the coal beds; calls attention to the occur- 
rence of Oriskany iron ores in the eastern 
part of the State ; reform to other ore bodies, 
and gives some general information in regard 
to the geology of the State and the geologic 
work of the survey. 

The mineral resources of Kentucky. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr. , vol. 4t, pp. 372-376. 
4°. 1887. 

Descriptions of the coal fields and iron ores. 
Geologic map, and cross-section of Kentucky. 

The mineral resources of Tennessee. 



Eng. and Mining Jonr., vol. 45, pp. 21-22. 
40. 1888. 

Reference to Oriakany and Clinton iron-ore 
beds in northeast Tennessee and southwest 
Virginia, brought up by Pine Mountain fault 
in Kentucky. 



136 



RECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bvlTm 75, 



PROSSER, A. G. Notes on the new 
mines of Somemet Coanty. 

PeniuiflTanUii O«ol. Simrvjr, atlas to re- 
porta HH and HHH, pp. 897-4M. 1889. 
SeotUma and dips at Tarkma openinga. 

and HARDBN, Oliver B. Notes on 

the new mines along the Pennsylvania 
railroad [Cambria Coanty]. 

PennsylTania, Oeol. Snnref, atlas to re. 
ports HH and HHH, pp. 3«0-396. 1880. 
Sections and dips at y^rioos openings. 

PROS8ER, Charles 8. Section of the 
lower Devonian and upper Silurian 
strata in central New York, as shown 
by a deep well at Morrisville. [Ab- 
stract.] 

Am. Assoc. AdT. Sci., Froc., vdL 36, pp. 
208-209. 1888. 

Colamnar section, and some snggestions in 
regard to horizon of some of the beds. 

The upper Hamilton' of Chenango 

and Otsego counties, New York. [Ab- 
stract.] 

Am. Assoc. AdT. Sci., Proc., yoL 36, p. 210. 
1888. 

Definition of stages between the Oneonta 
sandstone and the Hamilton, and discussion 



PROSSER, Charles S.— Continued, 
of the nature and equivalenoy of the Onaonta 
group. 

Providence Franklin Society. 

Beport on the geology of Rhode Island. 
130 pages, 3 plates. Providence, 
1887. 
Index of publications, pp. 2-57, 10(^114. 
Catalogue of rocks, minerals, and soils col- 
lected in 1839 hy C. T. Jackson. Catalogues 
of fossils and minerals. * ' List of localities of 
interest to geologists and mineralogists," evi- 
dence of glaciation, drifts, Purgatory con- 
glomerate. "Sesults obtained by digging and 
boring " in superficial deposits. Brief sketch 
of history of opiaions in regard to' the crystal- 
line and Carboniferous rocks of the state. 

PIJMPEUiT, Raphael. On the fossils 
of Littleton, New Hampshire. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 3d aeries, vol. 35^ pp. 79-^, 
fp. 1888. 
Discnssea their age. 

[On the classification, nomenclature, 

unconformities, eruptives, character- 
istics, life, and origin of some members 
of the pre-Cambrian formation and the 
origin of serpentine.] 

International Congress of G-eologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, p. 74, i p. ' 



R. 



RAOSDAIiE, G. H. Evidence of drift at 
Qainesville, Texas. 

Gteol. and Sci. Bull., vol. 1, Nov., 1888, | 
col. 4°. 

Statements in regard to relations and distri- 
bution of gravels of the region. 

RAND, Theodore D. Notes on the geol- 
ogy of Radnor township in Delaware 
Coanty, Pennsylvania, and of the town- 
ships adjacent. 

Fennsylvania, Report of G-eol. Survey, 
1886, part 4, pp. 1569-1618, plate, sheet 12 in 
atlas. 1887. 

Description of gneissic and granitic rockn, 
traps, hydromica schists, limestones, and 
serpentines, and discussion of their structural 
relations and relative ages. Beferenoe to oc- 
currence of Bryn Mawr gravels. 

A discassioD of the rocks of Penn- 
sylvania and New York. 

New York Acad. Science, Trans., vol. 8, 
pp. 47-52, plate. 1889. 

Description and section of the region west 
of Philadelphia, and discussion of structural 
and stratigraphic relations. 

RATH, G. vom. Einige bemerkongen 
iiber das territoriam Utah. 



RATH, G. vom— Continued. 

Bonn. Niederrhein G-esell., Sitzunsgber. 
(Separat abdruck), pp. 2iMW. [1887 ?] 
Not seen. 

Einige geologische wahmehmnngen 



in Mexiko. Bonn, 1887. 
Not seen. 

[RA7MOND, B. W.] Geological sur- 
vey of New Jersey. Annual report of 
the State geologist for the year 1886. 
Trenton, 1887, octavo, 254 pages. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., vol.43, p. 273. 4^. 
1887. 

Notice of contents and review of Britton on 
the subdivisions of the Archean and the ori* 
gin of its iron ores. 

[ ] The new geological map of Europe. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 43, p. 362. 4^. 

1887. 

United States geological survey mon- 
ographs, XII. Geology and mining in- 
dustry of Leadville, Colorado. With 
atlas. By Samuel Franklin Emmons. 
Washington, 1886. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 45, -pp. 249-250, 
339. 40. 1888. 



BABTOK.l 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



137 



RA7MOND, R. W.— Continued. 

Beview of theories of LeadvlUe oie fonna- 
tion. 

Note on a specimen of f^^iisonite from 



Uintah Connty, Utah. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Tranc., yoL 
17, pp. U3-116. 1889. 

Inelades an acconnt of its mode of occnr- 
renee. 

READE, T. Mellard. . Physical theories 

of the earth in relation to moontain 

formations. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3. pp. 106-111. 1889. 
Disoossion of some conditions affecting 
earth crost contraction and deformation. 

[REED, G. W.] [ Clay from Pine Creek, 
Cherry County, Nebraska.] 

Am. Geologist, yoL 1, p. 137, 4 lines. 1888. 
Notice of oocnrrence. 

R. O. Notes on the geology of Gaines 
County. 

Geol. and Sci. Bull., vol. 1, Jannary 1, 1889, 
§col. 40. 

Reference to oocnrrence of sandstone, *clay, 
and chalk of economic Yalne. 

Rhode Island, Report on Geology. 
Providence Franklin Society. 

Rhode Island [Bowlder trains], Cham- 

BERLIN. ShaLBR. 

Carhoniferons flora and fauna, Les- 
QUERBUX. Packard. 

coal, ASHBURNER. ShALER. 

conglomerates in gneisses, Hitch- 
cock. 

report on geology. Providence 
Franklin Society. 

RICHARDS, Gary F. Lithologic notes 
on contact phenomena in South Caro- 
lina. 

Denison University, Bull., vol. 4, pp. 5-10, 
pL15. 1888. 

Petxographic description of diabase gneiss, 
aotinolite schist, and granite from Spartan- 
burg County. Includes some incidental ref> 
erence to relations in the field. 

RICE(ARDSON, Ralph. On Canadian 
and Scottish glacial geology. 

Edinburgh G-eol. Soc., Trans., vol. 5, pp. 
205-212. 1887. 

Comparison of Scottish deposits with the 
Acadian Quaternary as described by Dawson ; 
statement of Dawson's views on the glacial 
theory, and a general sketch of the geology of 
the Northwest Territory after Dawson. 

RICKETTS, Louis D. Annual report 
of the Territorial Geologist to the Gov- 



RICKETTS, Louis D.— Continued, 
ernor of Wyoming, Jannary, 1888. 87 
pages. Cheyenne, 1888. 

Description of extent, occurrence, relations, 
and character .of Laramie coals ; general 
geologic relations in the Rattlesnake arid 
Shoshone petroleum and the Platte mining 
districts; the soda deposits, and a general 
sketch of the geology and geologic history of 
the State. 

[RICKETTS, P. de P.] Phcenix mine, 
Arizona. 

Eng. and Mining Jour. , voL 43, p. 309. 4<^. 
1887. 

Statement of geologic relations in its vicin- 
ity. 

RIGOR, Joseph. The Wyoming oil- 
fields. 

Sci. Am. Supt., voL 25, pp. 10404-10405, No. 
651, folio, 1888, from report on crude oils of 
Wyoming to the Omaha Petroleum Company. 

Includes brief general r^snmd of Wyoming 
geology from previous writers. 

RIOOS, B. 6. Residual deposit from 
subaerial decay of chloritio schist from 
eight miles west of Cary, North Caro^ 
Una. 

n. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 137, i p., 
Ko.42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Trenton limestone from Lexington, 

Virginia. 

U. S. G-eol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 137, i p., 
No. 42. 1887. 

Analyses of limestone and of the product of 
its subaerial decay. 

Ferruginous rock from Penokee iron 

range, Wisconsin. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 138, i p. 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Two rocks from Kakahikka falls, 

Kaministiquia Biver, Ontaria, Canada. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 7, p. 139, § p. 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analyses. 

Loess and clays. [Analyses.] 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., voL 7, pp. 142-144, 
No. 42. 1887. 

Kansas City, Missouri; Dubnqoe, Iowa; 
Galena, Illiuois; Yicksburg, Mississippi, 
and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Iron ores from Louisiana 



U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull. , vol. 7, pp. 144-145, 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analyses. 



138 



RECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOB T887 TO 188a 



[bull. 75. 



RIGO'S, B. B.— Continaed. 

*' Natural coke" from Midlothian, 

Virginia. 

U. S. Oeol. 8aiT«7, Boll. , vol. 7, p. 148, i p. 
No. 42. 1887. 
AnftlysiB. 

t — "Natural coke'' from Pargatory 

oa&on, New Mexico. 

U. S. Ckol. Svarejf Bull., toL 7, p. 147, | p. 
- No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

RINOUEBERO, Eagene N. B. The 
' Niagara shales of weetem New York; 

a study of the origin of the subdivision 

and their fannsB. 

Am. G-eologist, voL 1, pp. 264-272. 1888. 

Mainly paleontologio. Inolades a discus- 
sion of history of the fonnation and its rela- 
tion to the underlying formation. 

ROBINSON, F. C. Analysis of blue 
clay from Farmington, Maine. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d Mries, toL 34, pp. 407-408, 
ip. 1887. 

ROGERS, Wm. LnttrelU Tlie philoso- 
phy of glacier motion. 

Am. Geogr. Soc., Bull., voL20,pp. 481-501. 
1888. 

Incidentally refers to some of the results of 
glaoiation. 

r6MER, F. Ueber eine dnrch die Han- 
figkeit Hippuritenar tiger Chamideii 
ausgezeichnete Fauna der oberturonen 
Kreide von Texas. 

Kfinigiich prenssische Q«ol. Landesanstalt 
nnd Bergalcad. Pal. Ahhandlnng, Band 4, 
pp. 281. 

Not seen. 

ROMINGER, C. Description of primor- 
dial fossils from Mount Stephen, North- 
west Territory of Canada. 

Fliiladelpliia, Acad. Sci., Proc., 1887, pp. 
12-19, pi. 1. 1887. 

Brief statemoDt of the geologic relations at 
the locality. 

Rejoinder to Mr. C. D. Walcott [on 

primordial fossils from Mount Stephen, 
Canada]. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 356-359. 1888. 
Inclndes a description of the strata consti- 
tuting Mount Stephen. 

ROTHROCK, J. T. The sand dunes of 
Lewes, Delaware. 

Philadelphia, Acad. Sci., Proc, 1880, pp. 
134-135. 1889. 
Describes some phenomena of the dunes. 



ROWLEY*, R. R. The Chouteau group 
of eastern Missouri. 

Am. GUologist^ voL 3, pp. 111-116. 1889. 
Beferencea to its literature, stratigraphy, 
. dlstribation, and paleontfllogy. 

* 

RIJSSBZiXi, F. W. A. crystalline rock 
near the surface in Pawnee County, 
Nebraska. 

, Am. OeologUt,YoLl,'ppu 110-181,4 p. 1888. 
Notice of t{ie occurrence of a feldspathio 
rock in well pt, 662 feet, and reference to over 
lying beds. 

The salt well at Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Am. Gfreolociat,ToLl,p.l21,fp. 1868. 
Reference to roeka pierced in well 2,463 feet 
deep. 

[Peat bed in Loup County, Ne- 
braska. ] 

Am. aeologist, vol. 1, p. 137, i p. 1888. 
Beferi nee to extent, relation to underlying 
sands, and occurrence of diatoms. 

RIJl^SELL, I. C. Geological history of 
Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary lake of 
northwestern Nevada, U. S. Geological 
Survey, Mon., vol. 11, ites. 

Described in bibliography for 1886. 

Abstract, Scottish Oeogr. Mag., vol. 3, pp. 
466-472. 1887. 

Reprint of prelimiDary abstract aa given by 
author and a general description of the lake 
basin, playas, thinolito, and the beaches and 
their displacements. 

Abstract, Science, voL 10; pp. 78-79. 1887. 

Description of the work and analysis of its 
contento without critical comment. 

[Natural gas and coal in Chesterfield 

County, Virginia]. 

The Richmond Diqwtch, Feb. 20, 1887. 
Describes the Richmond coal basin and 
points out the improbability of its yielding gas. 



■ — Notes on the faults of the Great 
Basin and of the eastern base of the 
Sierra Nevada. 

Washington, Phil. Soc., Bull., vol. 9, pp. 5- 
6. 1887. 
Nenes Jahrbnch, 1887, band 2, as. 317-318. 

1887. 

Describes the Great Basin type of mountain 
structure, the extent of the area which it char- 
acterixes, the structure of the Sierra Nevada, 
and the evidence of post-Quatomary move- 
ment in the great displacement along its east< 
em base. Gives a list of papers containing 
descriptions of Great Basin structure. 

— Subaerlal decay of rocks and origin 
of the red color of certain fosmations. 



BinOH.] 



RECOKD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



139 



RUSSELL, I. C. — CoQtinued. 

U. S. Geol. Snrrty, BolL, voL 8, pp. 595-687, 
pU.l>y (Na88). 1889. 

Abetracts, Am. Geologist, voL S^ |ip. 110-111. 
1890; Eng. and ICining Jour., vol. 49, pp. 807- 
308, 1 coL 40.' 1800; Canadian Record of Sci- 
ence I vol. 4, pp. 74-75. 1800 ; Popular Science 
Monthly, voL 38, p. 567, i col. 1890, 

RoTiew by J. D. Dana, Am. Jovr. Sci., 3d 
series, vol. 39, pp. 317-319. 1890. 

Acconnt of rock decay in the Piedmont and 
Muthem ApitalachiWD regions, and of the 
charaoteristica and composition of the resid- 
ual products. CoDsiders the conditions favor- 
ing rook decay and the canoes affecting the 
distribution of residaal deposits in the Ap- 
palachian region. Discusses the origin of 
the red color of certain furmations, especially 
ofthe Newark group. Inolodes a bibliography 
of the subject. 



RUSSELL, I.e.— Continued. 

Snbaerial deposits of the arid region 

of North America. 

Geol. Magazine, decade m, voL 6, pp. 242- 
260,289-295. 1880. 

Deaeription of sevenl deposits, especially 
of the cakiareous clays to which the term 
* * adobe " is applied. An account of its distri- 
butiOB, thickness, phyaioal and chemical 
characters, organic remaina, mode of forma- 
tion, alid relation to playa and stream depos- 
its, and OMuparison with the loess of China. 

Thd Newark system. 

Am. aeologist, vol. 3, pp. 178-183. 1889. 

List of designations and correlations of the 
Jura-Trias of eastern North Amierioa ; brief 
review of its classification and nomenclature, 
and proposition and definition of the twm 
* ' Newark system. ' ' 



S. 



ST. JOHN, O. Notes on the geology of 
Bonth western Kansas. 

Kansas Board of Agriculture, 6th report, 
part2. pp. 132-152. 1887. 

Description of physiography and of Triassic 
(f) Dakota Niobrara, Tertiary, and Pleisto- 
cene formations. 
St Louis Academy of Science, Trans., 
vol. 5. 

Geology of Macon Connty, Missouri, 
McGee. 

SALISBIJR7, B. D. Terminal 
moraines in north Qermany. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 36, pp. 401- 
407. 1888. 

General description of course, topography, 
and structure. 

Driftless area of upper Mississippi 

vaUey. See CHAMBERLIN« T. C, 
and. 

SAMPSON, F. A. Notes on the Sub- 
carboniferons series at Sedalia, Mis- 
soon 

Hew Yotk Acad. Sci., Trans., vol. 7, pp. 
248-247. 1888. 

Notice of fossils from the Chouteau lime- 
stone and reference to the thickness of the 
Chouteau limestone and Burlington series. 

Santa Barbara Society of Natural 
History, Bulletin No. 1. 
Infusorial earth of Santa Barbara, 
Finch. 

8C9NEIBER1 Edward A. An analysis 
of a soil from Washington Territory, 



SCHNBIDBR, Edward A.— Con tinned, 
and some remarks on the ntiiity of 
. soil analysis. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 86, pp. 238- 
247. 1888. 

Includes description and analysis of augite- 
andesite firom which the soils are derived. 

School of Mines Quarterly, voL 8. 

Bay's Mountain, Tennessee, Willis. 

Great Falls coal fields Montana, 
Newberry. 

Kersantite, Newberry. 

Index to current geologic literatare, 
Merrill, F. J.H. 

Origin of graphite, Newberry. 

Marble of Hawkins County, Tennes- 
see, Willis. 

voL 9. 

Coals of Colorado, Newberry. 
Archean of New Jersey and New 
York, Britton. 



voL 10. 



Origin of the loess, Newberry. 
Marble deposits ofthe western United 

States, Newberry. 
Oil fields of Colorado, Newberry. 
Graphitic anthracite in Idaho, Jen- 

NEY. 

Dry lakes of Nevada and California, 
Jenney. 

SCHUSTER, M. Mikroskopische beo- 
bachtnngen an califomisohen ge- 
steinen. 



140 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BtTLL. 75. 



SCHUSTBR, M.^Continned. 

Neves Jahrbnch, 1887, BeU.-bd. u. 461-678. 
tafel 17-20. 

Abetraot, American Naturaliet, toL 22, p. 
482,1 p. 1887. 

Detailed desoriptioii of the mieropetrogra- 
pby of eighty rook gpeoimena firom the Sierra 
Nevada, aiKl a discoaaimi of the mineralogic 
Gonstitaenta. The paper is afOoompaoied by 
four ancolored platea. 

SCETWARZyT. E. Notes on the ore oc- 
carrenoe of the Red Mountain district. 

Colorado, Sci. Soc., Proo., yoL 3, pp^ 77-8S. 
1889. 

Contains some incidental zeferences to 
geologic featnrea of the dietrict. 

SCIENCE. 

Mineral physiology and physiogra- 
phy. 

Science, voL 9, pp. 142-148. 1887. 

Beview of Hant, especially of the part i^la> 
tive to the origin of crystalline rocks ; objec- 
tions being advanced to the crenitic hypothe* 
sis, and to some of the conolnsions in regard 
to the origin of serpentines. 



Jukes-Browne's historical geology. 



Science, vol. 9, pp. 424-425. 1887. 
General description and review. 



Walcott on the Cambrian faunas. 



Science, voL 9, pp. 545-546. 1887. 

Sammary and abstract of Walcott's "Sec- 
ond contribution to the studies of the Cam- 
brian faunas of North America." 



Section £ [Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., re- 
port of proaeedings]. 

Science, vol. 10, pp. 87-88. 1887. 

Statement of Gilbert's attitude toward the 
work of the International Geologic Congress ; 
notice of Frazer's report on the Archean, and 
statement of objection to the application of 
the term Archean to all pre-Cambrian rocks. 
Notice of Powell's objections to the color 
scheme proposed by the congress. 

[On Hiuman's letter on the laws 



of corrasion.] 

Science, vol. 12, p. 12D, | col. 1888. 
Definition of Powell's law of corrasion and 
its application. 

Science, vol. 9. 

Submerged trees of Columbia River, 

DuTTON. Emmons. 
Hunt's mineral physiography and 

physiology, Science. 
Serpentine of Syracuse, Williams, 

G. H. 
Quebec group, Selwyn. 



Scienoe, voL 9— Continued. 

Fossils from Kicking Horse Pass, Lap- 
worth. 

International Congress of Geologists, 
Frazbb. 

Jukes-Browne's historical geology, 

SCIXNCB. 

Florida geologic suryey, Kost. 
Walcott on Cambrian fauna, Sciknck. 
Equivalenee of American Tertiaries, 

Hiloard. 
Cretaceous river bed, Pond. 
Correlation of Canadian and Enro- 

peai^ geology, Dawson, J. W. 
Well at Oxford, Ohio, Jambs. 
Geologic questions, Frazer. 
Geologic history of Lake Lahontan, 

Russell. 



voL 10. 



Section £, Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., 

Science. 
Beaches and deltas of glacial Lake 

Agassiz, Upham. 
Geologists' Congress, Frazer. 
Glacier on Hague's Peak, Colorado, 

Stone. 
Relations of Laramie molluscan 

fauna, White, C. A. > 
Origin of mountain ranges, Davis, 

W. M. 
Is there a diamond field in Kentucky T 

DiLLER and KuNZ. 
Classification of lakes, Davis, W. M. 
Synopsis of flora of Laramie, Ward. 
Exploration in Yukon district, Daw- 
son, G. M. 
Keweeuawan system, Wadsworth. 
Rocks from BafiSn Land, Bell. 
Mount Taylor and Zuni Plateau, 

Dutton. 



vol 11. 



Trinity formation, Hill,^. T. 

The Iroquois beach, Spencer. 

Transcontinental railroads. Lang. 

Drift north of Lake Snperior, Spen- 
cer. 

Eozoon Canadense, Selwtn. 

Sonora earthquakes, Goodfellow. 

Geological observations of Yukon ex- 
pedition, Dawson, G. M. 

Vertebrate fauna of the Puerco series, 
Cope. 

Agriculture and late Quaternary his- 
tory, Hiloard. 



V 



DARTON.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



141 



Science, voL ll~Continaed. 

Crenitic hypothesis and moantain 

bailding, Shalbr. 
MoDtviUe serpentine, MerrilL| G. P. 

vol. 12. 

Prevention of floods in the lower' Mis- 

sissippiy Powell. 
International Geolo^cal Congress, 

Cook. 
St. Lawrence basin and the Great 

Lakes, Spbncbr. 
Archean rocks of the Northwest, 

WiNCHELL, A. 

Coal measures of Kansas, Wooster. 

Laws of corrasion, Hinman. 

On Hinman's letter on corrasion. 
Science. 

The limit of drift, Wooster. 

Report — Operations of the National 
Survey, Powell. 

Floodain the lower Missouri) Meter. 

Topographic map of New Jersey, Da- 
vis, W. M. 

The laws of hydraulic degradation, 
Powell. 

voL 13. 



Great Lake basins of St. Lawrence, 
Drummond. 

Permian rocks of Texas, Hill, R. T. 

A river pirate, Davis. 

History of porphyritic quartz in 
eruptives, Diller. 

Age of Denver formation, Cope. 

Building stones of east Texas, Pen- 
rose. 

Stillwater well, Meades. 

-- voL 14, 



Wright's ''Ice age'' in North Amer- 
ica, W. M. D. • 

North American Mesozoic, White, 
C. A. 

Champlaiu period in Susquehanna 
valley, Basuore. 

The contoured map of Massachusetts, 
Davis, W. M. 

Scientific American Supplement, vol. 
23. 
Features of recent earthquakes, Mc- 

Gee. 
Muir glacier, Wright. 
Prehistoric hearth under Quaternary 
of western New York, Gilbert. 

vol. 25. 

Wyoming oil fields, Uiggs. 



Scientific American Supplement, voL 
26— Continiled. 
Mica-mining in North Carolina, 

Phillips. 
Quartzites and siliceous concretions, 

Crosby. 
St. Lawrence hasin and the Great 

Lakes, Spencer. 
Petite Anse salt mine, Pomeroy. 
Muir glacier, Alaska, Chickering. 

vol 27. 

Among the Pennsylvania slate quar- 
ries, Merrill, G. P. 

Colorado oil fields, Newberry. 

Artesian well at Davenport, Iowa, 
Tiffany. 

SCOtTt W. B. The upper Eocene lacus- 
trine formations of the United States. 
[Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, vol. 36, p. 
217, i p. 1888. 

G^eneral r^amd. Discussion of relation of 
Washakie beds to the Wahsatch beds, and 
the position and faunal relations of the Uinta 
formation. 

Scottish Oeographical Magazine, vol. 
3. 
CoKyrado River of the West, Cadell. 
Creologio history of Lake Lahontan, 
BlfSSELL, I. C. 

Marhle Island, Hudson Bay, Bell. 
SCOVELL, J. T. Erosion in Indiana. 

Am. Natnralist, voL 22, p. 04, 7 lines. 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to Indiana Academy 
of Sciences. 

Discussion of its amount aod the proportion 
of the drift derived from sources in and out- 
side of the State. 

[ ] Another old channel of the Niagara 

River. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 3, pp. 195-196, i p. 1889. 
Notice of its course and topographic char- 
acteristics. 

SEARS, John H. [Remarks oq the ge- 
ology of the vicinity of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts.] 

Essex Inst., Bull., vol. 20, pp. 26-26. 1888. 
General statement in regard to the nature 
and extent of the granites. 

Greological and mineralogical notes. 

No. 1. Sodalite. 

Essex Inst., Bull., vol 21, pp. 88-93. 1889. 

Includes references to relations, distribu- 
tion, and petrography of some of the syenites, 
diorites, granit-es, and diabases of eastern 
MaHsachusetts, and to the origin of certain 
bowlders by disintegration in situ. 



142 



RECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



SBELY*, H. M. Origioal Chazy rocks in 
New York. See BRAINERD, Ezra, 
and. 

SELW^N, Alfred R. C. The Qaebec 
group. 

Science, voL 9, pp. 287-268. 1887. 

Describes the or^cinAl members of the 
group, which are now known to range from 
pre- Cambrian into the Lorraine or Hadson 
River, and their structural relations in the 
Quebec area. 

Sntnmary report of the operations of 

the Geological Sar^ey for the year 1886. 

Canada, G-eol. and Nat. Hist. Surrey, Re- 
port, 1886, part A, p. 87. 1887. 

Consists mainly of abstraets of reports by 
McConnell. Tyrrell, Blls, Bel], Bailey and 
Mclnnes, ChiUmers, Fletcher, and Faribault, 
published in full in the same volume. Prelimi- 
nary reports, by Lawson, on the regtpn east 
of the Lake of the Woods ; Bowman, on the 
Caribou mining district ; Coste, on sheet 113, 
Ontario ; Ingall, on Thunder Bay mining re- 
gions ; and Laflamme on lower Paleozoic ad- 
joining the Laurentian to the north of the St. 
Lawrence ; and notes on age and relations of 
certain volcanic rocks in eastern Quebec, and 
age and relations of slate and limestones of 
the vicinity of the city of Quebec. 



— The Huronian of Canada. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 61-62, ^ p. 1888. 
Discussion of the status of the term Ta- 
conic and its application to the Huronian. 

— [Notes on Marcou's paper, "The Ta- 
coDic of Georgia, and the report on the 
geology of Vermont."] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 181-135. 1888. 

Discussion of the position of the slates in 
Quebec, and of Montmorency and Charles- 
bourg. Ileferonce iA) components of the '' Ta- 
conic system." 

— Answer to Dr. Persifor Frazer's cir- 



cular, dated Philadelphia, 9th May, 
1887. [On the subdivisions of the Ar- 
chean, classification of eruptives in the 
Archean, unconformities in the Ar- 
chean, and use of tf.rm "Taconic."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, p. 55, ^ p. 

— [On use of the term **Taconic."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 1 line. 
Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 207. 1888. 

— On new facts relating to Eozoon 
Canadenso. 

Science, vol. 11, p. 146, J col. 1888. 
Review of part of J. W. Dawson's paper 
*' On new facts relating to Eozoon Canadense." 



SELW7N, Alfred B.C.— Continued. 

Disonssfon of the use of the term " Middle 
Lanrentian." the relatioBa and origin of the 
Luirentian limesUmes, and the ^pUve na- 
ture of the "so-called N^rian or upper Lan* 
rentian." 

"Two systems oonfoanded in the 

Huronian.'' . 

Am. Geologist, voL 8, pp. 339-340. 1889. 

Review of Alexander Winohell's paper by 
that name. Discusses daasifieation of some 
of the iwe-Cambrian formations in the Nortb> 
west. 

Canadian ghunal elanificatiou for 

the province of Quebec, by Jules Mar- 
oon. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc., voL 24, pp. 
21^218. 1889. 

Objections to statements of Marcon in re- 
gard to some of the relations in the Qaebec 
region. 



SHALER, N. 8. Report ** * 
lantio coast division. 



At- 



U. S. Geol. Snrvey. Sixth Report, J. W. 
FoweU, 1884- 'Bfi, pp. 18-22. 1885. 

Calls attention to the existence of a Paleo- 
zoic and volcanic series near Eastport, Maine, 
and describes some features of the Rhode 
Island coal region and the Tertiary of Matr- 
tha's Vineyard. 

— Preliminary report on sea - coast 
swamps of the east-ern United States. 

U. S. Geol. Surrey, Sixth Beport, J. W. 
PoweU, i884-'85, pp. 363-398. 1885. 

Abstract. Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 258-269. 
1888. 

I](etailed discussion of the conditions affect- 
ing the formation of coastal swamps, and of 
shore-lines favoraUe for mar^h accumulation. 
Describes the Plum Island marahes and some 
features of others in New Engfautd, and dis- 
cnsses their history. Gives a list of the prin- 
cipal salt marshes between the Hudson Rivw 
and Portland, Maine. 

— Fluviatile swamps of New England. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 8d series, vol. 33, pp. 210-221. 
1887. 

. Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, voL 
33, pp. 142-143, ^ p. 1887. 

Calls attention to kame nature of the upper 
terraces of some New England rivers, and 
considers them the remnants of mu'ine depos- 
its of a glacial submergence. Discusses the 
amount time, and extent of oscillations of sur- 
face elevation indicated by the river terraces, 
and erosion along south-flowing streams, the 
absence of river-terraces and existence of 
food-plains along north-flowing streams, and 
the buried forests on the eastern coast of 
Massachusetti^. 



1^ 



DABTOK.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



143 



N. S.— CoDtiniied. 
Petioleum. 



Kentucky Oeol. Snrrey, Bnll., No. 1, pp. 5- 
12. [1887?] 

BiacuMion of origin and horizon, conditions 
detormining the storage of oil in the rocks, 
and probable oil-bearing areas in Kentucky. 

— On the original connection of the 
eastern and western coal fields of the 
Ohio valley. 

Harv.,Mas. Oomp. Zobl., Memoirs, voL 16 
[No. 2), pp. 1-11. 40. 1887. 

Includes a discussion of the time of uplift 
of the Cincinnati axis and the subsequent 
jceologic history of its vicinity, the extent to 
nrhich it was buried by later formations, and 
the rate of degradation of the Carboniferous 
from the rei^on between the present out- 
crops. 

— Report : Atlantic Coast Division of 
Geology. 

IT. S. G0OL Surrey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
FowAl, 1885.'86, pp. 61-45. 1888. . 

Beference to glacial and post-glacial history 
of Nantucket, the Tertiary of Martha's Vine- 
yard, the post-glacial history of Mount Desert 
Island, the voloanio ash-beds in the vicinity 
of Honnt Desert Island, the relations of the 
bowlder train extending from Cumberland, 
Bhode Idand, to Martlia's Vineyard, and the 
origin of sea-coast swamps and of nodular 
phosphatic deposits. 

— Report on the geology of Martha's 
Viueyard. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, SerenA Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885-'86, pp. 207-363, pis. XIX-XXIX. 
188a 

Abstracts, Science, voL 13, p. 343, |coL ; Am. 
Geologist, TpL 4, pp. 104-106. 1889. 

Description of glacial deposits, terraces, 
Cretaceous, Tertiary, structure, jKwt-glacial 
erosion add deposits, and discussion of re- 
lations of the Tei tlary members ; the origin of 
their materials and the history of their depo- 
sition, the straUgraphic relatious of some 
doubtful members, and the nature of the dis- 
locations in the Vineyard series. Accompa- 
nied by colored geologic maps. 

— Origin of the divisions between the 
layers of stratified rocks. 

Boston Soc. Vat. Hist., Proc., vol. 23, pp. 
40a419. 1888. 

Discussion hf the conditioun affecting dejM)- 
siticw of sediments, and the agency of earth- 
quakes in deateoying life at the sea bottom 
and originaiting divisions between the sedi- 
oientary layers. 

— On the geology of the Cambrian dis- 
trict of Bristol County, Massachasetts. 



N. S,- Continued. 

Harv., Mus. Oomp. Zodl. , Bull., voL 16, pp. 
13-26, No. 2, map. 1888. 

Abstract, Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, 
pp. 76-77, 1 p. 1889. . 

Announcement of Cambrian age ; references 
to relations of a^aoeot Carboniferous and 
pre-Cambrian fbmiations, discussion of struc- 
tural relations, extent, correlation with other 
Cambrian and supposed Cambrian areas in 
Massachusetts ; age and relations of inclosed 
gnuiitic intrusions, origin of sediments, con- 
ditions of deiMMition and position of shore 
lines in the general region at various geologic 
periods. Act'/ompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

— The crenitic hypothesis and moun- 
tain building. 

ISteience, vol. 11, pp. 280-281. 1888. 

Discussion of the agency of the transfer of 
materials from below upward by volcanism 
and crenitic agencies, and the effect of de- 
creased pressure caused by erosion. 

— Introduction. 

Nature md origin of deposits of phosphate 
of lime, by R. A. F. Penrose, jr., U. S. Geol. 
Survey, Bull., vol. 7, pp. 483-49L Ko. 46. 
1888. 

Abstract, Science , vol. 13, pp. 144-146. 1889. 

Includes n ferences to the nature and gene- 
sis of the several classes of phosphatic do- 
posits and the relations and composition of 
pfa|>6pbatic siderite bed in Bath County, Ken- 
tucky. 

— The geology of Nantucket. 

n. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol. 8, pp. 601- 
653, pis. X (No. 53). 1889. 

Abstracts, Am. Geologist, vol. 5, pp. 111- 
114,1890; Popular Science Monthly, vol. 36, 
pp.567, (eol. 1890. 

Topography, general geological structure. 
origin of the detrital materials, fossiliferous 
deposits, succession of geologic events, post- 
glacial history, recent coast changes. 

On glacial train from Cumberland, 



Rhode Island. See CHAMBERLIN, 
Report on glacial geology. 

SHUTT, F. T. Canadian apatite. 

Canadian Inst., Proc, 3d series, vol. 5, pp. 
30-38. 1887. 

General description of the apatite-bearing 
rocks. 

Silurian, lower. 
ArkansaSf zinc mining, Eng. and Min- 
ing Jour. 
Canada f along the Ottawa, Ami. 
Chazy at Aylmer, Quebec, Sowter. 
contact of Paleozoic and Archoan in 
Quebec, Laflamme. 



144 



BECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



Silurian, lower — Continuecl. 
Canada — Oontinaed. 

collectioDfi in mnsenm, Nova Scotia, 

HONETMAX. 

Chazy at Ottawa, Ami. 

Eozoio abd Paleozoic of Canada, 

Dawson, J. W. 
falls of Montmorenci, Am. Geologist. 
fossils from Kicking Horse Pass, 

Lap WORTH, 
fossils in city of Qnebec, Ford. 
geological classification, Qnebec, by 

Marcou, Selwyn. 
geology of the Montmorenci, Em- 
mons, E. James. Am. Geologist. 

Selwyn. 
geology of vicinity of Qnebec, Mab- 

cou. 
graptolites from St. Lawrence River 

region, Lapworth. 
graptolites from Dease River, British 

Columbia, Lapworth. 
Lake Winnipeg to Hndson Bay, Low. 
Manitoba, Dawson, G. M. Mc- 

Charles. 
New Branswick, Bailey and Mc- 

INNES. 

northern part of the Dominion, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

northern Maine, New BruDswick, and 
Qnebec, Bailey. 

Nova Scotia, Gnysborough, Antigo- 
nish, and Picton, Fletcher. 

Picton coal-field region, Gilpin. 

phosphatic nodules in Chazy about 
Ottawa, Ami. 

portions of eastern townships, Ells. 

Quebec group, Dawson, J. W. 
Hunt. Laflamme. Selwyn. 

relations to Archean at Quebec, I^a- 
flamme. 

relations of Canadian to European, 
Dawson, J. W. 

Rocky Mountains near the 5lBt par- 
allel, MCCONNELL 

Russell and Cambridge, Ontario, 
Craig. Ami. 

Sceptropora, Manitoba, Ulrich. 

sequence of formations about Ottawa, 
Ami. 

sponges at Little Metis, Dawson, 
J.W. 

Taconic of eastern Newfoundland, 

HOWLEY. 

Utica formation of Ottawa, Wood- 
WABD, 



Silurian, lovreir— Continued. 

Utica fossils at Point d, Pic, Ami. 

Utica fossils from Ridean, Ami. 

Utica fossils from Kicking Horse 
Pass, Lapworth. 

vicinity of Government farm, Ottawa, 
Ami. 

vicinity of Qnebec, Ford. La- 
flamme. Marcou. Selwyn. 

Yukon expedition, Dawson, G. M. 
Colorado f BrCnton. Emmons. S. F. 
Lakes. Siver. Smith, W. B. 

TiLDEN. IhLSENG. BlOW. 

ConneoUeitty Taconio system of Em- 
mons, Walcott. 

Georgia, aluminum ore, Nichols. 
geological survey, Spencer, J. W. 

IllinoiSf Sceptropora, Ulrich. 

Indianaf diameter of Silurian Island 
about Cincinnati, Dennis. 

Jotra, hematite in Allamakee County, 
Orr. 
southeastern Iowa, Gordon. 
well at Davenport, Tiffany. 
well at Keokuk, Gordon. 
Maqnoketa shales, 
well at Washington, Calvin. 

Kentucky, correlation of lower Silurian 
in Ohio valley, Ulrich. 

diameter of Silurian Island about 
Cincinnati, Dennis. 

Garrard County, Linney. 

Mason, Bath, Fleming, Henry, 
Shelby, and Oldham counties, Lin- 
ney. 

Marion County, Knott. 

Nelson County, Linney. 

rocks of Central Kentucky, Linney. 

Spencer County, Linney. 

MainCf Eastport region, Sbaler. 
northern Maine, Bailey. 

Massachusetts f Great Barrington, Ju- 

LIEN. 

Taconic system, Dana, J. D. Hunt. 
Walcott. 

Minnesota, artesian wells. Hall, C. W. 

Chisago, Isanti, Anoka, and Becker 
counties, Upham. • 

natural gas, Winchell, N. H. 

Trenton at Minneapolis and St. Paul, 
Hall, C. W. 

Wabasha, Goodhue, Dakota, Henne- 
pin, Ramsey, and Washington 
counties, Winchell, N. H, 



DABTON.l 



RECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



145 



Silurian, lower — Continued. 
Minnesota — Continned. 
connties, Winchbll, N. H. 
some maps of Minnesota, Upham. 
Stillwater well, Meades. 
Missouri, form of ore deposits in lime- 
stone, Hbnrich. 
history of Ozark uplift, Broadhead. 
Macon County, MoGee. 
Missouri River, Broadhead. 
Montana J Gallatin region, Hatdem. 
Nebrashay well at Lincoln, Russell, 
F. W. 
well in Pawnee Connty, Russell, 
F. W. 
Nevadttf Tempiute Mountain, New- 
berry. 
New Jersey f map. Cook. Martin. 
porphyrite of northwestern New 
Jersey, Kemp. 
New York, building stones, Smock. 
Calciferons fossils of Lake Cham- 
plain, Whitfield. 
camptonite dike, Washington Connty, 

Kemp and Marsters. 
Dutchess and Putnam counties. 

Smock. 
Norman's Kills graptolite beds. Lap- 
worth. 
fossils in Columbia County, Dwight. 
original Chazy rooks, Brainerd and 

Seely. 
Taoonlc system of Emmons, Marcou, 
Walcott. Dwight. Dana, J. D. 
Wappinger valley region, etc., 

Dwight. 
well near Utica, Walcott. 
Nomenclaturef report of subcommittee 
on Paleozoic, International Con- 
gress of Geologists, Winchell, 
N. H. [et al.]. 
Silurian in geology, Dana, J. D. ' 
some forgotton Taconio literature, 

VOGDES. 

Canadian geological classification, 
by Marcou, Selwyn. 

Taconic question, Dana, J. D. Hunt. 
Marcou. Selwyn. Winchell, 
N. H. Newberry. Walcott. 
Winchell, A. Miller. 
North Carolina, Hiawassee valley, Col- 
ton. 
Ohio, diameter of Silurian island about 
Cincinnati, Dennis. 

gas well at Oxford, Jambs. 

Bull. 75 10 



Silurian, lower — Continned. 
O^io— Continued, 
geology of Ohio, Orton. 
lime in Ohio, Orton. 
physical history of Cincinnati rocks, 

Perry. 
report on oil and gas, Orton. 
sedimentation in Cincinnati group, 

«J AMES. 

southwestern Ohio, James. 

Todd's Fork, Foerste. 

Trenton limestone, Orton. 

vicinity of Cincinnati, Burke. 
Pennsylvania, Cumberland - Lebanon 
valley, d'Invilliers. 

four great sandstones, Claypolb. 

Lebigh River section, Hill, F. A. 

materials of the Appalachians, Clay- 
polb. 

Philadelphia region, Rand. 

Radnor township, Delaware Connty, 
Rand. 

slate quarries, Merrill, G. P. 
Tennessee, marble of Hawkins County, 

Willis. 
Vermont, fossils in lower Taconio of 
Emmons, Walcott. 

Taconio of Georgia and report on 
geology of Vermont, Marcou. 

Taconio system of Emmons, Mar- 
cou. Miller. Walcott. Dana, 
J. D. 
Virginia, Trenton limestone from Lex- 
ington, analysis, Riggs. 

southwestern, Stevenson. 

New River-Cripple Creek region, 
d'Invillibrs and McCreath. 

Upper Cumberland valley, Mc- 
Creath and d'Inyillibrs. 
Silurian, upper. 
Alabama, Birmingham region, Mc- 
Crbath and d'Inyillibrs. Brain- 
erd. 

geologicf^ survey, Spencer, J. W. 
Canada, At-ta-wa-pish-kat and Albany 
rivers. Bell. 

Eozoio and Paleozoic of Canada, 
Dawson, J. W. 

fislvds from New Brunswick, Mat- 
thews. 

iron and other ores in Ontario, Ives. 

gypsum in northern Manitoba, Tyr- 

RBLL. 

Lake Winnipeg to Hudson Bay, Low* 
Manitoba, McCharlbs. 



146 



KECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



iBULL. 75. 



Silnxiaii, npper — Continued. 
Canada — Continaed. 
nematophyton from Gasp^, Dawson, 

J.W. 
New Brunswick, Bailbt. Bailbt 

and MclNNES. 
northern part of the Dominioni Daw-* 

80N,.G.M. 

northern Maine, New Brunswick, and 

Quebec, Bailey. 
Nova Scotia: Aylesford, Kings 

County, HONETMAK. 

Nora Scotia: Gnysborough, Antigo- 
nlsh, and Picton, Fletcher. 

Nova Scotia: Pictou coal-field region, 
Gilpin. 

Nova Scotia: Silurian collection in 
Provincial Museum, Honeyman. 

organisms in southern New Bruns- 
wick, Matthew. 

portions of eastern townships, Ells. 

petroleum field of Ontario, Bell. 

relations of Canadian geology to 
European, Dawson, G. M. 

Rocky Mountains near the 51st par- 
allel, McConnell. 

Ungava district, Labrador, Turner. 

well at Port Colbome, MoRae. 

Yukon expedition, Dawson, G. M. 
Colorado^ Aspen, Brunton. Emmons, 
S.F. Henrich. Lakes. Siver. 

Chaff'ee County, Smith, W. B. 

geology of Colorado ore deposits, 
Lakes. 

iron resources, Chauvenet. 

Leadville region, Emmons, S. F. 
Georgiay Clinton fossils, Foerste. 
Indiana, diameter of Silurian island 
about Cincinnati, Dennis. 

County geology, Gorby. Thomp- 
son, M. 

building stones and gas, Thomp- 
son, M. 

geology of Indiana, Thompson, M. 

geology of southeastern Indiana, 
Gordon. 

St. Paul, Beachler. 

Wabash arch, Gorby. Thompson, 
M. Phinney. 
Joira, well at Keokuk, Gord6n, 

well at Washington, Calvin. 

well at Davenport, Tiffany. 
Kansas^ Leavenworth well, Jameson. 
Etntucky, Bath County phosphatio 
deposits, Shaler. 

Clark, Lincoln, Mercer, Montgomery, 
and Washington counties, Linnbt. I 



Silurian, upper — Continued. 
JCeftttfcX^— Continued. 

Garrard County, Linney. 
Marion County, Knott. 
Nelson, Mason, Bath, Fleming, 
Henry, Oldham, and Shelby coun- 
ties, Linney. 
new horizons of oil and gas, Orton. 
Pound Gap region, Crandall. 

Proctor. 
rocks of central Kentucky, Linney. 
Spencer County, Linney. 

AfaifM, Aroostook County, Bailey. 
Eastport region, Shaler. 

Maryland, Albirupean formation, Heil- 

PRIN. 

Minnesotay natural gas wells, Win- 

chell, N. H. 
Miswurif Macon County, McGee. 
Montana, Gallatin region, Hayden. 
Nebraska, well at Lincoln, Russell, 

F.W. 
well in Pawnee County, Russell, 

F.W. 
New Hampshire, fossils of Littleton, 

Dana, J. D. Pumpelly. 

New Jersey, geologic map, Cook. 
Green Pond Mountain group, Mer- 
rill, F. J. H. 
map of vicinity of New York, Martin. 

New York, building stones, Smock. 
cement and gypsum in Buffalo, 

Pohlman. 
geology of Buffalo, Ashburner. 
life history of Niagara, Pohlman. 
lower Helderberg of Cayuga Lake, 

Williams, S. G. 
Niagara shales, Ringueberg. 
petroleum and gas, Ashburner. 
salt wells and deposits, Bishop. 

Newberry. Wyatt. 
serpentine at Syracuse, Williams, 

G.H. 
well at Morristown, Prosser. 

Nomenclature, report of subcommittee 
on lower Paleozoic, International 
Congress of Geologists, Winchbll, 
N.H. (etal.). 
Silurian in geology, Dana, J. D. 

North Carolina, Hiawasse valley, Col- 
ton. 
Ohio, cements. Lord. 
Clinton group, Foerste. 
diameter of Silurian island about 
Cincinnati, Dennis. 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



147 



Silurian, npper— Continiied. 
Ohio — Continaed. 
geology of Ohio, Orton. 
gypsum, Orton. 
lime, Orton. 

new horizons of oil and gas, Orton. 
Ohio valley, Shaler. 
report on oil and gas, Orton. 
section at Todd's Foric, Fobrste. 
section of soathwest Ohio, Jame9. 
vicinity of Cincinnati, Burke. 
Penmylvania, flexures in central Penn- 
sylvania, Margarie. 
four great sandstones, Clatpols. 
Lehigh River section. Hill, F. A. 

WiNSLOW. 

materials of the Appalachians, Clat- 

POLE. 

paint ores along Lehigh River, Hill, 

F. A. 
rivers and valleys, Davis, W. M. 
Tennessee^ Bays Mountains, Willis. 
east Tennessee fossil ore, Cowlan. 
Proctor. 
VirginiaSf Greenbrier County, Page. 
New River-Cripple Creek region, 

d'Invilliers and McCreath. 
upper Cumberland valley, Mc- 
Creath and d'Invilliers. 
southwestern Virginia, Stevenson. 
Wyoming^ report of Geologist, Ricketts. 

8IVER, Leonard D. The geology of the 
Aspen, Colorado, ore deposits. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., toL 45, pp. 195-196. 
1888. 

Description of the faults, flexures, and 
stratigraphy of Aspen Mountain. 

SMITEt, Eugene A. Report of the sub- 
committee on Cenozoic (marine). 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee Reports, 1888, F, pp. 19. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 269-284. 1888. 

BesoriptioD of stratigraphy of Tertiary of 
Alabama and references to its characteristics 
in the other Gnlf States. Disonssion of the 
occurrence, range, equivalency, and taxon- 
omy of its subdivision. Includes extracts 
from letters by T. H. Aldrioh, B. W. Hilgard, 
L. C. Johnson, Angelo Heilprin, J. S. New- 
berry, R. P. Whitfield, W. H. Dall, Alex. 
Winohell, and Joseph L^Conte. 

• and JOHNSON, Lawrence C. Ter- 
tiary and Cretaceous strata of the Tus- 
caloosa, Tombigbee, and Alabama 

rivers. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., roL 7, pp. 15^ 
841,pls.l-XZl. No. 43. 1887. 



SMITEt, Engene A., and JOHNSON, 

Lawrence C. — Continued. 

Abstracts, Am. Geologist, voL 4, pp. 188« 
191, 1889; Am. Naturalist, vol. 24, pp. 164- 

165, 1890. 

Detailed descriptions of formations ftom 
white limestone of the Tertiary to the Tusoii> 
loosa of supposed lower Cretaceous age, and 
of flexures and faults, and discussion of char- 
acteristics, relations, genesis, extension, and 
equivalence of the various members and their 
structural relations, relative positions, and 
correlation at some of the exposures. Dis- 
cussion of age, correlation, and relations of 
Tuscaloosa formation, with a r6sum6 by W J 
McGee. Accompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

SBAITH, Walter B. Mineralogical notes. 
No. II. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol. 2, pp. 161- 

166. 18i<8. 

Includes a description of the occurrence 
and relations of a corundum schist in Chsffee 
County, Colorado. 

Smithaonian Inatitution, Report; 
1886-87. 

North American Geology for 1886, 
Darton. 

SMOCK, John C. A geological recon- 
naissance in the crystalline rock 
region, Dutchess, Putnam, and West- 
chester counties, New York. 

New York, Thirty-ninth Report State 
Museum of Nat. Hist. 1885, pp. 166-185, pL 
1886. 

Describes the boundaries, lithology, aad 
structure of the " Archean *' rocks of Stissing 
and Dover Mountains and the highlands east 
of the Hudson. Discusses their relations to 
the associated quartzites, limestones, and 
crystalline schists, and their equivalency. 

Building stones in the State of New 

York. 

New York State Mns., IBuII. No. 3, 152 
pages. 1888. 

Beferences to relations at various localities 
in formations from Archean to Devonian, 
preceded by a chapter on geological position 
and geographical distribution. 

SNO'W, F. H. [Remarks on nickel- 
bearing rock in Logan County, Kansas. ] 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, p. 216, | p. 1889. 
Reference to characteristics, age, and rela- 
tions of the rock. 

Soci^t^ g^ologiqne de France, Bulle- 
tin, tome 15. 
Relief map of part of Pennsylvania, 
Margarib, 



148 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL.7& 



South America, Cerro de Pasoo, Peru, 

HODQES. 

Fernando Noronha, Brannbr. Gill. 

Williams, G. H. 
Mesozoic of Sergipe-Alagofts region, 

Brazil, Brannek. 
Cretaceous and Tertiary, Sergipe- 

Alagofts basin, Brazil, Branner. 
Monazite in rocks, Brazil, Derby. 
Qaateroary deposits, recent eleyation 

and loess, Brazil, Mills. 

South Carolina, contact phenomena, 
Richards. 
King's Moantain region, Furman. 
phosphate deposits, Penrose. 

SCWTER, T. W. Edwin. Preliminary 
notes on the Ctiazy formation at Ayl- 
mer, Province of Quebec. 

Ottawa Naturalist, vol. 2, pp. 11-16. 1888. 

Description of the stratigraphy and paleon- 
tology of the Chazy and its relations to the 
Black Biver beds. 

SPENCER, James. On the occurrence 
of a bowlder of granitoid gneiss or 
gneissoid granite in the Halifax bard- 
bed coal, with a note by T. G. Bonney. 

British Assoc. Adv. Science, Report of 
fifty-eighth meeting, pp. 661-662, | p. 1889. 

Kotice of its occurrence and statement in 
regard to horizon, with a petrographio note 
by T. G. Bonney. 

SPENCER, J. W. Notes upon warping 
of the earth's crust in relation to the 
origin of the basins of the Great Lakes. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 168-171. 1887. 

Discasses the contonr of the bed of the 
preglacial Mississippi firom bore-hole records 
and finds evidence of an anticlinal deforma- 
tion having its axis near Little Rock and 
traceable eastward, past lakes Erie and 
Ontai'io, injrolving their terraces as shown by 
Gilbert The age of the uplift is discussed 
from evidence presented by drainage features 
in the Mississippi valley region and the ter- 
races of the Great Lakes. 

— - A landslide at Brantford, Ontario, 
illustrating the effects of thrusts upon 
yielding strata. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 267-269. 1887. 

Describes and figures the resulting series 
of folds and discusses the cause of the move- 
ment. 

— Age of the Niagara River. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 269-270. 1887. 

Discusses evidence in regard to the pre- 
glacial outlet of Lake Erie in connection with 
t^e St David's valley theory. 



8PBNCER, J. W.— Continued. 
Hnmmoeks and bowlders of decom- 
position in southeastern MisBoori. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 366-387. 1887. 

Describes furrowed and rounded aarfaoes 
of red granulitea and compares the results 
with those produced by glaoiation. 

Am. NaturalUt, voL 21. pp. 917-92L 1887. 

Abstracts, Am. Groologist, voL 1, pp. 190-121. 
f p., 1888; Am. Assoc. Adv. Scienco, Froc., 
. voL 36, p. 220, i p., 1888. 

Sand bowlders, in the drifts, or sub- 



aqueous origin of the drift, in central 
Missouri. 

Beseribes the drift and its contained bowl- 
der-shaped masses of stratified sand. Dis- 
cusses the origin of these "bowlders," which 
are regarded as frozen masses deposited with 
the drift and indicative of its subaqneoas 
origin. Calls attention to similar occurrences 
elsewhere and gives analysis of drift clay. 

— Notes upon the theory of glacial 
motion. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc.,v<^. 86, p. 
320,4 p. 1888. 

S6sum6 of evidence indlcnidng the internal 
conditions of glacial movement. 

— Lake beaches of Ann Arbor. 

Am. Geologist, voL 2, p. 62, | p. 1888. 
Expression of opinion in regard to their ori- 
gin and relations. 

— Notes on the drift north of Lake 
Superior. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 22. pp. 344-^5. 1888. 

Science, voL 11, pp. 138-139, | coL 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to Philosophical 
Society of Washington. 

Relations of clays, moraine-like ridges at 
head of Georgian Bay, zona of drift ridges 
from Georgian Bay to Lake Ontario, ridges at 
Bellville. and dkection of striation in Ottawa 
valley and westward to Lake Superior. 

— The St. Lawrence basin and the 
Great Lakes. [Abstract.] 

Canadian Becord Science, voL 8, pp. 232- 
235. 1888. 

Science, voL 12, pp. 99-100, | p. 1888. 

Sci. Am. Supt., vol. 26, pp. 10671-10672, 1 col. 
Folio. No. 668. 1888. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 34(^-348. 1888. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc, voL 37, 
pp. 197-199. 1889. 

Am. NatnraUst, voL 38, pp. 491-494. 1889. 

Sketch of the history of the Great Lakes, 
their drainage and the nature of the attendant 
crustal deformation of the region, discussion 
of the origin of their basins and statement of 
objections to the theory of glacial erosion and 
damming. 

— Qlacial erosion in Norway and in 
high latitudes. 



DJkBT(»r.J 



BECOBD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889 



149 



SPBNCBR, J. W.— Continued. 

Canada, Roj. Soo., Trans., vol. 5, section 
lv,pp.8fr-98. 1888. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 22, pp. 218-231. 1888. 

Abstaract, Am. Assoc. Adr. Science, Proc., 
vol. 36, pp. 218-220. 188a 

AlMtraot and review, Am. G-eologist, vol. 
2, pp. 432-433. 1888. 

Description of rel&tions at the bases of some 
Norwegian glaciers, reference to the mechan- 
ical resalts of ice action at various Arctic 
looalitieB, and discussion of conditions and 
effects of glacial erosion. 

*— The Iroquois beaoh — a chapter in 
the history of Lake Ontario. 

Science, voL 11, p. 40, | p. 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to Washington 
Philosophical Society. 

Gives an account of the extent, deformation, 
and relations of the uppermost beach of a 
glacial lake for which the name Lake War- 
ren is suggested and of which Lake Ontario 
is the shrunken remains. 

Economic geological survey in Geor- 
gia and Alabama through the belt 
traversed by the Macon and Birming- 
ham Railway, 86 pages, map, pi. Athens. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 5, p. 105, i p. 
1800. 

Includes a general description of salient 
geologic features of formations from Archean 
to Carboniferous and of the Pleistocene, and 
an account of the ores, coals, limisstones, and 
soils of the region. 

On glacial erosion. 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 208-212. 1880. 

Sefers to characteristics of glaciation in 
Norway and elsewhere, and phenomena of ice 
action in Hudson Bay. 

STANTON, T. W. Paleontological 
notes. 

Colorado, Sci. Soc., Proc, vol. 2, pp. 181- 
187. 1888. 

Description of outcrops and members of 
and list of fossils from exposures of Colorado 
group near Boulder. 

Btateii Island, Natural Science Asso- 
ciation, Proceedings, 1887. 

Fossils in drift of Staten Island, 

Gratacap. 
Nature and origin of Staten Island 

serpentines, Gratacap. 
Well at Clifton, Hollick. 

1888. 

Leaf impressions in sandstone in 

drift, Hollick. 
Notes on the modified drift, Britton. 



Staten Island, Natural Science Asso- 
ciation, Proceedings, 1889— Cont'd. 
Cretaceous at Grassmere Station, 

Staten Island, Britton. 
Fossiliferous sandstones in clays, 

Hollick. 
Oriskany bowlder on Staten Island, 

Gratacap. 
Outcrops of Cretaceous and Triossic, 

Britton. 
Triassic shale outcrops, Hollick. 
Yellow gravel formation, Britton. 

STEVENSON, J. J. A geological 
reconnaissance of Bland, Giles, Wythe, 
and portions of Pulaski and Montgom- 
ery counties of Virginia. 

Am. Phil. Soc, Proc, voL 24, pp. 61-108, 
map, 2 plates. No. 125. 1887. 

Describes and discusses the stractaral rela- 
tions, stratigraphy, and areal distribution of 
the geolo^o groups from the Cambrian to the 
lower Carboniferous. Accompanied by a 
colored geologic map and two plates of struc- 
tural sections. 

• 

Notes on the surface geology of 



southwest Virginia. 

Am. Phil. Soc, Proc, voL 24, pp. 172-178. 
Ncl25. 1887. 

Describes the drainage systems and topo- 
graphic features of the region, the two "ero- 
sion planes" along the New River, and others 
on and near the Clinch and Holston rivers, 
and the high beaches and fragmentary plains 
of the '* Fhfct top " country of West Virginia. 
Discusses the history of the terraces and 
planes, the origin of their materials, the es- 
tablishment of the drainage and its relation 
to the faults, flexures, and rock texture, the 
former eastward extent of the coal- measure 
• rocks, and the amount of erosion and its rela- 
tion to the faults. 

— The faults of southwest Virginia. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 33, pp. 262-270. 
1887. 

Description of their relations and discussion 
of their history. 

— Notes on the lower Carboniferons 



groups aloDg the easterly side of the 
Appalachian area in Pennsylvania and 
Virginia. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 37-44. 
1887. 

Describes the stratigraphy of the Umbral 
and Vespertine, and discusses the bearing of 
the variations in the thickness and composi- 
tion on the position of the shore lines, and 
conditions of the deposition, and their equiva- 
lency with the sub- Carboniferous members of 
the Mississippi valley. 



150 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BUII..7BL 



STEVENSON, J. J.—Coutinaed. 

Report of the aaboommittee on upper 

Paleozoic (CarboDlo). 

International Oongress of Goologistii, Am. 
Oommittee Beports, 1888, D, pp. 11. 

▲m. aoologiat, rol. 2, pp. 246-256. 1888. 

Diacouion of the range, eqalvaleney, cor- 
relation, and taxonomy of the formationa con- 
stituting the Carbonic. 

— The Mesozoic rocks of soathem Col- 
orado and northern New Mexico. 

Am. (Zoologist, vol. 3, pp. 391-397. 1889. 

Snmmary of distribution and oharacter- 
iatica of the several formations, and discus- 
sion of their extent, range, and stratigraphio 
position. 

STOCKBRIDQE, Horace E. Rocks and 
soils; their origin, composition, and 
characteristics, 231) pages. New York, 

1889. 

Chapters on geologic history of the earth, 
rock composition and d ecumxK>8itioD, and the 
agencies and products of rook disintegration. 

STONE, George H. A living glacier on 
Hague's Peak, Colorado. 

Science, vol. 10, pp. 153-154. 1887. 
Also de8cril>e8 series of moraines of ancient 
glaciers in the same basin and its vicinity. 

Terminal moraines in Maine. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 8d series, toL 33, pp. 878-385. 
1887. 



STONE, George H.— Continued. 

Describes morainic drifts on the Andros- 
coggin at Seadfleld Tillage, Swan Island, 
Sabattisville, Machias, and Waldoboro. 
Discusses the history of some of the deposits, 
especially of those in the Hedomao Biyer 
region. 

[Gravels aod osar of Maine. J See 

CHAMBBRLIN, T. C. Report di vis- 
ion of glacial geology. 

STRBERUWITZ, W. H. Coal in 
Texas. 

Oeol. and Sol. BnlL, voL 1, 1^ ooL 40. 
Feb., 1888. 

Includes references to some of the Carbon- 
iferous outcrops. 

Report of Geologist for western 

Texas. 

Texas, Greol. and Mineralogical Surrey, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 31-43. 1889. 

Abstract, Geol. and Sci. Bull., toL1,Nov., 
1888, I col. 40. . 

Itinerary notes of a geologic trip from El 
Paso to Fort Davis. 

STUB, D. Die Lnnzer (Lettenkohlen) 
flora in der ''older mesozoic beds of 
the coal field of eastern Virginia." 

Vienna, k. k. Geol. Reichsanstalt, Verhand- 
iungen, 1888, pp. 20 3 1888. 

Kotseen. 



T. 



T AIT, J. L. [Report.] 

Texas, Geol. and Mineralogical Surrey, 
First Report, 1888, pp. 64-60. 1888. 

Kotes on principal geologic features and 
economic minerals of Edwards, Medina, At- 
ascosa, Bexar, Frio, and La Salle counties. 

Gas \7 ell at San Antonio. 

Geol. and Sci. Bull., voL 1, Feb., 1889, | col. 
Becord of material passed through in a 373- 
foot welL 

TAYLOR, W. Edgar. Geology in our 
preparatory schools. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 316-321. 1888. 
Gives a brief outline for laboratory and 
field work in geology. 

Tennessee, analyses of ores, Flbming. 

coal, ASHBURNBR. 

base of Paleozoic in Doe River gorge, 

Britton. 
Bays Mountains, Willis. 

oaves, KlNGSLBY. 

East Tennessee minerals, Cowlan. 



Tennessee — Continued. 

marbles of Hawkins County, Willis. 
mineral resources, Proctor. 
western iron belt, Killbbrbw. 
round about Asheville, Willis. 

Tertiary. 
Aldbama, Tuscaloosa, Tombigbee, and 
Alabama rivers, Smith and John- 
son. McGbb. 
old Tertiary fauna, Mbtbr. 

ArkansaSf west central, CoMSTOCf. 
equivalence in time of marine and in- 
tra-continental Tertiarie.s, Hil- 

GARD. 

Neozoic geology. Hill, R. T. 
relations of upper Cretaceous, Hill, 
R. T. 

California^ Bbcker. Dutton. Bow- 
ers. GrOODYEAR. IRBLAN. JaCK- 

SON. Weber. Schuster. Lb 
CONTE. White, C. A. Lindgrbn. 



DAHTOM.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1^87 TO 1889. 



151 



Tertiary — Continued. 
California — Cont i nued. 
catalogues of fossils, Cooper. 
coast islands and coast region, Lb 

CONTB. 

origin of gold deposits near Oaray, 
Endlich. 

southern CalLforuia, Hawks. 

siliciiied wood, Friedrich. 
Canada, Belly River, Cope. 

Cretaceous floras of the Northwest, 
Dawson, J. W. 

Eocene faunsB, Dawson, J. W. 

Laramie flora, Ward. 

northern Alberta, etc., Tyrrell. 

northern part of the Dominion, Daw- 
son, G. M. 

relations of British American plants, 
Drummond. 

woods and plants from western Cali- 
fornia, Dawson, J. W. 

Yukon region, Dawson, G. M. 
Colorado f age of Denver formation, 
Cope. 

coal fleld of Crested Butte, Lakes. 

coals, Newberry. 

Denver formation. Cross. 

Denver region, Eldridge. 

Dinosauria of the Denver beds. Can- 
non. 

eruptives of Spanish Peaks region. 
Hills. 

iield for original work in Rocky 
Mountains, Hills. 

fossil plants from Golden, Lesque- 
reux. 

geology of ^Colorado ore deposits. 
Lakes. 

Huerfano River basin, Hills. 

Laramie flora, Ward. 

mountain upthrusts, Uinta, etc., 
White, C. A. 

northwestern coal region, Hewitt. 

oil fields of Fremont County, Ihlseng. 

Ouray County, Kedzie. 

San Juan region, Ihlseng. 

upper Eocene lacustrine formations, 
Scott. 

vertebrate fauna of the Puerco epoch. 
Cope. 
Dakota, Black Hills region. Carpen- 
ter. Crosby. 
Florida, Johnson. Dall. Heilprin. 

geologic survey, Kost. 

intermediate Pliocene fauna. Cope. 



Tertiary — Continued. 
Florida — Continued. 
Miocene, Langdon. 
Ollgocene, Johnson. 
well at San Augustine, Eennish. 
west coast an^ Okeechobee wilder- 
ness, Heilprin. 
Idaho, volcanic dusts, analysis, Whit- 
field, J. E. 
Kansas, geology of Kansas, lecture, 
Hay, R. 
history of geologic work. Hay and 

Thompson. 
report on geology, Hay. 
nickel ore, Logan County, Snow. 
southwestern Kansas, St. John. 
Kentucky, Jackson Purchase region, 
Loughridge. 
western Kentucky, Proctor. 
Louisiana, iron ores, analyses, RiGGS. 
iron region of northern Louisiana, 

Johnson. 
Petite Anse salt deposits, Bolton. 

POMEROY. 

Maryland, Cretaceous in Anne Arundel 
and Prince George's counties, 
Clark. 

Cretaceous of southwestern Mary- 
land, Bryan. 

Eocene and its associates, Uhler. 

southern counties, Clark. 

three formations of the middle Atlan- 
tic slope, McGee. 
Massachusetts, Martha's Vineyardj Sha- 

LER. 

Mexico, Baja California, Lindgren. 

Sonora earthquake, Goodfellow. 

valley of Mexico, Chism. 
Mississippi, Grand Gulf formation, 
Johnson. 

flora, Meyer. 

iron ores, Brainerd. 
Montana, Iron Butte, Calvin. 

volcanic dusts, analyses, Whitfield, 
J. E. 
Nebraska, coals, Ashburner. 

quartzite. Hicks. Todd. 

soils. Hicks. 
New Jersey, artesian wells, Cook. * 

boring at Atlantic City, Woolman. 

diatoms in well at Atlantic City, 
King. 

geologic map, Cook. 

map of vicinity of New York city, 
Martin. 



162 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75. 



Tertiaxy — Con tiu aed. 
New t/erM^— CoDtlnued. 
Miocene mollnsea, Hbilprik. 
•olations of upper OretaoeouSy Hill, 

R.T. 
upper marl'bed, Cqok. Whitfield. 
yellov gravels, Brittom. 
New Mexico, northeastern, Dutton. 
vertebrate faona of Pnerco epoch, 

COKB. 

New York J Long Island, Dana, J. D. 
map of vicinity of New York City, 
Martin. 
New Zealand, copper mines, Hbnrich. 

Nomenclature and classijicaUon, classifi- 
cation of post-Cretaceous deposits, 
Heilprin. 

equivalence of Senonian and Eocene, 
Ward. 

equivalence in time of marine and 
intra-continental Tertiaries, Uil- 

OARD. 

fannal and floral relations of western 

Tertiaries, White, C. A. 
North American eastern Tertiary, 

Meyer. 
reports on Cenozoic (interior), Cope. 
report on Cenozoic ^marine), Smith, 

E. A. Aldrich. Cope. Dall. 

Heilprin. Hilgard. Le Conte. 

Newberry. Winchell, A. 
relations of Laramie to Eocene, 

White, C. A. 
explorations in Florida, Heilprin. 

Oregon, intermediate Pliocene fauna, 
Cope. 
western Oregon, Dutton. Lang. 
Pennsylvania, history of rivers and val- 
leys, Davis, W. M. 
South America, Brazil, monazite in rocks, 
Derby, 
Brazil, SergipeAlagods basin, Bran- 

NER. 

Texas, eastern, Penrose. 
geology of Texas, Hill, R. T. 
Colorado River region, Hill, R. T. 
Nacogdoches oil field, Domble. 
Neozoic geology, Hill, R. T. 
relations of upper Cretaceous, Hill, 

R.T. 
Shumard on Texas geology. Hill, 

R. T. 
South central Texas, Jermy. 
southern Texas, Tait. 
western Texas, Hill, R. T. 



Tertiary — Continued. 

Utah, Laramie, White, C. A. 
uppet Eocene lacustrine formations, 
Scott. 
Virginia, three formations of middle 

Atlantic slope, McGeb. 
Wyoming, Brontops robustns. Marsh. 
geologic history of Yellowstone Park, 

Hague. 
Laramie, Ward. Whitb, C. A. 
upper Eocene lacustrine formations, 
Scott. 

Texas, Geological and Mineralogioal 
Survey, First Report, 1888. 
Western Texas, Strberuwitz. 
Northern Texas, Cummins. 
Eastern Texas, Penrose. 
South central Texas, Jermy. Tait. 
San Saba County, Gregg. 

Texas, Archean, H^brod. Hill, B. T. 
Jermy. Strberuwitz. 
age of coal in Rio Grande region. 

White, C. A. 
age of uppermost Cretaceous, ROmer. 
Carboniferous, Cummins. 
Cretaceous and its equiyalency. 

White, C. A. 
Cretaceous river bed, Hays County, 

Pond. 
building stones of eastern Texas, 

Penrose. 
Burnet County, Walker. 
coal, Ashburner. 
cross-timbers. Hill, R. T. 
drift at Gainesville, Ragsdalb. 
eastern Texas, Penrose. 
events in North American Cretaceous 

history. Hill, R. T. 
geology of western Texas, Hill, R. T. 
geologic story of Colorado River, 

Hill, R. T. 
gas well at San Antonio, Tait. 
Grimes County, R. G. 
Haldeman Countyj J. T. W. 
Hill on Cretaceous, Cope. 
lower Cretaceous of the Southwest, 

White, C. A. 
iron regions of eastern Texas, John- 
son. 
Neozoic geology, Hill, R. T. 
new Cretaceous fossils. Hill, R. T. 
Nacogdoches oil field, Dumblb. 
northern Texas, Cummins. 
occurrence of Macraster Texanus, 

Hill, R. T. 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



153 



Texas — Continued. 

origin of certain Cretaoeous lime- 

- stones, Hill, R. T. 
original locality of Gryphtea Pitcheri, 

Marcou. 
present condition of knowledge of 

geology, Hill, R. T. 
paleontology of Cretaceous, Hill, 

R. T. 
paleozoic of central Texas, Walcott. 
Permian, Hill, R. T. White, C. A. 
Permian in Baylor, Archer, and 

Wichita connties, White, C. A. 
relations of uppermost Cretaceons, 

Hill, R. T. 
relations of Laramie, White, C. A. 
Rio Grande valley, Owen. 
Shumard on western Texas, Hill,R.T. 
south central Texas, Jermy. Owen. 
southern Texas, Tait. 
San Saba County, Gregg. 
story of Colorado River,* Hill, R. T. 
Tertiary, Cope. 
Texas section of Cretaceous, Hill, 

R.T. 
Trinity formation, Hill, R. T. 
western Texas, Hill, R. T. Streeru- 

WITZ. 

Texas, University o^ School of Geol- 
ogy, Circular No. 1, Hill, R. T. 

THOMPSON, A. H. History of geologic 
studies in Kansas. See HAY, Rohert, 
and. 

[THOMPSON, M.] Preface. 

Indiana, Department of G-eol. and Nat. 
Hiat, Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 5-9. 1886. 

General statemeQts in regard to the " Wa- 
bash Arch," and its relation to the drainage 
and drift phenomena. 

[ ] Compendium of the geology and 

mineralogy of Indiana. 

Indiana, Department of Geol, and Nat. 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 10-25. 
1886. 

General sketch of the areal, stractaral, and 
stratigraphic geology. 

[ ] Indiana building stone. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 26-33. 1886. 

Description of the Oolitic limestone, its 
distribntion, origin, composition, etc., aiid of 
acme localities of lower coal- measure sand- 
stones. 

I ] The clays of Indiana. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 34-10. 1886. 



[THOMPSON, M.]-Coutiaued. 

Describes some well known clay deposits 
and the ooal-measnre days of Indiana. Dis- 
cnsses the origin of kaolin. 

[ ] Indiana chalk heds. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 

Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 41-i3. 1886. 

Description of chalky marls in the drift 
deposits, and discussion of their origin. 

[ ] Glacial deposits of ludiana. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 44-56. 1886. 

Discussion of glacial action, account of the 
glacial period, and a general description of 
the distribution, topography, structure, con- 
stituents, and relations of the drift of the 
State. 

[ ] A terminal moraine in central In- 
diana. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist. , Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 57-60. 1886. 
Greneral desoiiption of the course, topog- 
raphy, and structure of an irregular series of 
moraines, and discussion of its relations to 
some drainage features, terraces, and the up- 
lift of the " Wabash Arch." 

[ ] A geological survey of Clinton 

County. 

Indiana, Department of Geol.^ and Nat. 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 154-159. 
1886. 

Describes morainal drift, discusses the prob- 
able boundaries of some of the formations 
underlying the drift, and calls attention to 
evidence of ancient stream channels. 

[ ] Marshall County. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 177-182. 
1886. 

Description of its glacial drift, terrace, nnd 
sand deposits. Discusses the origin of some 
drainage features and bowlder deposits. 

[ ] A geological survey of Starke 

County. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 221-227. 
1886. 

Description of its drift and "lake sand" 
deposits. 

[ ] Natural gas. 

» 
Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 

Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 314-333. 
1886. 

Discusses the genesis of gas and its occur- 
rence in Indiana. Gives records of a number 
of bore holes. 

and LEE, S. £. Maxinkuckee. 

Indiana, Department of Geol. and Nat. 
Hist., Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 18*2-186. 
1886. 



154 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bvUm 78. 



THOMPSON, M. and LEE, S. E.— 
CoDtinaed. 

Aocoafit of bore holes in clay, grftvel, and 
sand in the vicinity of this lake. 

THOMSON, James. The geology of the 
Territory of Idaho, U. S., and the sil- ' 
ver lode of Atlanta. 

Glasgow, Geol. Soc., Trans., voL 8, pp. 173- - 
177. 1886. 

Account of a trip from Utah to Atlanta 
City. Brief statements in regard to i-elations 
of ernptives, and the metamorphio rocks of 
the Atlanta region. 

TIFF ANT, A. S. Tbe artesian well at 
City Park, Davenport, Iowa. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 3, pp. 117-118. 1889. 
Sci. Am.,Snpt.,vol.27,p. 11077. Folio. No. 
693. 1889. 

Becord of 1,797-foot well. Calls attention to 
unconformity at summit of the Corniferous. 

TIGHT, W. G. Geology and lithology 
of M ic hip i CO ten Bay. See HER- 
RICK, C. L., TIGHT, W. G., and 
JONES, H. L. 

TODD, J. E. Further notes on ** a green 
quartzite from Nebraska.'' 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 59-60. 1889. 
Discusses limits and origin of the drifts. Re- 
fers to various localities of the quartzite in Ne- 
hraska and Dakota, its altitudes, dip, and age. 

Evidence that Lake Cheyenne con- 

iinned till the ice age. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adr. Science, Proc, vol. 37, pp. 
202-203, i p. 1889. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, pp. 436-437, i p. 
1889. 

Statement in regard to relations of some of 
its later deposits lo the glacial drifts, and dis- 
cussion of its bearing on the history of the 
Missouri. 

The terraces of the Missonri. [Ab- 
stract.] 1889. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc., vol. 37, pp. 
203-205. 1889. 

Statements in regard to their elevations, ex- 
tent, slope, deposits, and correlation, with 
events in glacial history. 

[Glacial geology in Nebraska and 



Dakota.] See CHAMBERLIN, J. C. 

Report, Glacial Division. 

TOXJLA, F. Der Yellowstone-National- 
park, der vnlkanische Ansbrnch anf 
NeuSeeland nnd dasgeyser-phanomen. 
ss. 79, abb. 5. Wien. 
Not seen. 

Geologische forschungsergebnisse 

aus dem Flussgebiet des Colorado, ss. 

51, abb. 11. Wien. 
Not seen. 



TURNER, Lncien. Physical and zoo- 
logical character of the Ungava dis- 
trict, Labrador. 

Canada, Roy. Soc, Trans., voL 5, section 
IV, pp. 79-83. 40. 1888. 

includes brief references to Lanrentian 
gneisses, and the occurrence of Hnronian 
and Silurian, evidence of glaciation and its 
direction, bowlder beds, and terraces. 

TTRRELL, J. B. Report on a part of 
northern Alberta and portions of adja- 
cent districts of Assiniboia and Sas- 
katchewan, embracing the conutry 
lying south of the north Saskatchewan 
River and north of latitude 51° 6', be- 
tween longitude 110° and 115° 15' west. 

Canada, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, Re- 
port, 1886, part E, pp. 1-152, pis. Maps 3 and 
4 in Atlas. 1887. 

Abstracts, ibid., part A, pp. 9-11 ; Geol. 
Magazine, 3d decade, vol. 5, pp. 308-373. 
1888. 

Description of Cretaceous, Tertiary, and 
Quatenary, and discussion of history and re- 
lations of some of the deposits and ancient 
drainage features. Accompanied by a colored 
geologic map. 

On the sup erficial geology of the 

central plateau of northwestern Can- 
ada. [Abstract.] 

Nature, vol. 39, p. 95, 24 lines. 1888. 

Kead to Geol(^ical Society. Brief reference 
to the occurrences and characteristics of the 
several drift features. 

Gypsum deposits in northern Mani- 



toba. 

Canadian Record Science, vol. S, pp. 353- 
860. 1889. 

Account of their occurrence and oharaoter- 
tics, and discassfon of their age and origin. 

XJHLER, P. R. The Albirupean forma- 
tion, and its nearest relatives in Mary- 
land. 

Am. Phil. Soc, Froc, vol. 25, pp. 42-53, No. 
127. 1888. 

Bevlewby Carvill Lewis, ib., pp. 53-54; and 
A. Heilprin, lb., p. 54, | p. 

Description of sands, clays, sandstones, 
quartzites, etc., lying between the Potomac 
formation and the Cretaceous green-sands, 
and discussion of their equivalency and strati- 
graphic relations. 

Observations on the Eocene Tertiary, 

and its Cretaceous associates in the 
State of Maryland. 

Maryland Acad. Sci., Trans., 1888, pp. 11- 
32. 1888. 

Desciiption of distribution, characteristics, 
paleontology, etc., of the Cretaceous uid 



BABTON.] 



BECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



155 



TTRLER; p. R.— Continned. 

Eocene, and discussions of the relations and 
correlation of some portions of the latter. 

*- — Additions to observations on the 
Cretaceous and Eocene formations of 
Maryland. 

Maryland Acad. Sci., Trans., 1888| pp.45- 
61. ri880.] 

An account of its characteristics, fossils, and 
relations at various localities. 



, E. O. A correlation of the 
lower Silurian horizons of Tennessee, 
and of the Ohio and Mississippi valleys 
^yr'ith those of New York and Canada. 

Am. aeologist, vol. 1, pp. 100-110, 17^190, 
305-315; voL 2, pp. 30-44 (to be continued). 
1888. 

Description of paleontology, stratigraphy, 
and structure of the lower Silurian of the 
Ohio Valley. 

On Sceptropora, a new genus of 
Bryozoa, with remarks on Helipora 
Hally and other genera of that type. 

Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 228-234. 1888. 

Includes brief reference to the equivalency 
of the lower Silurian in northern Illinois and 
Stony Mountain, Manitoba. 

"CJnited States Oeological Survey, 
Bulletins Nos. 34 to 54. 

Relations of Laramie molluscan 
fauna. White, C. A. 

Peridotites of Elliott County, Ken- 
tucky, DiLLER. » 

Beaches and deltas of glacial Lake 
Agassiz, Upham. 

Changes in river courses in Washing- 
ton, Willis. 

Fossil faunas of the upper Devonian, 
Genesee section, Williams, H. S. 

Gneiss-dunyte contacts of Corundum 
Hill, North Carolina, Chatarp. 

Miscellaneous analyses, Chatard. 
Clarke, F. W. Riggs. Whit- 
field, J. E. 

Tertiary and Cretaceous of Tusca- 
loosa, Tombigbee, ana Alabama 
rivers, Smith, E. A., and Johnson. 
McGeb. 

Bibliography of North American ge- 
ology for 1886, Darton. 

Present condition of knowledge of 
geology of Texas, Hill, R. T. 

Nature and origin of deposits of phos- 
phate of lime, Penrose. Shale r. 

Invertebrate fossils from Pacific 
coast, White, C. A. 



United States Geological Survey, 
Bulletins No. 34 to 54— Continued. 
Form and position of sea level. Wood- 
ward. 
Subaerial decay of rocks, Russeli^ 

I. C. 
Geology of Nantucket, Shaler. 

Sixth Annual Report. 

Atlantic coast division, Shaler. 
Division of Mesozoic invertebrates, 

White, C. A. 
Division of Paleozoic invertebrates^ 

Walcott. 
Division of the Pacific, Becker. 
Driftless area, Chamberlin and 

Salisbury. 
Glacial division, Chamberlin, T. C. 
Lake Superior division, Irving. 
Montana division, Hayden. 
Mount Taylor and Zufli plateau, 

DUTTON. 

Report, McGee. 

Rocky Mountain division, Emmons. 
Sea-coast swamps, Shaler. 
Synopsis of flora of Laramie, Ward. 
Yellowstone Park division, Hague. 

Seventh Annual Report. 



Atlantic coast division, Shaler. 
Lake Superior division, Irving. 
Division of glacial geology, Cham- 
berlin. 
Montana division, Hayden. 
California division, Becker. 
Division of volcanic geology, DuT- 

TON. 

Potomac division, McGee. 
Paleozoic invertebrate paleontology, 

Walcott. 
Mesozoic invertebrate paleontology. 

White, C. A. 
Division of paleobotany. Ward. 
Rock-scorings of the great ice inva- 
sions, Chamberlin. 
Obsidian cliff, Yellowstone Park,^ 

Iddings. 
Geology of Martha's Vineyard, 

Shaler. 
Classification of early Cambrian and 

pre-Cambrian, Irving. 
Structure of Trias, of Connecticut 

valley, Davis. 
Geology of head of Chesapeake Bay, 

McGee. 

— Mineral Hesources, 1887. 
Rock from Nickel Mountain, Oregon, 
MbbrilL) G. p. 



156 



RECORD OF OEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



tBULUTS. 



United States Geological Survey, 
Mineral ResouroeB^ 1887~Cont'd. 

Coal, ASHBURNBB. 

Infasorial earth, Dat. 
Monograph No. 13. 

Geology of qnioksilver deposits of 
the Pacific slope, Bbckbb. 

Monograph No. 14. 



Fossil fishes and fossil plants of the 
Triassic rooks of New Jersey and 
the CoDneotiont valley, Nkw- 

BKRBT. 

United States National Museum, Pro- 
ceedingSy voL 11. 
Serpentine of Montville, New Jer- 
sey, Merrill. 
Peridotite from Little Deer Island, 

Maine, Merrill. 
Measuring thickness of inclined 
strata, Walcott. 

United States* Report: The iron 
regions of northern Louisiana and 
eastern Texas, Johnson. 

UPHAM, Warren. The upper beaches 
and deltas of the glacial Lake A.gassiz. 
^ U. S. Oeol. Surrey, Bull. , voL 6, pp. 380-470, 
plate. Ko.39. 1887. 

Abstracts, Science, voL 10, pp. 103-104, 
1887 ; Am. aeologiftt, vol. 1, pp. 64-65, | p., 
1888 ; Popular Science Monthly, yol. 32, p. 
420, i col., 1888. 

Introductory sketch of the lake, its beaches, 
bed, outlet* northern barrier, and depth, and 
a discussion of the cause and sisnifloance of 
the slope of its shore lines. Describes in de- 
tail t'ue beaches and their relations to the 
drifts, drainage, and topography. Incideot- 
ally remarks on some features of the drift and 
on the geology of Pembina Mountain and vi- 
cinity. 

Prof. Henry Carvill Lewis and his 

work in glacial geology. 

Am. aeologiftt, vol. 2, pp. 871-379. 1888. 

Beferences to results of his studies of the 
terminal moraine in eastern United States and 
drifts ot Great Britain. List of papers. 

The recession of the ice sheet in 

Minnesota in its relation to the gravel 
deposits overlying thn qnartz imple- 
ments fonnd by Miss Babbitt at Little 
Falls, Minnesota. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc, vol. 23, pp. 
436-447. 1888. 

Description of the relations of the contain- 
ing gravels and a sketch of the history of the 
ioe-sheet recession in the Minnesota region. 



UPHAM, Warren— Contion^i 

The geology of Carver and Scott 

^ counties. 

Mimieaota, Oeology of, Final Report, voL 
2; pp. 102-147, map. 1888. 

Description of Cambrian and Cretaoeons 
areas and the drifts. Artesian well reooids ; 
tenaoes. Discussion of the relatfons and 
origin of some of the drifts, and the history 
of some ancient drainage featuTee. Aooom- 
panied by a colored geologic map. 

The geology of Sibley and Nicollet 

counties. 

Minnesota, Oeology of, Final Rqport, voL 
2,pp.l4»-179, map. 1888. 

Descriptions of drifts, terraces and out- 
crops of Arohean, Cambrian, and Cretaceous. 
Discussion of equivalency of some of the 
Cambrian members and the relation and ori- 
gin of some of the drifts. Accompanied by 
a colored geologic map. 



— The geology of McLeod Connty. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 180-189. Map. 188& 

Description of the drifts, atad discussion of 
the relations and origin of some of their fea- 
tures. Accompanied 1^ a colored geologic 
map. 

— The geology of Renville Connty. 

Minnesota, Geology of, Final Report, ti^ 
2, pp. 190-204. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts, Archean, Cretaceous, 
terraces, and Interglacial forest bed. Accom- 
panied by a colored geologic map. 

— The geology of Swift and Chippewa 
counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 205-219. Hiap. 1888. 

Description of drifts, Arohean outcrops, 
buried moraine, preglacial drainage channels, 
and terraces. Accompanied by a colored 
geologic map. 

— The geology of Kandiyohi and 
Meeker counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, vd. 
2, pp. 220-242. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts, and sketches of glacial 
history. Accompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

— The geology of Wright Connty. 

Minnesota, Geology of, Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 243-263. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts and doubtful Creta- 
ceous outcrops. Discussions of the relations 
of some of the drifts, and some features of 
glacial history. Accompanied by a cohwed 
geologic map. 

— The geology of Chisago, Isanti, and 
Anoka counties. 



DABTOH.J 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



157 



T7PHAM, Warren—Continaed. 

Minnesota, Greologj of, Final Beport, voL 
2,pp.399-4?5. ^p. 1888. 

Description of drifts, terraces, and of out- 
crops of traps, St. Croix sandstone, lower 
niagnesian limestone, and Treuton limestone. 
Disoasftion of the relations and origin of some 
of the drifts. Accompanied by a colored 
geologic map. 

The geology of Benton and Sher- 
burne coanties. 

Blinnesota, Geology of, Final Report, vol. 
8, pp. 426-444. Map. 1888. 

Description of Archean areas, trap dikes, 
and drifts. Discusses relations of some of 
the drifts. Accompanied by a colored geo- 
logic map. 

The geology of Steams County. 

Minnesota, G-eology of, Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 445-470. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts, Archean and Creta- 
ceous, and sketch of glacial history. Accom- 
panied by a colored geologic map. 

The geology of Donglas and Pope 

conntiee. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 471-498. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts. References to glacial 
history indicated by some of the features, re- 
lations of the drifts, and preglacial topo- 
graphic features ; presence of Cretaceous. 
Accompanied by a colored geologic map. 

- — The geology of Grant and Stevens 
counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of, Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 499-510. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts and beaches of glacial 
Lake Agassis. Accompanied by a colored 
geologic map. 

- — The geology of Wilkins and Traverse 
counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, vol. 
2,pp.511-.533. Map. 1888. 

Description of shore phenomena, and sketch 
of history of glacial Lake Agassiz. Reference 
to underlying Cretaceous found in well at 
Fargo. Accompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

The geology of Ottertail County. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, voL 
2,pp.684-66L Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts and beaches of Lake 
Agassiz. Discussion of nature of underlying 
rocks, and the origins of some of the drift 
deposits. Accompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

The geology of Wadena and Todd 

counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 562-579. Map. 1888. 



UPHAM, Warren— Continued. 

Description of drifts* Archean, and diorite. 
Discussion of the nature and sequence of 
some of the glacial phenomena. Accompa- 
nied by a colored geologic map. 

The geology of Crow Wing and Mor- 
rison counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, vol.- 
2, pp. 580-611. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts, Archean, staurolitio 
and mica schists, and Cretaceous. Discusses 
origin of some of tlie drift materials. Some 
copies accompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

The geology of Mille Lacs and Kan- 
abec counties. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 612-628. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts, and Archean and 
Potsdam outcrops. Accompanied by a colored 
geologic map. 

The geology of Pine County. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 629-645. Map. 1888. 

Description of 1 drifts, Archean, Kewee- 
naw an, and Cambrian outcrops, and ancient 
outlet of Lake Superior. Accompanied by a 
colored geologic map.' 

The geology of Becker County. 

Minnesota, Geology of, Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 646-655. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts, and discussion of ex- 
tent and relation of underlying rocks. Ac- 
companied by colored geologic map. 

The geology of Clay County. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 656-671. Map. 1888. 

Description of drifts and shore phenomena 
of glacial Lake Agassis. References to pre- 
glacial topography, and well at Fargo into 
supposed Cretaceous strata. Accompanied 
by a colored geologic map. 

Glaciation of mountains in New Eng- 
land and New York. 

Am. Geologist, voL 4, pp. 165-174, 206-216. 
1889. 

Appalachla, voL 5, pp. 291-312. 1889. 

Discusses the extent, thickness, direction 
of movement, and action on elevated regions 
of the great ice caps of the glacial period. 

Ascents of Camel's Hump and Lin- 
coln Mountain, Vermont. 

Appalachla, voL 5, pp. 319-326. 1889. 

Includes some brief references to the char- 
acteristics of the Tocka, evidences of glacia- 
tion, and glacial drifts. 

Marine shells and fragments of shells 

in the till near Boston. 



158 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



\WJIL.7$, 



OPH AMy Warren— Continued. 

Bocton Soo. Nat. Hist., Froc., yoL24, pp. 
127-141. 1889. 

Am. Joar. Soi., vol. 37, pp. 359-372. 1889. 

AbHtracts, Nature) vol. 40, p. 68, 11 lines, 
1889 : Am. Otologist, voL 3, p. 399, | p. 1889. 

Summary account of ttie various localities ; 
description of deposits in which the shells 
occur, discussion of their transportation, and 
their bearini; on the reoenoy of the glacial 
period, late preglaoial climatic conditions and 
height of sea level, and a general review of 
the evidence bearing on the cause, nature, and 
amounts of post-glacial submergence in east- 
ern North America. 

[Age and origin of the pot-holes at 

Cobasset.] 

Beston Soo. Nat. Hist., Froo., voL 24, pp. 
22&-22& 1889. 

Includes reference to some other pot-holes 
of supposed glacial origin. 

The structare of drumlins. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist, Froc., vol. 24, pp. 
228-242. 1889. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 5, p. 61, 1 p. 

Detailed description of several drumlins in 
eastern Massachusetts, and discussion of their 
relations and history. 

The glacial moraines of Minnesota. 

Minnesota Aoad. Sci., Bull., vol 3, part 1, 
p. 12, i p. 1889. 

Short notice of paper. Classified list of 
moraines, and statement in regard to their 
lateral nature. 

Changes in the currents of the ice of 



the last glacial epoch in eastern Min- 
nesota. 

Minnesota Acad. Sci , Bull., vol. 3, part 1, 
pp. 51-56. 1889. 
Discussion of the history and results of the 



UPHAM, Warren— Continued. 

glacial flows, and of evidence of the existenee 
6f certain glacial rivers in the region. 

Description of maps showing the 

climate, geography, and geology of 
Minnesota.. 

Minnesota Aoad. Sci., BnlL, voL 3, part 1, 
pp. 151-165. 1889. 

Includes a general, account of the oharao* 
teristics and distribution of formations in 
Minnesota. 

[Beaches of Lake Agassiz.] See 

CHAMBERLIN, Division of glacial 
geology. 

Utah, Cambrian, Matthew. Walcott. 

coal, ASHBURNBR. 

fossils from San Pete region, White, 

C. A. 

gilsonite, Uinta Connty, Batmond. 

gold and silver mining, Holuster. * 

Henry Mountain laccolites. Cross. 

Emmons, S. F. 
iron ore of southern Utah, Blake. 

Laramie, Ward. White, C. A. 

marbles, Newberry. 

mountain up thrusts, Uinta, etc., 

White, C. A. 
obsidian, Iddings. 
old Telegraph mine, Lavagnino. 
Permian of Texas, Hill, R. T. 
relations of Laramie, White, C. A. 
stratigraphic position of Olenellus, 

Walcott. 
structural relations of ore deposits, 

Emmons, S. F. 
sulphur deposits, Faur. 
upper Eocene formation, Scott. 



V. 



VAN DIEST, P. H. Notes on some 
Boulder County veins. 

Colorado Sci. Soc., Froo., vol. 2, part 2, pp. 
50^-55, plate. 1887. 

Describes the gneisses, granites, felsite 
dikes, and their contained minerals. On ac- 
companying map indicates boundary of meta- 
morphic and sedimentary rocks. 

Address of the retiring president. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol. 2, pp. 278-285. 
1888. 

Refers to geologic features of Caribou 
Mountains, and at the Wilson mine, Idaho, in 
connection with the occurrence of gold at 
these localities. 

Colorado volcanic craters. 

Colorado Sci. Soc, Froc, vol 3, pp. 19-2i. 
J889. 



VAN DIEST, P. H.-<)ontinued. 

Describes some features of craters and lava 
flows in Rio Grande Connty, and refers to re- 
ports of craters at otlier points in Colorado. 

VAN HISE, C. B. Notes on the en- 
largement of horuhlendes and augites 
in fragmental and eruptive rocks. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 33, pp. 385-388. 
1887. 

Abstract-, Am. Naturalist, voL 22, p. 168, | p. 
'^ 1888. 

Calls attention to Beckers discovery of the 
fact in 1883, and describes some Penokee* 
Gogebic altered diahases exhibiting second- 
ary homblendic enlargements on aogite 
grains. 

The iron ores of the Penokee-Qogehio 

sexioa of Michigan and Wisconsin. 



DABTOX.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



159 



VAN HISE, C. R.— Continued. 

Am. Joar. Sci., 3d series, vol. 37, pp. 32-48, 
pi. 2. 1889. 

Abstracts, Natnre, vol. 39, p. 310, 8 lines, 
1889 ; Am. aeologist, vol. 3, pp. 197-198, 1889. 

Brief account 'of geology of Penokee-Goge- 
bic region, description of relations of ore de- 
posits and associated intrasive rocks, and 
discussion of the genesis of the ores. 

— The chemical origin of the Vermil- 
ion Lake iron ores. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 382-383. 1880?^ 
Keview of N. H. and H. V. Winchell " On a 
possible chemical origin of the iron ores of 
the Keewatin in Minnesota." Incidentally 
discusses the history of the discovery of nn- 
■conformity at the base of the Keewatin series, 
and the correlation of sonie of the formations 
which are included in the Keeiratin series. 

VAN NESS, W. W. J. Tin in North 
Carolina. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., voL 44, p. 344, | p. 
1887. 

General description of geology of King's 
Mountain region. 

Vassar Brothers' Institute, Transac- 
tions, vol. 4. 
Cutting at Croton Point, New York, 

Warring. ^ 

Evolution of continents, Warring. 
Plication in continental elevation, 

DWIGHT. 

Primordial of Wappinger Valley lime- 
stone region, Dwight. 

Vermont, great primordial qnartzite, 
Winchell, N. H. 

CameVs Hump and Mount Lincoln, 
Upham. 

conglomerates in gneisses, Hitch- 
cock. 

date of Report on Geology of Ver- 
mont, Hitchcock. 

fossils in lower Taconic of Emmons, 
Walcott. 

glaciation of mountains, Upham. 

principles of adversaries of the Ta- 
conic, Marcou. 

Taconic of Georgia, and Keport on 
Geology of Vermont, Marcou. 

Taconic question restated, Hunt. 

Taconic system of Emmons, Miller, 
Walcott. 

new locality of camptonite, Nason. 

Virginia, age of Potomac formation. 
Ward. 
antecedents of man in the Potomac 
valley, McGek, 



Virginia— Continued. ' 
coal, Ashburner. 
coal-field of southwestern Virginia, 

KiLLBBREW. 

Columbia formation, McGee. 

faults of southwestern Virginia, Ste- 
venson. 

flora of older Mesozoic, Stur. 

gas and coal, Chesterfield County, 
Russell, I. C. 

Glenmore iron estate, Greenbrier 
County, Page. 

iron ore, Rockbridge County. 

lower Carboniferous, Stevenson. 

Low Moor iron ore, Lyman. 

mineral resources of southwestern 
Virginia, Proctor. 

Natural Bridge, Balcony Falls, Luray, 
Great Valley, Britton. 

-natural coke from Midlothian, analy- 
sis, RiGGS. 

New River-Cripple Creek region, 
d'Invilliers and McCreath. 

Oriskany bowlder near Washington, 
District of Columbia, Curtice. 

reconnaissance in southwestern Vir- 
ginia, Stevenson. 

Richmond coal - field, Clifford. 
Newell. 

surface geology of southwestern Vir- 
ginia, Stevenson. 

sauropoda from the Potomac forma- 
tion, Marsh. 

terraces, McGee. Stevenson. 
White, I. C. 

three formations of the middle At- 
lantic coast, McGee. 

Trenton limestone from Lexington; 
analysis, RiGGS. 

upper Cumberland valley, McCreath 
and d'Invtlliers. 

[younger Mesozoic from Richmond 
southward], Ward. 

VOODES, Anthony W. Some forgotten 
Taconic literature. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 352-356. 1888. 

Descriptive notes and abstracts of papers 
by Dewey in 1819 and 1824, and Emmons, 1842 
and 1846. 

The genera and species of North 



American Carhoniferous trilohites. 

New York Acad. Sol., Annals, toL 4, pp. 69- 
105, pis. II, III. 1888. 

Includes a general sketch of the distribntion 
of the CarboniferoQS members in the United 
States, pp. 70-74. 



160 



EECORD OF GEOLOGY FOE 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL. Til. 



W. 



WADSWORTH, M. £. Preliminary 
description of the peridoty tes, gabbros, 
diabases, and andesytes of Minnesota. 

GeoLand Nat Hiit. Snnrej of Minnesota, 
Bnll. No.2,pp.&-159,12plate8. »>. St. Paul, 
1887. 

Abstract, Am. Natnralist, voL 22, pp. 452- 
453, 1 p. 1888. 

Description and discussion of the micro- 
petrography of a larice collection in greater 
part from the northeastern part of the State. 
Colored plates of micro rock sections. 

Also includes a discussion of classification, 
history, and relations of basic crystalline 
rocks. 

The Keweenawan system. 

Science, voL 10, p. 166, ^ p. 1887. 

Describes a locality on the Hungarian Kiver; 
a gradnation of the eastern sandstone into the 
Keweenaw rocks is exhibited without inter- 
Tening fault. Discusses the copper -bearing: 
roclis and relative position of the sandstones. 

[On sabdivisions, unconformities, 

characteristics, origin of some members, 
nomenclature, and life of the Archean, 
and origin of serpentine.] 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 69-70. 

Wagner Free Institute, Transactional 
vol. 1. 
Explorations on west coast of Florida, 
etc., Heilprin. 

WALCOTT, Charles D. Report • • • 
Division of Paleozoic Invertebrates. 

n. S. Geol. Snnrey, Siztii Annual Report, 
1884-'85, pp. 74-78. 1885. 

Notice of Paleozoic rocks of central Texas 
and Devonian fossils from northern Montana. 

The Taconic system. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33, pp. 153- 
154. 1887. 

Announces results of recent field work in 
Taconic region which indicates: 1. That the 
granular quartz is the shore deposit of the 
shales, sandstones, and limestones of the ** up- 
per Taconic and is Middle Cambrian in age," 
and 2. That the Potsdam is represented by the 
base of the limestone on the eastern side and 
by hydromica shales on the west side of the 
range ; the limestones and overlsring slates of 
the Taconic range representing the calcifer* 
ous and Hudson Biver groups, as shown by 
Dana. 

Fauna of the " upper Taconic " of 

Emmons, in Washington County, New 
York, 



WALCOTT, Charles D.— Continned. 

Am. Jonr. Sci., 8d series, voL 84, pp. 187- 
199, plate 1. 1887. 

Statement of stratigraphio position and ac- 
count of mode of ooonirenoe. 

Section of lower Silarian (Ordovi- 

oian) and Cambrian strata in central 
New York, as shown by a deep well 
'near Utica. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., toL 88, pp. 
211-212, f p. 1888. 
Description of drill-hole 2,250 feet in depth. 

Discovery of fossils in the lower Ta- 
conic of Emmons. [Abstract.] 

AnL Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc, voL 36, pp. 
212-213. 1888. 

Describes ocourrenoes of middle Cambrian 
species in the quartzites and Trenton-Chazy 
species in the limestones of southwestern 
Vermont, and calls attention to their bearing 
on the questioit of the age of the Taconic 
system. 

The Taconic system of Emmons, and 

the use of the name Taconic in geologic 
nomenclature. 

Am. Jour. Sci. , 3d series, roL 35, pp. 229-342, 
pL III. pp. 307-327, 394^1. 1888. 

Abstract, Nature, voL 87, p. 600, 14 lines ; p. 
623, 11 lines. 1888. 

Beview by Jules Maroon, Am. Geologist, 
vol. 2, pp. 10-23, 67-88. 1888. 

Beview of Emmons and others, description 
and discussion of relati<ms in the Taconic re- 
gion, announcement of disoovery of fossils 
and structural features throwing new light on 
the relative position, equivalenoy, and rela- 
tions of the various members of the Taconio 
system, discussion of nomenclature and classi- 
fication of the Cambrian formations. Ac- 
companied by a colored geologic map. 

Cambrian fossils from Mount Ste- 
phen, Northwest Territory of Gitnada. 

Am. Jour. Sci. , 3d series, voL 36, pp. 161-166, 
September number. 1888. 

Bead to Biological Society of Washington, 
1888. 

Beview of some of the species described by 
Bominger, and discussion of the paleontologio 
evidence on the stratigraphio position of the 
Cambrian of Mount Stephen. 

[On the nomenclature and origin of 

the Archean and the use of the term 

Taconic] 

International Oongress of Gteologistc, Am. 
Oommittee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 57-58. 

Synopsis of conclusions on the ** Ta- 
conic system " of Emmons, 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



lei 



"WALCOTT, Charles D.— Continned. 

Int«mational Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oomznittee Reports, 1888, B, pp. 25-29. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 215-219. 1888. 

Extracts from paper in American Jonriial 
of Science, 1888, with additional notes. 

Report — Paleozoic division of inver- 
tebrate paleontology. 

XT. S. Geol. Snrvey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
FoweU, 1885-'86, pp. 113-117. 1888. 

Reference to the formations constituting the 
Paleosio in central Nevada, especially to the 
discovery of Devonian and lower Carbonifer- 
ous; the thickness and horizon of the Wah- 
satch Cambrian ; to studies by H. S. Williams 
on the stratigraphy and fbunal relations of the 
Devonian of southern New Tork ; and col- 
lection of Cambrian fossils in the southern 
Appalachian by Cooper Curtice. 

— '■ — Stratigraphio position of the Ole- 
nellns fannse of North America and 
Europe. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, voL 37, pp. 874-392, 
voL 38, pp. 29-42. 1889. 

Abstracts, Nature, vol. 40, pp. 68, 310-311, 24 
lines, 1889. New York Acad. Sci., Tfans., 
vol 8, p. 176, i p. 1889. 

Review and discussion of paleontologic and 
stratigraphic relations of the lower Cambrian 
to the middle Cambrian, and of the strati- 
graphio position, geographic distribution, zo- 
<dogy and stratigraphio oharacteristios of the 
Olenellus zone in America and Europe. In- 
cludes a description of the Cambrian of New- 
foundland based on recent examinations, and 
a general review and tabulation of Cambrian 
taxonomy. 

A simple method of measuring the 
thickness of inclined strata. 

IF. S. National Museum, Proc, voLll,pp. 
447-44& 1889. 

"WALKER, J. B. Notes on the geology 
of Bornet County. 

GfreoL and Sol., Bull., voL 1, February, 
1889. 49. 

Statements in regard to characteristics, 
relations, and distribution of the Cretaceous 
and Carboniferous. 

'WARD, Lester F. Synopsis of the flora 
of the Laramie group. 

XT. S. G-eol. Survey, Sixth Report, J. W. 
FoweU, 1884-'85, pp. 399-557, pis. m-LZY. 
1885. 

Abstracts, Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 1011- 
1012; Am. G^eologist, vol. 2, pp. 56-58, 1888. 

Beview, Science, voL 10, pp. 150-151. 1887. 

Seviews the opinions which have been held 
in regard to the age and position of the Lara- 
mie and equivalent formationa Describes 
the nature, extent, and vegetation of the 
group and discusses its age, history, distribn- 

BULL. 76 11 



WARD, Lester F.— Continued. 

tion, and floral relations, the eqnivalenoy of 
groups near its horizon, and the stratigraphio 
and geographic range of the flora of the Lara- 
mie, Senonian, and Bocene, . Gives a brief 
account of observation on the lower Tertiary 
or upper Cretaceous at several points in Col- 
orado and Wyoming, and along tlie Missouri 
from Fort Benton to Bismarck. 

Eyidence of the fossil plants as to the 

age of the Potomac formation. 

Am. Jour. Soi., 8d series, voL 38, pp. 119-131. 

ICRw. 

Abstract, Nature, vol 38, p. 462, 9 lines. 1888. 
Bead to National Academy of Sciences, 1888. 

Report — Division of paleobotany. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
FoweU, 188&-'86, pp. 123-126. 188a 

Includes a brief reference to the occurrence 
of outcrops of younger Mesozoic from Bich- 
mond southward, and at Weldon, North Car- 
olina. 

WARDROPXSR, D. Lee. The forma- 
tion of coal beds. 

Eng. and Mining Jour. , voL 45, p. 473, | coL, 
40. 1888. 

Describes occurrence of small lenticulat 
coal masses in sandstone over coal beds in 
northwestern Greorgia. 

» WARRING, Charles B. The catting at 
Croton Point, New York. 

Tassar Brokers' Inst., Trans., vol. 4, pp. 
274-278. 1887. 

Describes and flgures beds of sand and 
cobbles unconformably overlain by two layers 
of very floe material conformable to the sur- 
face of the ground, on Hudson Biver Just 
north of the mouth of the Croton Biver. 

The evolution of continents. 

Vassar Brokers' Inst, Trans., voL 4, pp. 
256-271,278-274. 1887. 

General discussion of the relations of con- 
tinental masses; the theories of continental 
formation and the solidiflcation of the earth's 
crust. Advances the hypothesis that the con- 
tinents originally constituted a great triangu- 
lar clot of solidified matter floating on a mol- 
ten surface, and by breaking apart near the 
central line at the present Atlantic Ocean, 
separated into continents which were thence 
solidified into their present positions. 

Washburn College Laboratory, Bull- 
etin, ToL 2. 

Paleontology of the Plains, Cragin. 
Region soath of great bend of the 
Arkansat, Cragin. 

WaBhingtoD, analysis of soil, Schnbi- 

DBR. 



162 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75. 



WaBhington — Continued. 

changes in river courses due to glaci- 
ation, Willis. 

coal, ASBQ9UBNER. 

glaciatioii of Pacific coast, Wbight. 

invertebrate fossils from Pacific 
coast, White, C. A. 

Mount Ranier and the glaciers, Wil- 
lis. 

Pnget group. White, C. A, 

transcontinental railways, Lano. 

structure of northern Washington, 
Willis. 

"Waahingtoii, Philosophical Society, 
Bulletin, vol. 9. 

Faults of Great Basin, etc., Russell. 
Geologic history of Sierra Nevada, 

Gilbert. 
Geology of northern California, DiL- 

LEB. 

Sierra structure not extended into 
Washington, Willis. 

vol. 10. 

Mount Ranier and its glaciers, Wil- 
lis. 

vol. 11. 



Problems of physical geology, DuT- 

TON. 

Crystallization of igneous rocks, 

IBDINGS. 



T77ASMIJTH, Henry A. Studies on the 
stratification of the anthracite meas- 
ures of Pennsylvania. 

Franklin Init. Jonr., vol. 124, pp. 109-126, 
4 plates. 1887. 
Abstaract, Am. Naturalist, yoL 24, p. 768, ^ p. 

1890. 

Bisonsses relations of flexures to faults and 
the occurrence and causes of offsets in some 
of the collieries of the anthracite re$:ion. 

Notes on the Pittshurg coal hed and 

and its distnrhances. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 1, pp. 272-277. 1888. 

Description and discussion of flexures and 
fiaults atBlddle, Westmoreland County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

— Notes on the structural geology of 
the Carhoniferous formation of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Am. G-eologist, voL 2, pp. 311-323. 1888. 

Discussion of the structural relations of the 
coal heds in the Pittsburg and in the anthra- 
cite regions. 

The southern anthracite coal field of 

Pennsj^lvania — its enormous distur- 



WASMUTH, Henry A.— Continued, 
bances and consequent premature ex- 
haustion. 

FranUln Inst. JTonr., voL 125, pp. 110-114. 
1888. 

Seference to faults and steep folds indicat- 
ing the existence of much greater disturbance 
than is shown on the geological survey maps. 

VTEBER, Adolph H. Natural gas. 

Oalifomia, Serepth Report of State Miner- 
alogist, pp. 181-191. 1888. 

Section in superficial deposits at Eureka; 
notice of occurrences ^of lignite at various 
points in Humboldt, Trinty, Tehama, Men- 
docino, Sonoma, Colusa, and Shasta counties. 

Petroleum and asphaltum in north- 



ern California. 

Oalifomia, Seventh Report of State BSiner- 
alogist, pp. 195-202. 1888. 

Gives sections on coast south of Bear River 
and at Point Arena showing relations of bitu- 
minous beds. 

TTTSBSTER, Clement L. On the glacial 
flow in Iowa. 

Am. Naturalist, vol 21, pp. 758-781. 1887. 

Discusses the evidence of three ice flows. 
Describes strise, the drift, and the inner and 
outer moraines of the last two glacial advan- 
ces. 

Notes on the geology of Johnson 

County, Iowa. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 408-419, pL 5. 
1888. 

Description of pot-holes and old river chan- 
nel in Devonian limestone at its overlap 
by the Caaboniferous; peat beds under the 
drift at various points in Iowa; terraces 
along Iowa River; loess and drift. Brief dis- 
cussion of age, origin, and conditions of depo- 
sition of the loess. 

Notes on the Rockford shales. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 22, pp. 444-446. 1888. 

Reference to lithologic and paleontologic 
variations at dififerent localities, and descrip- 
tion of fossils from Owens's Grove. Cerro 
Gordo County. 

On the glacial drift and loess of a 



portion of the northern-central basin of 
iQwa. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 972-979. 1888. 

Drifts, loess, vegetal beds between drift 
sheets, distribution of erratics, terraces, rela* 
tion of drainage to structure. 

— Description of new species of $>ssils 



from the Rockford shales of Iowa. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 1013-1018. 1888. 

Reference to the great variety of conditions 

of deposition indicated in the Devonian of 



DAICTON.J 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



163 



"WIBBSTER, Clemeot L.— Continned. 
Iowa, and the eflbota upon the faooal rela* 
tions. 

A general preliminary description of 



the Devonian rocks of Iowa, which 
constitute a typical section of the De- 
Tonian formation of the interior conti- 
nental area of North America. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 23, pp. 220^-243. 1889. 

Description of the oharaoteristios, distribii' 
tion, and relations, and discussion of equiv- 
alency, stratigraphic range, and paleontologio 
relations of the several members. 

A description of the Rockford shales 

of Iowa. 

Davenport, Acad. Sci., Froo., vol. 5, part 1, 
pp. 100^109. 1880. 

Description of stratigraphy, and lists of 
fossils. 

WEED, Walter Harvey. On the forma- 
tion of siliceous sinter hy the vegeta- 
tion of thermal springs. 

Am. Jonr. Sol., 8d series, voL 37, pp. 351- 
359. 1889. 

Describes the formation of siliceous depos* 
its by algaa and mosses in the geyser waters 
in the Yellowstone Park ; discusses their rate 
of growth; gives analyses of Yellowstone 
Park and New Zealand sinters, and discusses 
the nature of the latter. Preceded by a gen- 
eral discussion of the deposition of silioa by 
geyser waters. 

WENDT, Arthur F. The copper ores of 
the southwest. 

Am. Inst. Mining Engineers, Trans., vol. 
15, pp. 25-77, plate. 1887. 

Abstract, Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 43, 
pp, 9i-96, 112-lU, 133-134, 150-162, 183-185. 
1887. 

Describes the occurrence of ores in Carbou' 
iferous limestones, and associated eruptives 
at Santa Bita, New Mexico, Clifton, Bisbee, 
and Black Bange districts, Arizona, and in re< 
cent formations at Moleije, Lower California. 
Includes notes on micropetrography, by A. 
A. Julien. 

West Virginia, coal, Ashburneb. 

coal from Jefferson County ; analysis, 
Whitfield, J. E. 

WHITE, Charles A. Report 

Division of Mesozoic Invertebrates. 

IT. S. Geol. Survey, 6th Annual Report, 
J. W. Powell, 1884-'8d, pp. 72-74. 1886. 

Announces bis conclusions in regard to the 
position of the Chico and T6jon groups, and 
the auriferous slate series of California 
Calls attention to the occurrence of a Creta> 
ceous formation in Mendocino County, Cali- 
fornia, to which the provisional name of 
Wallala group is given. 



WHITB, Charles A.— Continued. 

On the age of the coal fpund in the 

region traversed by the Rio Grande. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 33, pp. 18-20. 
1887. 

Befers it either to the Laramie or Fox Hills 
formation, or to both, and describes the ex- 
tension of these formations southward into 
Mexicow 

On the inter-relation of contempora- 
neous fossil faunas and floras. 

Am. Jour. Sol. , 3d series; toL 33, pp. 364-374. 
1887. 

Discusses the faunal and floral relations 
and contemporaneity of deposition of the 
Laramie, and the equivalents of the Bridger, 
and the stratigraphic position of these groups. 

On the relation of the Laramie mol- 

luscan fauna to that of the succeeding 
fresh-water Eocene and other groups. 

U. S. Q-eol. Surrey, Bull., voL 5, pp. 391-443, 
5 plates. No. 34. 1887. 

Abstracts, Science, voL 10, pp. 128-127. 
1888; Popular Science Monthly, voL 33, p. 420, 
I col. 1888. 

Describes Wasatch fossOs fh>m San Pete 
YaUey and adjacent portions of Wasatch 
Mountains, and discusses the &nnal and 
stratigraphic relations of these beds, and of 
the Bear Biver Laramie, Wasatch, Laramie^ 
Puerco, and Fort Union groups. (The ab- 
stract in Science is a very complete one.) 

On # the Cretaceous formations of 

Texas, and their relation to those of 
other portions of North America. 

Philadelphia, Acad. Sci., Froc, 1887, part 
1, pp. 30-47. 

Describes results of studies by B. T. Hill, 
firom which is given a descriptive table of the 
strata of the eastern half of Texas, and their 
supposed equivalents in the Mississippi, and 
upper Missouri Biver sections. Discusses 
the equivalency, distribution, subdivisions* 
and relations to associated formations. 

On the occurrence of later Creta- 
ceous deposits in Iowa. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 1, pp. 221-227. 1888. 

Beferences to localities and occurrence of 
fossils, and discussion of their stratigraphic 
position in the Cretaceous, the position of 
Cretaceous shore line, and original thickness 
and extent of the Cretaceous in Iowa. 

On the relation of the Laramie group 

to earlier and later formations. 

Am. JTour. Sci., 3d series, voL 35, pp. 482-438. 
1888. 

Abstract, Nature, vdL 38, p. 189, 7 lines. 
1888. 

Description of the relations of the Laramie 
in the lower Bio Grande region in Texas ^^^ 



164 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



(BULL.7S. 



"WHITE, Charles A.— Con tinned. 

Mexico, references to the relations of the 
Belly Birer series, and discussion of the his- 
tory of the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary 
in ireatem America, and the Cretaceous age 
of the greater part of the Laramie. 

On the Paget group of Washington 

Territory. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, voL 36, pp. 443-460. 
1888. 

Abstract, Nature, yoL 89, p. 189, 16 lines. 
188a 

Statement of jj^neral relations and discns* 
sion of genesis, history, biologic relations, 
and correlation with Laramie and Chico- 
T6Jon groups. 

Mountain npthrusts. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, pp. 399-408. 1888. 

Sections and descriptions of the Uinta fold, 
and the Junction and Yampa mountain np- 
thrusts, and discussion of their history and 
the philosophy of their uplift. 

[On the fauna of the Permian of 

Baylor, Archer and Wichita counties, 
Texas.] 

Am. Naturalist, rol. 22, p. 926, i p. 1888. 
Statement of his opinion in regard to the 
Permian age of the formations. 

On HindeastrsBa, a new generic form 

of Cretaceous Astr^dsB. 

G-eol. Magazine, 3d decade, voL 5, pp. 362- 
364. 1888. 

Incidentally refors to stratigraphic position 
of Ripley group. 

Remarks on the genus Ancella, 

with special reference to its occurrence 
in California. 

U. S. Gi-eol. Surrey, Monograph, No. 13, 
Quicksilver deposits of the Pacific slope. 
By G. F. Becker, pp. 226-232, plates m, iv. 
1888. 

Includes a statement in regard to the age 
of the containing series indicated by its oc- 
currence. 

Report — Mesozoic division of inver- 
tebrate paleontology. 

n. S. GS-eol. Survey, Seventh Report, J. W. 
Powell, 1885.'86, pp. 117-120. 1888. 

Keferences to thickness, age, and fauna of 
coal-bearing series in hills south of San Pete 
valley, Utah, their faunal relation to the Lara- 
mie and their equivalency with the coal- 
bearing beds near Evanston, Wyoming; the 
occurrence of coal in the Laramie in Cotton- 
wood Cafion, the equivalency of the coal 
series in Pleasant valley and Coalville, Utah, 
and the marine origin of the containing 
strata; the faunal relations ofthe Laramie and 
Wasatch, and extent of land area during 
the latter part of the Jurassic period. 



., Charles A.— Continaed. 

— The lower Cretaceous of the South- 
west and its relation to the underlying 
and overlying formations. 

Am. JTonr. Sol., 8d series, voL 38, pp. 44i9- 
445. 1889. 

An aooonnt of its characteristics and rela* 
tions in various districts in Texas and north- 
em Mezioo, and disonssion of its stratign^hio 
range, equivalency, history, and extent. 

— On the Permian formation of Texas. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, pp. 109-128, pL (Feb- 
ruary, 1889). 

Discussion of faunal and stratigrapbio re- 
lations and range; brief desoription of its 
several members, estimates of thickness, dip, 
and extent, characteristics and relations of 
associated formations, and review of evidenoe 
and opinions bearing on the idoitity and 
equivalency of the Permian in North America. 

— On invertebrate fossils from the 



Pacific coast. 

XT. S. G-eol. Survey, Bull., vol. 8; pp. 433- 
532, pis. I-XIV. So. 6L 1889. 

Abstract. Am. Q-eologist, vol. 5^ pp. 109-110, 
f p. 1890. 

The paper consists of five parts : L New 
fossil mollnsca fh>m the Chioo-T^on series of 
California, which includes a disonssion of the 
stratigraphic and founal relation of the series. 
II. Equivalents of the Chico-T^on series in 
Oregon and Washington; a description of a 
number of new or little-known localities. HI. 
Cretaceous fossils from Yancouver Island 
region, including some remarks on the fiftunal 
r^ations of the Vancouver group. IV. Kol^ 
In scan fauna of the Pnget group; includes 
some general remarks on the geology of the 
group, its history, extent, and faonid and 
floral relations. Y. Mesosoic moUosoa ttom 
the southern coast of the Alaskan peninsula, 
including some remarks on the horison ofthe 

, containiDg beds. 

The North American Mesozoic. 

Science, vol. 14, pp. 160-166. 1889. 
Nature, vol. 40, p. 557, 12 lines. 1889. 
Abstracts of address to Am. Assoc. Adv. 
Science, 1889. 

WHITE, C. D. Carboniferons glacia- 
tion in the sonthern and eastern hemi- 
spheres, with some notes on the Glossop- 
teris flora. 

Am. G-eologist, voL 8, pp. 299-330. 1889. 

Sets forth a summary of the evidence of an 
early Carboniferous glacial epoch in the 
region bordering the Indian Ocean in Asia 
Africa, and Australia, and reviews the dis- 
cnssions of its date and extent, the correla- 
tion of the terranes by which it is represented 
in different regions, the origin and history of 
the Glossopteris flora, and the evidence of an 
AMca-India-Aostralian continent. 



DABTON.J 



RECOBD OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



165 



WHITE, I. C. Ronnded bowlders at 

high altitudes aloDg some Appalachian 

rivers. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 34, pp. 374- 
381. 1887. ' 

A discussion of the history recorded in the 
howlder deposits and terraces, especialljr in 
connection with the existence of a glacial ice 
dam in the Ohio. Discnsses the relations 
and significance of bowlder deposits along 
the upper Ohio, the Kanawha, the Pitts- 
burg regions, the Potomac, and the James ; 
the bowlder and clay^co^red divides of the 
Teazes valley near Charleston and Fitts- 
bnrg and McEeesport, Pennsylvania; the 
terraces of the Mcnongahela and Yonghio- 
gheny^ the variations in altitude of these 
howlder and terrace deposits, and the origin 
of the high-level deposits along the Cheat 
Biver of West Virginia. 

WHITE AVES, J. F. Notes on some 

Mesozoic fossils from various localities 

on the coast of British Columbia, for 

the most part collected by Dr. G. M. 

^ Dawson in the summer of 1886. 

^ Oanadai G-eol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, Re- 

port, 1886, part B, pp. 108-114. Appendix 1. 
1887. 

Includes mention of localities and some 
snggestions in regard to horizons indicated by 
the fossils. 

WHITFIELD, J. Edward. [Analyses 
of volcanic dusts.] 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., voL 7, p. 141, | p. 
lTo.42. 1887. 

From Marsh Creek valley, Idaho, Little 
Sage Creek, Montana, and Devil's pathway, 
Montana. 

. Coal from Jefferson County, West 

Virginia. 

XT. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., vol.7,p.l4d, J p. 
lTo.42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

Coal from Walnut Cove, Stokes 

County, North Carolina. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., voL 7, p. 146, i p. 
No. 42. 1887. 
Analysis. 

WHITFIELD, R. P. New Jersey Cre- 
taceous. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 66-69. 1887. 
General re\iew of stratigraphy and fauna! 
relations of the Cretaceous and Eocene, and 
discussion of the equivalency of the former 
with members in the upper Missouri section. 
• [On the use of the term "Quater- 
nary."] 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Oommittee Reports, 1888, F, pp. 15-16, i p. 



WHITFIELD, R. P.— Continued. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 281-282. 1888. 
Consideration of its taxonomic value. 

Observations on some imperfectly 

known fossils from the Calciferous 
saudrock of Lake Champlain, and de- 
scriptioDS of several new forms. 

AnL Museum Nat. Hist., Bull., vol. 2, pp. 
41-63, plates VII-X. 1889. 

Preceded hy a brief description of the re* 
lations near Plattsburg, New York. 

Note on the faunal resemblance be- 
tween the Cretaceous formations of 
New Jersey and those of the Gulf 
States. 

Am. Museum Nat. Hist., Bull., voL 2, pp. 
113-116. 1889. 

Parallel lists of species from Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi, Texas, and Dakota, and commenta on 
the faunal relations. 

WHITING-, H. A. Mono County. 

Oalifomia, Eighth Report of State Miner- 
alogists, pp. 352-401. 1888. 

Includes incidental references to geologic 
relations at various localities and to i>etro- 
graphic features of some of the rocks. 

WHITTLE, Charles Llvy. The intru- 
sive and extrusive Triassic trap sheets 
of the Connecticut valley. See 
DAVIS, William Morris, and. 

WILLIAMS, George H. On a plan 
proposed for future work upon the 
geological map of the Baltimore region. 

Johns Hopkins Univ. Oircnlar, Na 59, pp. 
122-123. 1887. 
Statement of scope. 

Rutil nach Ilmenit in verandertem 

Diabaa. Pleonast (Hercyint) in Norit 
von Hudson-Fluss. Perowskit in 
Serpentin (Peridotit) von Syracuse, 
New York. 

Neues Jahrhuch, 1887, Band 2, ss. 263-267. 

Describes micropetrography of diabase 
from Big Quinnesec Falls, Menominee Biver; 
the norite of the Cortlandt series, and the 
serpentine of Syracuse, the origin of which is 
also briefly discussed. 

The norites of the " Cortlandt seriej " 

on the Hudson Biver near Peekskill, 
New York. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 33, pp. 135-144, 
101-199. 1887. 

Abstract, Neues Jahrbuch, 1887, Band 2, ss. 
816-317. 

After a review of the distribution of 
hypersthene rocks in geceral, describes and 
discusses the micropetrography, ocoarreaM 



166 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[BULL. 75. 



"WILLIAMS, George H.— Continued, 
aod some stnictoral relations of tbe "norite. 

proper," "hornblende norite," "micanorito," 

"hyperite,"or "aagitenorite," "pyroxenite" 

and their gradnations. 

Holocrystalline granitic strnctnre in 

emptive rocks of Tertiary age. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, voL 33, pp. 81fr-816, 
1887. 

Notice of some of Stelzner conclnsions in 
his memoir on ** The Geoloji^y of the Arisen' 
tine Bepnblic." Incidentally refers to the 
natoreof the "Nevadite" of von Elchthofen 
and discosses the relations of stracture in 
rock masses to the conditions under which 
they solidify. 

On tlie serpentine (peridotite) occur- 
ring in the Onondaga salt group at 
Syracuse, New York. ' 

Am. Jonr. Scl., 3d series, vol. 84, pp, 137-145. 
1887. 

Abstracts by author. Science, voL 0, pp. 
137-145, 1887; Neues JTahrbnch, 1888, Band 1, 
ss. 80-81. 

Describes the occurrence of the rock and 
its chemic and mineralogio constitaents. 
Discnsses its alteration from peridotite and its 
dose resemblance to the dikes of Elliott 
County, Kentucky. 

The gabbros and associated horn- 
blende rocks occurring in the neigh- 
bprhood of Baltimore, Maryland. U. S. 
Geological Survey, Ball. No. 28. 

Abstract, Geol. Mag. y 3d decade, vol. 4, pp. 

87-88. 1887. 

Some examples of the dynamic met- 

amorphism of the ancient eruptive 
rocks on the south shore of Lake 
Superior. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc, voL 36, pp. 
225-226. 1888. 

Description of certain modifications which 
. rocks undergo when subjected to the action of 
mountain-making forces. 

The gabbros and diorites of the 

•*Cortlandt series" on the Hudson 
River near Peekskill, New York. 

Am. Jonr. Scl., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 438-418. 
1888. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, vol. 22, p. 929, | p. 
1888. 

Beferences to occurrence and relation to 
each other, and petrograpbic description. 

The contact metamorphism pro- 
duced in the adjoining mica schists 
and limestones by the massive rocks of 
the '* Cortland t series" near Peekskill, 
New York. 



WILLIAMS, George H.— Continued. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 3d series, vol. 36, pp. 254-269. 
pL VL 1888. 

Abstracts, Johns Hopkins Univ. dircnlars, 
vol. 7, pp. 63-65, No. 65, 18^; Am. Natur- 
alist, vol. 22, pp. 1020-1021, i p., 1888. 

Mainly petrographic. Describes contact re- 
lations at Cmger*s Station and on the southern 
end of Verplanck's Point. E6sum6 of evidence 
of the eruptive nature of the massive mem- 
bers of the Cortlandt series and references to 
conditions of solidification, and location of the 
center of eruptive action. 

[SubdivisiAi of Archean, nature of 

oldest crystalline schists, origin of ser- 
pentine, and use of term "Taconic/'] 

International Congress of GreoUgists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, A, pp. 67-68. 

On the use of the term " Taconio." 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, p. 17, 3 lines. 
Am. Geologist, voL 2, p. 207. 1888. 
Expression of opinion. 

Geology of the Baltimore region. 

Johns Hopkins XTniv. Circulars, voL 7, p. 73, 
icol. No. 65. 1888. 
Refers to the sequence of the emptives. 

Progress of the work on the Arohean 

geology of Maryland. 

Johns Hopkins Univ. Circulars, voL 7, pp. 
61-63. No. 65. 1888. 

Greneral sketch of Maryland geology and 
description of the relations of the gneisses 
and various emptives in tiie Baltimore region 
and northward to the Pennsylvania line. 

Geology of Fernando de Noronha, 

Part II, petrography. 

Am. Jour. Sci.. 3d series, voL 37, pp. 178-180. 
1889. 

Abstract, Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 522. | p. 
1889. 

Petrographic description of specimens of 
phon elites, trachytes, andandesites. 

Contributions to the mineralogy of 

Maryland. 

Johns Hopkins XTniv. Circulars, voL 8, pp. 
99-100. No. 75. 1889. 

Includes reference to the occurrence and 
composition of an ottrelite rock in Frederick 
County. 

WILLIAMS, n. S. Methods of instruc- 
tion in general geology. 

Am. Naturalist, voL 21, pp. 616-626. 1887. 

On the fossil faunas of the upper 

Devonian. The Genesee section. New 
York. 

XT. S. Geol. Survey, Bull., voL 6, pp. 481-603, 
pis. I-IV. No. 41. 1887. 



DABTON.] 



RECOED OF GEOLOGY FOE 1887 TO 1889. 



167 



'WILLIAMS, H. S.— Cootinued. 

DiscQSsioD of tbe paleontologio aod strati- 
•graphic relations, eqaivalenoy, and range of 
tbe meinl^ers of tbe upper Devonian and base 
of tbe lower Carboniferons in soalhem New 
York, northern Pennsylvania, and Ohio. 
Detailed description of stratigraphy and 
fauna at various localities from Genesee 
County, New York, to MoEean CJounty, 
Pennsylvania. 

On the different types of the Devo- 
nian system in North America. 

Am. Jonr. Scl., 3d series, vol. 35, pp. 51-^. 
1888. 

Abstracts, Nature, vol. 37, p. 358, 11 lines, 
1888; Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc, vol. 
30, pp. 207-208, I p. 1888. 

£6sum6 of the more prominent features 
and discussion of the paleontologio and strat- 
igrapbic relations of tbe Devonian formations 
in tbe several areas. 

Report of the subcommittee on the 

upper Paleozoic (Devonic). 

International Oongress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, C, pp. 31. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2. pp. 225-239. 1888. 

Beview by Jules Maroon, Am. Geologist, 
vol. 3, pp. 60-61, 1 p. 1889. 

A general review of the distributlou, tax- 
onomy, and nomenclature of the Devonian 
members of North America. 

On the relation of the Devonian 

faunsd of Iowa. 

'*'Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 230-233. 1889. 
Discussion of tbe faunal relations, and stra- 
tigraphy and equivalency of the Iowa Devo- 
nian. 

The use of fossils in determining the 

age of geologic terranes. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Proc., vol. 37, p. 
206, {p. 1889. 

Discusses the value and limitation of pale- 
ontologio correlations. 

[Comparision of cis- with trans- 
Atlantic formations.] 

Nature, vol. 40, p. 557, i col. 1888. 

Abstract of paper read to American Asso- 
ciation, 1889. 

Fanual relations of Devonian of England 
and America. 

WILLIAMS, S. 6. Note on the lower 
Helderberg rocks of Cayuga Lake. 

New York, Sixth Report of the State Geol- 
ogist, 1886, pp. 10-12. 1887. 

Notice of additional discoveries of fossils. 
Bepeats bis opinion that tbe ''Salina and 
lower Helderberg are merely different phases 
of one geological period, deposited under 
very different conditions indeed, but to a 
great extent contemporaneously." 



' WILLIAMS, S. G.— Continued. 

The TuUy limestone, its distribution, 

and its known fossils. 

New York, Sixth Report of the Geologist, 
1886, pp. 13-29. Map. 1887. 

Describes its line of outcrop, oenstitnents, 
thickness, structure, and fossils. Accomp** 
nied by a map of its outcrop. 

WILLIS, Bailey. Changes in river 
courses in Washington Territory dae 
to glaciation. 

n. S. GeoL Survey, Bull., voL 6. pp. 473-480, 
4pUte8. No. 40. 1887. 

Discussion of the agency of lava flows and 
glaciers in diverting a portion of tbe course 
of the Columbia Biver, Accompanied by 
a geologic map indicating the formations 
along a line of reconnaissance, and baoh- 
ured maps showing preglacial channel of 
the Similkameen Biver, tbe lower valley of the 
Okinakame Biver, and Columbia Biver from 
the latter to Lake Chelan. 

Topography and structure in the 

Bays Mountains, Tennessee. 

School of Mines Quarterly, voL 8, pp. 242- 
252. 1887. 

Describes their structure, topography, and 
drainage, and discusses the relations of drain- 
age and topography to structure, and the time 
and extent of Appalachian uplift. 

[ ] [Absence of Sierra Nevada struct- 
ure in northern Washington Territory.] 

Washington, Phil. Soc, Bull., vol. 9, p. 8, | 
p. 1887. 

States that the eastern face of the Cascade 
Bange is not determined by a great fiftolt. 

The marble of Hawkins County, 

Tennessee. 

School of Mines Quarterly, vol. 9, pp. 112- 
123. 1888. 

Description of abed of Trenton marble, and 
the great fault by which it is cut off from the 
adjoining Cambrian rocks. 

Monnt Rainier and its glaciers. 

Washington, Phil. Soc, Bull., vol. 10, p. 10, 
I p. 1888. 

Brief mention of the p^per, and statement • 
in regard to tbe relations of Mounts Bainier 
and Shasta as points of volcanic activity. 

Bound about Asheville. 

National Geogr. Mag., vol. 1, pp. 291-300. 
Map. 1889. 

Classification of the topographic character- 
istics of the western North Carolina-East Ten- 
nessee region, and discussion of evidence and 
history of successive stages of elevation and 
base leveling. 

"WINCHELL, Alexander. Report of 
geological observations made iu north- 



168 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



JBITLL, 78. 



"WINCHELL, AlexaDder.^Continaed. 
eastern Minnesota during the season of 
1886. 

Q-aol. and Nat. Hist. Surrey of KUnn., 15fh 
Report, 1886, pp. 7-206. Hap. 1887. 

Field notee of work in region north of the 
western part of Lake Saperior. Beecribes 
and fijj^reii many details of stmctnre, rock 
texture, and dietribution, volcaniam, Toin 
stones, etc., in the crystalline and metamor- 
phio series. In a sammary of obserTations 
(p. 172) gives a general description of the re* 
gi<m, and discusses the structural and strati- 
graphic relations, extent, equiyalejicy, modi- 
fications, variations, origin, aud geologic 
history of the formations. Seviews Lawson 
on the KeewatiD series, and on gneissic folia- 
tion. Notices some glacial phenomena in the 
region. Accompanied by a folded colored 
geologic map, in part, by N. H. WinchelL 

Unconformability between the An- 

imikie and the Vermilion series. 

Am. Jour. Sol., 3d series, voL 34, p. 814. 
1887. 

" The Animikie flint schists dipping, 5° S. 
have been traced by me to within seven feet 
of sericitio argillites of the Vermilion series 
dipping about 67o NE." 

The ancouformities of the Animikie 

in Minnesota. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 14-24. 1888. 
Reference to characteristics, relations, dis- 
tribation, and equivalency of the Animikie, 
and description and discussion of relations in 
northern Minnesota and some adjacent por- 
tions of Canada. 

Some effects of pressure of a conti- 
nental glacier. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 139-143. 1888. 

Discussion of relations of crustal deforma- 
tion to the great lava outflows of the far West, 
and to post-glacial uplift of shore lines in the 
Atlantic coast region. 

The Taconic question. 

Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 347-363. 1888. 

Iteview of literature, and discussion of the 
grounds of the opponents of the Taconic 
system, and the nomenclature of the lower 
Paleozoic. ^ 

Geology as a means of culture. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 44r^l, 100-114. 
1888. 
[On the use of the term " Taconic."] 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
' Committee Reports, 1888, 6, pp. 12-^13. 
Am. Geologist, voL 2, pp. 202-203. 1888. 
Blacussion of its applicability. 

[On the nomenclature of the Ter- 
tiary, and the faunal relations, and 
designation of the Quaternary.] 



"WINCHELL, Alexander. — Continued. 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, F, pp. 16-17, | p. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 282-283. 1888. 

Discusses the taxouomic value of the Lyell- 
ian divisions, and the term " Quaternary." 

Report of a geological survey in 

Minnesota during the season of 1887, 
embracing comparative observations in 
some other regions. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
16th Report, pp. 133-391. 1888. 

Description and discussion of I'elations in 
northeastern Minnesota, preceded by an ac- 
count and discussion of observations in the 
original Huroniau in Canada, and in Northern 
Michigan, and Wisconsin. 

Systematic results of a field study of 

the Archean rocks of the northwest. 
[Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, voL 37, pp. 205- 
206, 1 p. 1889. 

Abstract, Science, voL 1^ p. 100, 12 lines. 
1888. 

Summary statement of stratigraphic succes- 
sion and equivalency of the crystalline series 
of the Northwest. 

Conglomerates enclosed in gneissic 

terranes. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 153-185. 1889. 

Describes pebble-bearing gneisses in the 
region northwest of Lake Superior, discusses 
the bearing of their occurrence on the origin 
and history of the gneiss, and cites other in- 
stances of conglomeritic crystalline rooks in 
Kew England and in Europe. 

[ ] Rejoinder to Dr. Lawson [on rock 

foliation and sedimentation]. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 19&-195. 1889. 

Discussion of some conditions of metamor- 
phism, and citation of English investigations 
bearing on the question. 

Two systems confounded in the Hu- 
roniau. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 3, pp. 212-214. 1889. 

Bevie w of Bonney. * ' Notes on a part of the 
Huroniau series in the vicinity of Sudbury, 
Canada." Discnsaes the age and equivalency 
of the beds described by Bonney, and the 
correlation of the post-Laurentian series in 
the Sudbury region with the Huroniau and 
associated series in the Lalce Superior dis- 
trict. 

Conglomerates enclosed in gneissic 

terranes. 

Am. Geologist, voL 3, pp. 256-261. 1889. 

Discusses the bearing of the occurrence of 
pebbles in crystalline rocks of various ages, 
including the Laurentian, on the clastic origin 
of some of the Laurentian members. 



DABTOir.] 



RECORD OF GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



169 



WINCHELL, Alexander— Continued. 

Ou the Arcbeau. See FRAZEH, 

Report on Archean. 

WINCHELL, H. V. Partial report of 
observations made by. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Sarvej, 
Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 403-419. , 1887. 

On crystalline rocks of a portion of north* 
eastern Misnesota. 

Report of observations mad'e daring 

tbe snnimer of 1887. 

Minnesota, G-eol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Sixteenth Report, pp. 395-478, map. 1888. 

De8cription.of relations and characteristics 
of crystalliDe rocks along various routes in 
northwest Minnesota. References to Greta* 
ceous outliers. 

Tbe diabasic scbists containing the 

jaspilyte beds of northeastern Minne- 
sota. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 3, pp. 18-22. 1889. 

Description and discussion of relations of the 
massive and of schistose basic series and their 
siliceous and ferruginous associates. 

Report of field observations made 

during the season of 1888 in the iron 
regions of Minnesota. 

Minnesota, G-eol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Seventeenth Report, pp. 77-145. 1889. 

Notes on region east of Tower. Bisonssiun 
of the relations of the several formations, 
pages 128-135. 

[ Professor Irving and the Eeewatin 

series, and the origin and horizon of 
the iron ores of the Vermilion Lake 
series.] See WINCHELL, N. H. and 
H.V. 

I 

On a possible chemical origin of the 

iron ores of the Keewatin in Minnesota. 
See WINCHELL, N. H., and H. V. 

WINCHELL, N. H. Geological report. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Fifteenth Report, 1886, pp. 211-399. map. 
1887. 

Detailed description of Yermllion Lake iron 
region and vicinity, and discussion of the 
structural relations, stratigraphy, equiva* 
lency, age, extent, origin, etc., of the several 
formations and of the "jaspilyte rock." Gives 
list of some glacial strisB. Describes some 
features of the May hew Lake titaniferous iron- 
ore district. Accompanied by a fended, col- 
ored, geologic map. 

Notes on the classification and no- 
menclature for the American Committee 
of the International Geological Cou- 
gresS; March, 1887. 



WINCHELL, N. H.— Continued. 

American Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 693-700. 
1887. 

After stating the present>)ondition of the 
Taoonio question, discusses the history, ap- 
plication, and. equivalency of the terms *' Ta- 
conic," "Primordial, "and "Cambrian," show- 
ing that "Taconio" was prior t« "Cambrian" 
under the same conditions of application, and 
was originally applied with equal error. It 
is urged that "Taconic" should be retained 
for the first fauna and " Cambrian " for the 
second, in accordance with tbe purpose of 
their authors. Discusses the subdivisions of 
the Archean and the use of tbe term. 

-^ — The granite and quartz ite contact of 
the Aurora mine, Gogebic iron range, at 
Iron wood, Michigan. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Science, Froc, vol. 36, p. 
211, i p. 1888. 

. Discusses the nature and origin of the 
granite, and refers it to the Huronian. 

The Animikie black slates and quartz- 

iteS| and the Ogishke conglomerate of 
Minnesota, the equivalent of the ^^ orig- 
inal Huronian." 

(Am. G-eologist, vol. 1, pp. 11-14. 1888. 

Includes a review of the characteristics of 
the original Huronian, and a table suggesting 
the equivalency of the several members with 
similar rocks in Minnesota and Wisconsin. 

— Some objections to the term Taconio 
considered. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 1, pp. 162-173. 1888. 

Discussion of the status of the term and dis- 
cussion of the objections advanced against its 
adoption. 

A great primordial quartzite. 

Am. Geologist, voL 1, pp. 173-178. 1888. 

Correlation of Cambrian quartzites of the 
Taoonic region, the Potsdam sandstone of 
Xew York, the Huronian qnartzites of Min- 
nesota and Wisconsin, the "Potsdam" sand- 
stone of the Black Hills of Dakota, and the 
eastern sandstones of Michigan. 

r ] Note [on small outliers of Creta- 
ceous in Minnesota]. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, p. 334, ^ p. 188& 
Beferences to localities and characteristics. 

Report of the subcommittee on the 

lower Paleozoic. 

International Congress of Geologists, Am. 
Committee Reports, 1888, B, pp. 37. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 193-22i. 1888. 

Discussion of nomenclature, especially in 
regard to the use of the terms " Taconic " and 
**St. Croix." Includes extracts of letters 
from J. D. Dana, S. W. Ford, James Hall, C. H. 
Hitchcock, Alexander Winchell, J. S. New- 
berry, G. H. Williams, J. W. D»wson, A. R. 0. 



170 



REOOBD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



[bull. 75. 



"WINCHELL, N. H.— OoDtinued. 

Selwyn, B. K. Emerson, Joseph Le Conte, 
James Macfarlaae, S. F. Emmons, A. Hague, 
W. P. Blake, and C. E. Datton, and synopsis 
of oonclosions by C. D. Waloott on the 
*'Taoonic system of Emmons," which is also 
reviewed. 

Preface. 

Minnesota, Greology of, Final Report, toL 
2, pp. 13-24. 1888. 

Discussion of some of the stratigraphio re- 
lations and equivalency of members of the 
Cambrian in the Minnesota and Mississippi 
valleys. Reference to Cretaoeons areas and 
glacial history. 

— The geolo^ of Wabasha County. 

Minnesota, Geology of, Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 1-19, map. 1888. 

Description of Cam.brian and l?renton areas 
and the drifts and terraces. Reference to the 
probable occurrence of Cretaceons. Discos- 
sion of the history of some drainage and topo- 
graphic featores. Accompanied by a colored 
geologic map. 

The geology of Goodhue Couuty. 

Minnesota, G-eology of. Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 20-61, map. 1888. 

Description of Cambrian, Trenton, Cre- 
taceous, drifts and terraces. List of fossils. 
Discussion of relation of some drainage feat- 
ures, ancient and modem, extent of Creta- 
ceous, origin of some topographic features, 
and history of some of the dnfts. Accom- 
panied by a colored geologic map. 

The geology of Dakota County. 

Minnesota, G-eology of. Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 62-101, map. 1888. 

Description of lower Silurian and Cambrian 
areas, drifts, faults, terraces, gravel plains, re- 
mains of ancient drainage systems, Cretaceons 
outcrops, and the glacial history of the region. 
Accompanied by a colored geologic map. 

' The geology of Hennepin County. 

Minnesota, G-eology of, Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 264-344, map, pis. A^ M-z. 1888. 

Descriptions of Trenton limestone, St. 
Peter sandstone, and Cretaceous outcrops, 
and the drifts and terraces. Keoords of arte- 
sian wells. Beview of descriptions of St An< 
thony's Falls, and discussion of their history 
and rate of recession. Accompanied by a 
colored geologic map. 

The geology of Ramsey County. 

Minnesota, G-eology of, Final Report, vol. 
2, pp. 345-374, map. 1888. 

Description of Trenton and St. Peter sand- 
stone and the drifts. Discussion of origin of 
certain topographic features, the extent and 
stratigraphic relations of somo of the members 
of the rock formations, and the equivalency of 
some of the beds met with in the artesian 



WINCHELL, N. H.— Continued. 

wells. Accompanied by a colored geologic 
map. 

The geology of Washington County. 

Minnesota, Geology of. Final Report, voL 
2, pp. 875-398, map. 1888. 

Description of Trenton limestone, St. Peter 
■andstone, and lower magnesian limestone 
areas, the drifts, terraces, an anticlinal and 
faults in the Cambrian, and an nnconformity 
between the lower magnesian and the St. Peter 
sandstone. Accompanied by a colored geo- 
logic map. 

Beport [original Hnronian, iron- 
bearing rocks in Marquette and Gogebic 
region, and northeastern Minnesota]. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist Survey, 
Sixteenth Report, pp. 13-129. 1888. 

Description of various localities, and dis- 
cussion of structural relations, stratigraphy, 
genesis, and equivalency of the several pre- 
Cambrian members. List of directions of 
glacial striffi. 

Natural gas in Minnesota. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Bull. No. 5, pp. 39. St. Paul, 1889. 

Includes records of deep borings near Free- 
bom, Albert Lea, Mankato, Stillwater, Moor- 
head, and Duluth, and some comments on the 
geologic horizon and relations of the beds 
pierced. 

The crystalline rocks of Minnesota. 

General report of progress made in the 
study of their field relations. State- 
ment of problems yet to be solved. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Seventeenth Report, pp. 5-74. 1889. 

Review by J. D. Dana, Am. Jour. Sci.,3d 
series, vol. 39, pp. 67-68, g p. 1890. 

Abstract, Am. Geologist, vol. 5, pp. 59-60. 
1890. 

A general review and discussion of the 
stratigraphy, history, and relations of forma- 
tions from the Laurentian to the St. Croix 
sandstone. 

[ ] List of American publications be- 
tween 1872 and 1889 that have some 
relation to the crystalline rocks of the 

Northwest. 

Minnesota, Geol. and Nat. Hist. Survey, 
Seventeenth Report, pp. 233-265. 1889. 

Notice of the discovery of Lingula 

and Paradoxides in the red quartzite 
of Minnesota. 

Minnesota, Acad. Sci., Bull., vol.3, parti, 
pp. 103-105. 1889. 

Description of the remains, and brief refer- 
ence to the relations and age of the formation, 
and its representatives elsewhere. 



DABTOM.] 



EECOED OP GEOLOGY FOB 1887 TO 1889. 



171 



WINCHELL, N. H.— Continued. 

Some thoughts on eruptive rocks, 

with special reference to those of Min- 
nesota. 

Am. Amoo. AdT. Sci., Prpo., voL 37, pp. 212- 
221. 1880. 

Reviews classifloation and relations of emp- 
tive rocks in (general, advances hypothesis as 
to the genesis of acid and of basic eraptives, 
and gives a rdsnmd of the stratigraphic rela- 
tions and eruptive contents of the several 
crystalline rock series of the Northwest. 

Methods of stratigraphy in studying 



the Huronian. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 4, pp. 342>357. 1889. 

Reviews the Huronian system, and dis- 
cusses its taxonomy, relations to Laurentian, 
correlation outside of the type area, strati- 
graphic range and characteristics, and past 
and present methods of research in this con- 
nection. 

— On the Archean. See FRAZER. 



Report on Archean. 

and WINCHELL, H. V. [Profes- 
sor Irving and the Keewatin series, and 
the origin and horizon of the iron ores 
of the Vermilion Lake series.] 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 4, pp. 383- 386. 1869. 

Review of Irving's writings in this conneo- 
nection, including references to the distrihn- 
tiou, equivalency, and sideritic contents of 
iron-bearing series of Minnesota. 

On a possible chemical origin of 

the iron ores of the Keewatin in Minne- 
sota. 

Am. G-eologist, vol. 4, pp. 291-300. 1889. 

Point out the differences in characteristics 
and relations of the Keewatin and Huronian 
ores. Discuss the history of the Keewatin 
formation and advance a hypothesis as to the 
genesis of its siliceous and ferruginous mem- 
bers. 

WIN SLOW, Arthur. The Lehigh 
River cross-section, measured^ mapped, 
and described in detail. Edited by 
J. P. Lesley. 

Pennsylvania, Report of G-eol. Survey, 
1886, part 4, pp. 1331-1371, sheets 1-5, in atlas. 
1887. 

Detailed descriptions of stratigraphy and 
structure. Discussion of the stratigraphic 
range of some of the members of Nos. IX 
and X. Accompanied by maps and cross and 
columnar sections. 

• A preliminary report on a portion of 

the coal regions of Arkansas. 

Arkansas, G-eol. Survey, Report for 1888 
voL 3, pp. 1-92, map. 1888. 



WINSLOW, Arthur— Conlinued. 

General accounc of distribution, stratig- 
raphy, and structure. Descripiton of prom- 
inent localities. Analyses. Economic. Geo- 
logic map. 

Wisconsin, Animikie slates and quartz- 
ites, WiNCHKLL, N. H. 
Archean rocks of the Northwest, 

WiNCHELL, A. 

bowlder trains of central Wisconsin, 

Chamberlin, T. C. 
classification of Cambrian and pre- 

Cambrian, Irving. 
driftless area, Chamberlin, T. C. 

Chamberlin and Salisbury. 
granites of the Northwest, Hall, 

C.W. 
Huronian, Irving. 
Gogebic iron region, Eng. and 

Mining Jour. Irving. 
gre^t primordial quartzite, Winch- 

ELI., N. H. 
Great Lake basins of St. Lawrence, 

Drummond. 
iron ores of Penokee-Gogebic, Van 

HiSE. 

Irving and Chamberlin on Lake Su- 
perior sandstones, Am. Geologist. 

loess and clays, analyses, RiGGS. 

Penokee Gap region, Winchell, A. 

Quaternary of northwestern Wiscon- 
sin, Chamberlin. 

raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Lbverett. 

Beport — Lake Superior division, IJ. 
S. Geol. Survey, Irving. 
^ Report— Glacial division, U. S. Geol. 
Survey, Chamberlin. 

rock from Penokee iron ranges, an- 
alysis, RiGGS. 

Taconic system, Miller. 

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, 
Arts, and Letters, Transactions, vol. 
7. 
Raised beaches of Lake Michigan, 
Leverett. 

WOODWARD, Henry. On the dis- 
covery of Turrilepas in the Utica for- 
mation (Ordovician) of Ottawa, Can- 
ada. 

Geol. Magazine, decade m, vol. 6, pp. 271- 
275. 1889. 

Includes stratigraphic section of the beds 
at Bifle Range, near Ottawa, by H. H. AmL 



172 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



fBUU<.7f. 



WOODWARD, R. S. On the form and 
position of the sea level with special 
reference to its dependence on superfi- 
cial masses symetrically disposed about 
a normal of the earth's snrface. 

XT. S. Geol. Snnrej, Bull., vol. 8, pp. 87-172, 
2^0.48. 1888. 

Inoidentally considers c«rtAhi geologio 
cansea of earth-crast deformation. 

WOOLBRIDaS, C. W. The river-lake 
system of western Michigan. 

Am. G-eologlst, voL 1, pp. 143-148. 1888. 
Description of rations and disonssion of 
origin and history. 

The post-glacial geology of Ann 

Arbor, Michigan. 

Am. Geologist, vol. 2, pp. 35-39. 1888. 
Description of delta deposits and shore 
lines, and discussion of their liistory. 

WOOLMAN, Lewis. Geological result 
of the boring of an artesian. well at 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

Philadelphia, Acad. Sci., Froc., 1887, pp. 
339-342 

Description of 1,121-foot record, lists of fos- 
sils and statement in regard to horizons of the 
Tertiary beds passed through. 

[Fossiliferous Cretaceous limestone 

from near Clemen ton, New Jersey.] 

Am. Naturalist, voL 23, p. 544, 3 lines. 1889. 
Notice of occurrence and fossils. 

WOOSTER, L. C. The coal measures 
of Kansas. 

Science, vol. 12, p. 119, i col. 1888. 

Eng. and Mining Jour., voL 46, p. 240, | ool. 
4°. 1888. 

Describes 2,000-foot bore-hole entirely hi 
coal measures and discusses the conditions 
under which the coal measures were depos- 
ited. 

The limit of drift [Kansas]. 

Science, vol. 12, p. 132, |p. 1888. 

Calls attention to some glaciated bowlders 
and briefly discusses their mode of transpor- 
tation. 

"WHTG-HT, G. Frederick. Notes on the 
glaciation of the Pacific coast. 

Am. Naturalist, vol. 21, pp. 250-256. 1887. 

Describes results of glaciation along North- 
ern Pacific Bailroad west from Bismarck, in 
the region about Paget Sound, and glaciers 
and evidence of glacial action up the coast. 
Discusses the glacial history of the Puget 
Sound region. 

The Muir glacier. 

Am. Jour. Sci., 8d series, vol. 33, pp. 1-18. 
1887. 



"WRiaHT, G. Frederick— Continued. 

Sci. Am., Snpt., vol. 23, pp 9252-0254. No. 
679. 1887. 

Description of the glacier, its moraines, its 
motion, evidence of its retreat, associated 
drift and rock formations, 8tri», and burled 
forest and other glaciers in its vicini^. 

[*' The ice age in North America."] 

Am. Qeologist, voL 1, p. 68, i p. 18 J& 
Notice of lecture to Lowell Institute. Ref- 
erence to nature of evidence indicative of two 
glacial epochs. 

On the age of the Ohio gravel beds. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist^ Proc., voL S3, pp. 
427-436. 1888. 

Extract, " Preglacial man in Ohio," Ohio 
Arch, and Hist. Quart. December, 1887. 

Describes the relations of the Trenton 
gravels and of deposits of similar origin in 
the valley of the Little Miami in Ohio, and 
discusses the date of their deposition in gla- 
cial times. 

The ice age in North America, and 

its bearings upon the antiquity of man. 
640 pages, maps. New York, 1889. 

Abstract, Popular Science Monthly, vol. 
85, pp. 557-560. 1880. 

Review, W. M. Davis, Science, vol. 14, pp. 
118-119. 1889 ; Appalachia, vol. 6, pp. 72-73. 
1890. 

L What is a glacier t IL Existing glaciers 
on the Pacific coast. Ill- A month with the 
Muir glacier. lY. Glaciers of Greenland. 
Y. Glaciers in other parts of the world. VL 
Signs of glaciation. YIL Boundary of the 
glaciated area in North America. YIIL 
Depth of ice during the glacial period. IX. 
Terminal moraines. X. Glacial erosion and 
transportation. XL Drumlina. X£L Pre- 
glacial drainage. Xnn Drainage during the 
glacial period. XIY. Eames. XY. Glacisl 
dams, lakes, and waterfslls. XYI. The loess. 
XYlX. Flight of plants and animals during 
the glacial period. XYIII. Europe during 
the glacial period. XIX. The cause of the 
glacial period. XX. The date of the glaciid 
period. XXI-XXII. Man and the glacial 
period. Appendix: A. Probable causes of 
glaciation. B. Chalmers on the glaciation of 
eastern Canada. 

The age of the Philadelphia red 



gravel. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., Proc, vol. 24, pp. 
152-157. 1889. 

Discussion of the age and condition of dep- 
osition of the Columbia formation, and inoi- 
dentally considers the origin of some high- 
level Columbia gravels in the Susquehanna 
valley. 

— [Image from deep well at Nampa, 

Idaho.] 

Am. Geologist, voL 4, pp. 387-388. 1888. 



DABTON.] 



RECORD OP GEOLOGY FOR 1887 TO 1889. 



173 



"WRIGHT. G. Frederick— Continued. 
Inclades record of 320-foot well and ex- 
pression of opinions in regard to tiie age of 
the beds in which the image was found. 

The glacial bonndary in southeast- 
ern Dakota. [Abstract.] 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., Proc., yoL 37, pp. 
208-212. 1889. 

An account of the glacial deposits, moraines, 
and topographic characteristics of the region, 
and discussion of its glacial history. 

Chipped implement in the drift, 

Jackson County, Illinois. See ORES- 
SON, Hilbome T. 

W YATT, Francis. The development of 
the American chemical industry. — Salt. 

Eng. and Mining Jonr., voL i4, pp.411, i32- 
433.448-449. 1887. 

Description of salt deposits and borings in 
Michigan and New York. 

Wyoming, Brontops robust us from the 
Miocene, Mabsh. 

coal, ASHBURNER. 

Cretaceous, Ward. 
geologic history of Yellowstone Park, 
Hague. 



Wyoming — Continued . 

leuoite rook, Absaroka range, Hague. 

Laramie, White, C. A. 

lithophysiB and lamination of lavas, 
Yellowstone Park, Iddings. 

obsidian cliff, Yellowstone Park, Id- 
dings. 

oil fields, RiGGS. 

Beport of Geologist, Ricketts. 

siliceous sinters in thermal springs. 
Weed. 

skull of CeratopsidsB, Marsh. 

Tertiary, Cope. 

upper Eocene lacustrine formations, 
Scott. 

Yellowstone Park, Hague. Iddimgs. 

TOULA. 

Wyoming, Report of Texxitorial Qeol- 
ogiat for 1887, Ricketts. 

z. 

ZINCKEN, C. Der natnrgas Amerikas 
nach A. Williams, C. Zincken,C. A. Ash- 
burner, etc., ss. 13, 4^. Leipzig, 1887 f 
Not seen. 



I 



( 



iiliill 



3 tlDS OSS SSS 'fOD 



I 



fr^yo 



3^ 



Stanford University Libraries 






3 tlOS 022 S2fl 100 



^^yo3 



m 



n